Super Fun Family Friendly Days to Celebrate in November

I know I’ve said it before but Fall is rapidly becoming my favorite season. The older I get, the less I can stand the heat of the summer. Although I absolutely hate Winter, nothing about it appeals to me in any way. But, Fall is the middle ground that is just alright with me.

That being said, here is the list of November National days and I KNOW you are going to get a kick out of these days. There are some really great activities this month.

november national days

NOVEMBER NATIONAL DAYS

National Family Literacy Day is observed each year on November 1.

This day boasts special activities and events that showcase the importance of family literacy programs.

National Literacy Day kicks off National Literacy Month in November.

During the month of November, there are many events which are held at schools, libraries and other literacy organizations.

Get together with family and read a book together or try some other fun activity that involves reading together.

 

Each year on November 2 is National Broadcast Traffic Professional’s Day.

This day honors those in all radio and television traffic departments, who schedule and work very diligently with programs, announcements and much more, on our nation’s broadcast stations

The first commercial broadcast took place on KDKA radio out of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on November 2, 1920.  Also known as National Traffic Directors Day or National Traffic Professional’s Day, it honors the thousands of professionals directors in broadcast media since that day who have worked behind the scenes keeping the entertainment, talk shows, news, and commercials flowing.  Through breaking news alerts, stormy weather, budgets and differing personalities, these men and women maintain program development.

Thank a traffic director today.

National Sandwich Day is observed every year on November 3. The sandwich is believed to be the namesake of John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich, following the claim that he was the inventor of the sandwich.  This day honors one of America’s most popular lunch items.

While the modern sandwich is believed to be named after John Montagu, the exact circumstances of its invention and original use are the subjects of debate.  There is a rumor in a contemporary travel book titled Tour to London, by Pierre Jean Grosley, that formed the popular myth that bread and meat sustained Lord Sandwich at the gambling table.

It is said that Lord Sandwich was a very conversant gambler and did not take the time to have a meal during his long hours playing at the card table.  When hungry, he would ask his servants to bring him slices of meat between two slices of bread.  This practice was a habit which was well known to his gambling friends who soon began to order “the same as Sandwich,” and from this, the sandwich was born.

N.A.M. Rodger, who wrote Sandwich’s biography, suggests that because of Sandwich’s commitment to the navy, politics and the arts the first sandwich was more likely to have been consumed at his work desk.

Before being known as sandwiches, the food seems just to have been known as bread and meat or bread and cheese.

Some of the most common sandwiches include BLT – Cheese Sandwich – Philadelphia Cheesesteak – Club Sandwich – Dagwood – French Dip – Hamburger – Monte Cristo – Muffuletta – Peanut Butter & Jelly Sandwich – Pilgrim – Po’boy – Reuben – Sloppy Joe – Submarine – Tuna Fish Sandwich – Veggie Sandwich – Deli Sandwich

Go out for a sandwich with the kids or enjoy one of the following sandwich recipes together:

California Grilled Veggie Sandwich
BBQ Pork for Sandwiches
Real N’awlins Muffuletta
Shrimp Po’ Boys

 

National Candy Day is observed on November 4th.

Candies come in numerous colors, shapes, sizes, and varieties and have a long history in popular culture.

People use the term candy as a broad category that includes candy bars, chocolates, licorice, sour candies, salty candies, tart candies, hard candies, taffies, gumdrops, marshmallows and much more.

Way back in time, before sugar was readily available, candy was made from honey.  The honey was used to coat fruits and flowers to preserve them or to create forms of candy.

There is still candy that is served in this way today, but it is typically seen as a garnish.

Originally a form of medicine, candy calmed the digestive system or cooled a sore throat.  At this time, combined with spices and sugar, candy only appeared in the purses and the dishes of the wealthy.

It was in the 18th century that the first candy is believed to have come to America from Britain and France.

At this time, the simplest form of candy was Rock Candy made from crystallized sugar. However, even the basic form of sugar was considered a luxury and was only attainable by the wealthy.

Since 1979, the world has produced more sugar than can be sold, making it very attainable and cheap.

When the technological advances and the availability of sugar opened up the market in the 1830s, the candy business underwent a drastic change.

Candy was not only for the enjoyment of the well to do but the pleasure of everyone.  Penny candies became popular, targeting children.

  • 1847 – Invention of the candy press making it possible to produce multiple shapes and sizes of candy at one time.
  • 1851 – Confectioners began using a revolving steam pan to assist in boiling sugar.

The two top-selling candies in America have been:

  • M & M’S — M&M’s are milk chocolate drops with a colorful candy coating on the outside. The candies were first manufactured in 1941 and were given to American soldiers serving in the Second World War. M&M’s are produced by Mars Inc.
  • Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups — Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups are round chocolate disks that are filled with a sweet, creamy peanut butter filling. The cups were first manufactured in 1928 by the Hershey’s company.

Grab a pack of your kids favorite candy and enjoy as a family.

 

November 5 is one of two National Doughnut Days observed by doughnut lovers across the nation. The first Friday in June is the other day doughnuts steal the bakery case spotlight ready to tease their way into white bakery box home!

The history of the doughnut is disputed:

  • One theory suggests Dutch settlers brought doughnuts to North America much like they brought other traditional American desserts including cookies, apple pie, cream pie, and cobbler.
  • An American, Hanson Gregory, claimed to have invented the ring-shaped doughnut in 1847 while on board a lime-trading ship at the age of 16.  According to Gregory, he punched a hole in the center of dough with the ship’s tin pepper box and later taught the technique to his mother.
  • Anthropologist Paul R Mullins states the first cookbook mentioning doughnuts was an 1803 English volume which included doughnuts in an appendix of American recipes.
  • An 1808 short story describing a spread of “fire-cakes and dough-nuts” is the earliest known recorded usage of the term doughnut.
  • A more commonly cited first written recording of the word is Washington Irving’s reference to doughnuts in 1809 in his History of New York.  He described balls of sweetened dough, fried in hog’s fat and called doughnuts.  Today, these nuts of fried dough are called doughnut holes.

Donut versus Doughnut

  • Print ads for cake and glazed donuts and doughnuts existed from at least 1896 in the United States.
  • Peck’s Bad Boy and his Pa, written by George W. Peck and published in 1900, contained the first known printed use of donut. In it, a character is quoted as saying, “Pa said he guessed he hadn’t got much appetite and he would just drink a cup of coffee and eat a donut.”
  • In 1919, the Square Donut Company of America was founded, offering an easier to package product.

The more traditional spelling is doughnut. However, both doughnut and donut are pervasive in American English.

While doughnuts come in a large variety of recipes, flavors, and toppings, just like many pastries, we are only limited by imagination and ingredients at hand.  From syrups and jellies to sprinkles and custards, top them, fill them, bake them or fry them, doughnuts have a mouth-watering way of glazing and dusting their way into our shopping carts and finding their way to the break room at work to share.

Use this…

and try making your own, or use one of the following recipes:

Best Baked Doughnuts Ever
Easy Drop Doughnuts
Easy Doughnuts
Chocolate Doughnuts

 

National Nachos Day is observed annually on November 6. In their simplest form, nachos are tortilla chips covered in nacho cheese or other melted cheese and served with salsa.

First created sometime around 1943, the popular and loved nachos are of Mexican origin.  Nachos can be made quickly and served as a snack, an appetizer or prepared with extra ingredients as a full meal.

It is believed that Ignaci “Nacho” Anaya created the original nachos in the city of Piedras Negras, Coahuila, Mexico, just across the border from Eagle Pass, Texas.  The story talks of a group of United States military wives stationed at Fort Duncan in Eagle Pass who traveled to Piedras Negras on a shopping trip.  Following shopping, they arrived late to a restaurant after it had closed for the day.  Maître d, Ignacio “Nacho” Anaya served them a snack which he invented from what little was available in the kitchen: tortillas and cheese.  Anaya cut the tortillas into triangles, topped them with shredded cheddar cheese and quickly heated them.  He then added sliced jalapeno peppers and served them to the ladies. When Anaya was asked what the dish was called, he replied, “Nacho’s especiales”.  As the word of this new creation traveled, people tried them, loved them and over time, the name changed and Nacho’s “specials” became “special nachos”.

The original recipe is printed in the 1954 St. Anne’s Cookbook.

The popularity of the new dish spread swiftly throughout Texas and the Southwest and has since gained millions of fans across America.

Some favorite nachos toppings are refried beans, ground beef, shredded beef, chicken, seafood, shredded cheese, jalapeno peppers, green pepper,  lettuce, tomatoes, black olives, onion, sour cream, and guacamole.

Check out this cookbook dedicated to nachos…

 

National Bittersweet Chocolate with Almonds Day is observed each year on November 7th.

Bittersweet chocolate is chocolate liquor to which sugar, cocoa butter, and vanilla have been added.  It has less sugar and more liquor than semisweet chocolate. However, the two of them may be interchangeable when baking.

Recent studies have revealed health benefits from eating small quantities of bittersweet chocolate. Almonds have health benefits as well. Pairing the two of them together gives us a delicious and healthful snack to be enjoyed on this fall day.

In 1742, Eliza Smith included the only chocolate recipe in her cookbook The Compleat Housewife printed by William Parks. The simple recipe combined grated chocolate, orange flower water, and sugar.

If that doesn’t peak your interest then check out a few of these recipes:

Bittersweet Chocolate Bark with Marcona Almonds
Bittersweet Chocolate and Almond Cake
Chocolate Dipped Almond Anise Biscotti
The Perfect Chocolate Chip Cookies (Whole Wheat)

 

November 8 is a day meant to inspire kids to explore and pursue their interests in Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math.

Why is S.T.E.M./S.T.E.A.M. so important, now more than ever before?

·         S.T.E.M./S.T.E.A.M. is all around us and shapes our everyday experiences

·         Of the U.S. Labor Department‘s predicted 10 fastest growing occupations, nearly all of them are S.T.E.M./S.T.E.A.M. careers; therefore an interest in S.T.E.M./S.T.E.A.M. early on can lead to success later on in life

·         The U.S. has fallen behind other nations in science and math education; we need to motivate young kids to pursue these subjects to keep up with the rest of the world

·         We must close the gender gap that exists in S.T.E.M./S.T.E.A.M. related-careers. Building interest in girls is critical to their future earning potential.

Get your girls and boys involved with learning Math and Science today, no matter how young they are, it is never too early to learn.

 

National Scrapple Day is observed annually on November 9th. Scrapple is arguably the first pork food invented in America.

For those who are not familiar with scrapple, it is traditionally a mush of pork scraps and trimmings combined with cornmeal, wheat flour, and spices.  (The spices may include but are not limited to sage, thyme, savory and black pepper.)  The mush is then formed into a semi-solid loaf, sliced and pan-fried.

I know it doesn’t sound very appetizing for those who don’t know what it is, but I assure you it tastes fantastic!

It was in the 17th and 18th centuries that the first recipes for scrapple were created by Dutch colonists who settled near Philadelphia and Chester County, Pennsylvania.   Hence the origin of its discovery, it is strongly associated with rural areas surrounding Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington D.C., eastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware, eastern Virginia and the Delmarva Peninsula.

  • Scrapple can be found in supermarkets throughout the area in both refrigerated and frozen cases.
  • Home recipes for beef, chicken and turkey scrapple are available.
  • Scrapple is sometimes deep-fried or broiled instead of pan frying.
  • Scrapple is typically eaten as a breakfast side dish.
  • Condiments are sometimes served with scrapple, some of which include apple butter, ketchup, jelly, maple syrup, honey, horseradish or mustard.

Have some scrapple. Following are a few scrapple recipes for you to try:

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/scrapple/
http://www.cooks.com/recipe/pt6o151m/scrapple.html
http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/359/ChickenScrapple61687.shtml

 

National Vanilla Cupcake Day is observed annually on November 10. This is a day for dessert lovers across the country to celebrate and indulge.

Cupcakes have also been known to be called:

  • Fairy Cakes
  • Patty Cakes
  • Cup Cakes (different from Cupcakes (one-word)

Cupcakes can be traced back to 1796 when a recipe notation of a cake to be baked in small cups was written in American Cookery (by Amelia Simmons).  The earliest known documentation of the term cupcake was in 1828 in Seventy-five Receipts for Pastry, Cakes, and Sweetmeats in Eliza Leslie’s Receipts cookbook.

Cupcakes were originally baked in heavy pottery cups.  Today, some bakers still use individual ramekins, small coffee mugs, larger teacups, or other small ovenproof pottery-type dishes for baking their cupcakes.

To celebrate National Vanilla Cupcake Day, share some cupcakes with your friends and family. Make one or all of the following vanilla cupcake recipes.

Classic Vanilla Cupcakes
Raspberry Filled Vanilla Cupcakes
Sour Cream Cupcakes

 

National Sundae Day is observed each year on November 11.  Ice cream lovers across the country will celebrate all day, enjoying one (or more) of the most famous ice cream dessert, the ice cream sundae.

An ice cream sundae typically consists of one or two scoops of ice cream topped with syrup or sauce.  The sundae is often topped with whipped cream, maraschino cherry, sprinkles, pineapple or a variety of other toppings.

The oldest known record of an ice cream sundae is an advertisement in the Ithica Daily Journal dated October 5, 1892, with the conventional day of the week spelling – Sunday.

It has been hotly debated where the sundae originated.  There has been a friendly rivalry between Ithica, New York, and Two Rivers, Wisconsin over which city is the true birthplace of the sundae.

The Two Rivers’ claim is that in 1881, Druggist Edward Berners served the sweet concoction when customer George Hallauer ordered an ice cream soda.  Because it was the Sabbath, ice cream sodas were prohibited at that time.  As a compromise, Berners served the ice cream in a dish without soda and topped it with chocolate syrup.  This story is disputed by some because Berners would have only been 18 at the time the story takes place.

 

National Chicken Soup for the Soul Day is observed each year on November 12.  According to our research, this day was created to celebrate who you are, where you have been, where you are going and who you will be thankful to when you get there.   

Chicken Soup for the Soul is a publisher and consumer goods company founded in 1993 with its headquarters in Cos Cob, Connecticut. The first book, as most subsequent titles in the series, was of true stories written by ordinary people about their own lives and soon became a best-seller.

National  Chicken Soup for the Soul Day is a celebration about you!

                  

 

On November 13 as part of World Kindness Day, we are encouraged to spread kindness like an infectious cold. We want to share it more than usual because studies show when others observe kindness in action they are more likely to carry out an act of kindness, too.

So, imagine if you head out for the day and your neighbor’s garbage can has tipped over. Instead of ignoring it and letting the wind make a mess, you pick it up and return it to the corner. Three other neighbors notice and give you a smile and a nod on their way to work.

One of those neighbors notices a stranded driver on the side of the road on his commute to work. He remembers your thoughtfulness and offers assistance to the stranded driver. Several passersby take notice.

At a business office, a woman struggles with a paper jam. She’s had a horrible day. The customer has been waiting, but she remembers the stranded driver she passed earlier in the day. The customer lets the office worker know to take her time. Everyone has a bad day.

We each have the potential to improve each others lives through understanding and kindness. Whether it’s a friend, family member, coworker or stranger, our ability to show our humanity should have no limit.

On World Kindness Day, let your compassion shine brightly.  Get caught showing as much kindness as possible.

For inspiration on leading a life of kindness, Orly Wahba has written a book and her organization Life Vest Inside produced a short film called Kindness Boomerang.

 

The World Kindness Movement started World Kindness Day in 1998 and has spread to 28 countries.

 

National Pickle Day is observed annually on November 14. It may be a Dill, Gherkin, Cornichon, Brined, Kosher Dill, Polish, Hungarian, Lime, Bread and Butter, Swedish and Danish, or Kool-Aid Pickle. Whichever is your choice, eat them all day long.

The term pickle comes from the Dutch word pekel, meaning brine.  In the United States, the word pickle typically refers to a pickled cucumber.

– Each year in the United States, 5,200,000 pounds of pickles are consumed.

– Pickles are a great snack, low in calories and a good source of vitamin K, though they can be high in sodium.

– When served on a stick at festivals, fairs or carnivals, pickles are sometimes known as “stick pickles”.

– A rising trend in the United States is deep-fried pickles which have a breading or batter surrounding the pickle spear or slice.

– For thousands of years, pickles have been a popular food dating back to 2030 B.C.  At that time, cucumbers were imported from India to the Tigris Valley where they were first preserved and eaten as pickles.

– Cleopatra attributed her good looks to her diet of pickles.

– Julius Caesar fed pickles to his troops believing that they lent physical and spiritual strength.

 

Each year on November 15, millions of people across the United States take part in America Recycles Day, a day which was created to raise awareness about recycling and the purchasing of recycled products.

Recycle, buy recycled goods and help teach others the benefits of recycling and continue to do so each day!

America Recycles Day was started in 1997 by the National Recycling Coalition and is declared each year by Presidential Proclamation, encouraging Americans to commit to recycling.  Since 2009, this day has been a program of Keep America Beautiful.  There are thousands of events that are held across the United States to raise awareness about the importance of recycling and offering personal pledges that can be signed, committing to recycling and buying products made from recycled materials.

 

National Button Day is observed annually on November 16. Founded in 1938, the National Button Society recognized button collecting as an organized hobby. Both novice and advanced button collectors celebrate the enjoyment collecting on this day.

Do you remember your grandmother or your mother snipping the buttons off shirts that were headed for the rag basket and then collecting them in jars? Maybe you even played games or strung them for ornaments and crafts.  The buttons were fun to stack into piles, sort by color or size, or scatter/slide across the floor or table making up different games each time.

Crafters across the country utilize buttons in creative ways and are some of the best at finding new uses for old items. There are thousands of button collectors in the United States.

 

National Take a Hike Day is observed annually on November 17.  With over 60,000 miles of trails in the National Trail System across the 50 states, there is no lack of opportunity to take a hike.

Events around the country are scheduled today to celebrate Take a Hike Day.  Hiking can burn between 400-550 calories per hour. What better way to get a head start on all those ‘other’ holiday temptations and observe Take a Hike Day?  Be sure to wear good shoes, take a snack and bring a buddy, but get out there and enjoy the fresh air, scenery and get a little exercise to boot!

This is such a beautiful time of year to go out in the crisp air and walk among nature. Get the family up and out to get their blood flowing and hike around some trails.

 

Making his debut on November 18, 1928, we commemorate the birth of that ever lovable mouse that was once a rabbit called Oswald. To get to the beginning of the story, we have to go back to 1927 when Walt Disney first sketched a floppy eared bunny while under contract to Universal Studios. The events that unraveled brought us Mickey Mouse.

Wish Mickey Mouse a Happy Birthday and celebrate a little with your Mickey loving little ones.

Mickey Mouse came to be under the roller coaster events of Oswald’s success and Universal’s disappointing contract negotiations. Disney Bros. Studio took their leave of both the studio and Oswald and set to work creating a character who would go on to lead the company into the future.

From a rabbit named Oswald to a mouse named Mortimer, eventually, the little squeaky-voiced guy was dubbed Mickey. He flopped in two animated short films without any success.

Then on November 18, 1928, Mickey’s star was born. The first animation synchronized to music and sound effects, Steamboat Willie premiered in New York.

Within a year, a Mickey Mouse Club popped up in Salem, Oregon. This particular club offered admission as a fundraiser for the Salvation Army with a donation of either a potato or a small toy and a penny. According to December 22, 1929, Statesman Journal (Salem, Oregon) article, $12 and three truckloads of potatoes and toys collected by eager new members.

Remember, the stock market crashed just 20 days before Mickey Mouse was born. That a cute little mouse could bring smiles to the faces of children at an uncertain time really isn’t such a surprise.

Generally, new members joined the club by completing an admission form obtained from a local merchant and attending meetings held during matinees at local movie houses. The price of admission often was reduced for good deeds and report cards. By the end of 1930, the Mickey Mouse Clubs had spread across the country.

Now, there is a new “Club Mickey Mouse” but, instead of a show on television, they make posts on Facebook and Instagram.

Club Mickey Mouse FB Page

Club Mickey Mouse Instagram

In 1935, animator Fred Moore gave Mickey a new look that enabled a more fluid movement to the animation.

A makeover in 1935 by animator Fred Moore gave Mickey the look we are familiar with today. The big eyes, white gloves, and the pert little nose. More lovable than ever before, he propelled himself even further into the hearts of children everywhere.

His companions Minnie, Donald, Goofy, and Pluto joined him along the way, bringing vaudevillian comedy with them.

 

National Play Monopoly Day is observed every year on November 19.

Known as one of the most popular board games in the world, the game that was originally based on a board game designed by Elizabeth Magie in 1902, Monopoly has been played by an estimated more than 5 million people since 1935.

Gather your family and friends together and play Monopoly.

 

National Absurdity Day is observed annually on November 20.

This day was created as a day to recall and note some of the entirely off the wall and ridiculous things in history, in our country and our lives.

National Absurdity Day is also a day to have fun and do crazy, zany and absurd things. Everyone has an excuse today to let out the silly antics are hidden inside them. You can do things that you have wanted to do that make absolutely no sense at all, and it will be okay because you will be celebrating National Absurdity Day.

Do whatever absurd things that pop into your mind. (Please keep safety in mind).

 

November 21 is the ideal day to join in National Stuffing Day as Thanksgiving day is right around the corner, and we are already thinking about the delicious turkey stuffing that is a traditional part of Thanksgiving dinner.

Whether the cook chooses to stuff the bird with crusts of bread, onions, celery, herbs and spices or prefers to prepare a similar dish along side the turkey using the drippings to moisten the dish is personal preference.  The difference is the first is called a stuffing, but the latter is referred to as a dressing.

The usual turkey stuffing consists of bread cubes or crumbs combined with onions, celery, salt, and pepper along with spices and herbs such as summer savory, sage or poultry seasoning.  Other varieties include adding sausage, hamburger, tofu, oysters, egg, rice, apple, raisins or other dried fruits.

The first known documented stuffing recipes appeared in the Roman cookbook, Apicius “De Re Coquinaria”.  Most of the stuffing recipes in this cookbook included vegetables, herbs and spices, nuts and spelt (an old cereal) with some of them also including chopped liver and other organ meat.

In addition to stuffing the body cavity of poultry and fish, various cuts of meat are often stuffed once deboned and having a pouch or slit cut in them.  A few examples of other meats that are frequently stuffed include pork chops, meatloaf, meatballs, chicken breast, lamb chops and beef tenderloin.

Stuffing isn’t limited to the butcher block.  Vegetables are excellent containers for stuffing.  Peppers, tomatoes zucchini and cabbage are just a few of the shapely veggies that make stuffing a fabulous part of your meal.

Give your stuffing some holiday flair with Everything Kitchen’s Sausage, Apple, Cranberry Stuffing

 

November 22

National Tie One on Day might confuse people with its name. However, it is not at all about going out, getting crazy and drinking too much while others are at home, working hard preparing for tomorrow’s big Thanksgiving Day meal.

National Tie One on Day celebrates the apron as well as the past generations of women who wore them and it was also created as a day to bring joy to the life of someone in need and celebrate the spirit of giving.

“Women clad in aprons have traditionally prepared the Thanksgiving meal, and it is within our historical linkage to share our bounty.” EllynAnne Geisel

As part of National Tie One on Day, buy an apron, bake something, tuck a note of encouragement in the pocket of the apron (or pin it on it), wrap the baked good in the apron and give it to someone in need on Thanksgiving Eve.

 

Other than Thanksgiving, November 23 is also National Eat a Cranberry Day.

Found in acidic bogs throughout the cooler regions of the northern hemisphere, cranberries are a group of evergreen dwarf shrubs, or trailing vines, that grow up to 7 feet long and 8 inches high.  Their stems are slender and wiry, and they have small evergreen leaves.

The cranberry flowers are dark pink with very distinct reflexed petals, leaving the style and stamens fully exposed and pointing forward. The fruit of the cranberry plant is a berry that is larger than the leaves and is initially white but when ripe, turns a deep red.

CRANBERRIES:

  • Have an acidic taste that can overwhelm their sweetness.
  • Are a major commercial crop in certain American states;  Massachusetts, New Jersey, Oregon, Washington, and Wisconsin. 
  • Wisconsin is the leading producer of cranberries, with over half of U.S. production.
  • Are mostly processed into products such as juice, sauce, jam or sweetened dried cranberries.
  • Cranberry sauce is considered an indispensable part of a traditional American Thanksgiving meal.
  • Raw cranberries have been marketed as a “superfruit” due to their nutrient content and antioxidant qualities.
  • There are three to four species of cranberry, classified into two sections.
  • White cranberry juice is made from regular cranberries that have been harvested after the fruits are mature, but before they have attained their characteristic dark red color.
  • Cranberry wine is made in some of the cranberry-growing regions of the United States.
  • Laboratory studies indicate that extracts containing cranberry may have anti-aging effects.

The word cranberry comes from “craneberry”;  first named by the early European settlers in America who felt the expanding flower, stem, calyx and petals resembled the neck, head and bill of a crane.

I will be celebrating this day by partaking in way to much cranberry relish and/or sauce.

 

This is such a great day to follow Thanksgiving, especially for children 🙂

Welcomegiving Day is observed annually on the day after Thanksgiving. Conventionally when someone thanks us for a kindness or service, we respond by saying, “You’re Welcome.”  So, it was inevitable that someone would suggest the day after Thanksgiving we should begin to celebrate You’re Welomegiving Day.

Make sure to say You’re Welcome.

Richard Ankli of Ann Arbor, Michigan, creator of the unreasonable holiday Sourest Day and the rhyming May Ray Day, designated You’re Welcomegiving Day in 1977 as a way to create a four-day weekend.

 

Usually served in a specially styled glass, layers of fruit, yogurt or ice cream, and nuts, chocolate or even whipped cream are the ingredients on National Parfait Day on November 25.

A French word that literally means perfect was originally used to describe a kind of frozen dessert beginning in 1894.

In the United States, parfaits are served in the traditional French style by layering parfait cream, ice cream, gelato or pudding in a clear, tall glass topped with whipped cream, fruit or liqueurs. 

The Northern United States expanded on the parfait and began to use yogurt layered with nuts or granola or fresh fruits which may be, but are not limited to, strawberries, blueberries, bananas or peaches. This idea spread quickly across all parts of the country, and the yogurt parfait gained popularity as a breakfast item.

Times have changed over the years, and now parfaits are made up of almost any dessert combination that works well put into layers in a tall, clear glass, ranging from crushed Oreo cookies and cheesecake with whipped cream to angel food cake pieces and lemon cream filling with whipped cream.

Try one of the following parfait recipes:

Chocolate Peanut Butter Parfaits
Fresh Orange Cream Parfaits
Tropical Tapioca Parfaits

 

National Cookie Day is observed annually on November 26.
We can thank the Dutch for more than windmills and tulips.  The English word “cookie” is derived from the Dutch word “koekie” meaning little cake.
There have been cookie-like hard wafers in existence for as long as baking has been documented.  This is because they traveled well however, they were usually not sweet enough to be considered cookies by modern day standards.

The origin of the cookie appears to begin in Persia in the 7th century, soon after the use of sugar became common in the region.  They were then spread to Europe through the Muslim conquest of Spain.  Cookies were common in all levels of society throughout Europe by the 14th century, from the royal cuisine to the street vendors.

Cookies arrived in America in the 17th century.  Macaroons and gingerbread cookies were among the popular early American cookies.

In most English-speaking countries outside of North America, the most common word for cookie is biscuit.  In some regions, both terms, cookies and biscuits are used.

Cookies are classified into different categories, with the most common ones being:

Bar cookies – Drop cookies – Filled cookies
Molded cookies – No bake cookies
Pressed cookies – Refrigerator cookies
Rolled cookies – Sandwich cookies

Pick up some cookies at your local bakery.  Remember to share some of your cookies with your family and friends! Try one of the following cookie recipes:

First Place Coconut Macaroons
Gingerbread Cookies

 

Each year on November 27, people across the country observe National Bavarian Cream Pie Day.

To make a Bavarian Cream Pie, Bavarian cream, also called crème bavaroise, is poured into a baked pie crust and refrigerated.

French chef, Marie Antione Careme is given credit for the invention of Bavarian cream, which is a gelatin-based pastry cream originally served in gourmet restaurants and luxury hotels in France in the early 19th century.

Enjoy this Vanilla Bavarian Cream Pie recipe.

 

We have a day for giving thanks. We have two for getting deals. Now, we have #GivingTuesday, a global day dedicated to giving back. On the Tuesday after Thanksgiving charities, families, businesses, community centers, and students around the world will come together for one common purpose: to celebrate generosity and to give.

Quite simply, take advantage of all the holiday deals to add to your charitable giving. Combined with your family, friends, local and national organizations and through the power of social media, National Day of Giving can become a tradition worth passing on.

In 2012, 92nd Street Y in New York City created National Day of Giving to bring focus to the charitable season in the wake of the commercialized Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

 

Observed annually on November 29th, Electronic Greetings Day reminds us of how things have changed.  The convenience and speed of sending an electronic greeting allows more people than ever to participate in this thoughtful process.  We all enjoy it when someone remembers our birthdays, anniversaries and other important life events. While greeting cards continue to be used, electronic greetings are far more cost-effective and mean equally as much.

Send an electronic Greeting.

Not long after the advent of electronic mail (e-mail) in 1993, the electronic greeting came along.  The first electronic greeting card site was The Electric Postcard and was created by Judith Donath in 1994 at the MIT Media Lab.  Within our research, we were unable to find the creator of Electronic Greetings Day.

 

Did you wake well rested, feeling vigorous and ready for the day? Then you are ready to celebrate Stay Home Because You’re Well Day. This day is celebrated on November 30.

This holiday has no agenda other than to spend a healthful day at home. What you do with it is up to you.

Here are some suggestions if you are having trouble deciding what to do.

  • Catch up on some reading.
  • Take a walk.
  • Get started on your Christmas cards.
  • Follow a toddler around all day.  You do feel well, remember?
  • Take a friend to lunch.
  • Get your 2017 calendar up to date.
  • Try a new recipe and make extra to share with someone who wasn’t feeling well today.
  • Take a nap
  • Plan your next vacation.
  • Make a list of all your single friends and match them up as potential mates.
  • Organize all those photos on your phone.
  • Work on an art project.
  • Clean out your closet and make a donation.

 

This month has been quite fun to go through and find all the great National days to celebrate with your family and friends.

Let me know which one or few are your favorites from this list or which silly celebrations your family participates in every year.

I hope you have a wonderful week and a great Halloween.

Don’t eat to much candy 🙂

 

november national days

Hello, my name is Kristen Osborne I am a happy mother of one beautiful little girl. Very into the internet and trying out new things.

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