Super Fun Days in October to Celebrate with the Family

My favorite season, in general, is summer. But, I do find the month of October to be beautiful and full of wonder.

I love all the Fall decorations and it seems that you can use most of the Autumn crops in your decor at home. In my opinion, no other season is quite like the Fall.

Although, there is something I do not like about this time of year…… PUMPKIN SPICE EVERYTHING! Please, just stop.

Obviously, Pumpkin Spice and I are not friends but I do appreciate a nice slice of pumpkin pie or 1, 2 or 3 apple cider donuts with my French Vanilla Coffee.

I especially like the Fall Festivals and activities that seem to happen in October.

And that leads us to this months edition of NATIONAL DAYS…

October

National Fire Pup Day on October 1 recognizes the canine firefighters that have long been members of fire departments across the country.

While the Dalmation’s origin is unknown, their use in firehouses began during the 1700s. Trained as a carriage dog, the Dalmatian’s agility transferred quickly to horse-drawn fire engines.  In the days of the horse-drawn fire carts, they provided a valuable service, having a natural affinity to horses.  The Dalmatians would run alongside the horses, in front of or beneath the wagon axles and clear the way for safety.
Long after the red engines replaced horse-drawn wagons, the Dalmatian remains a recognizable tradition in fire stations across the country.  They serve as firehouse mascots, educate the public about fire safety and represent past fire pups in honor of their heroism.

Child Health Day is a United States Federal Observance Day held each year on the first Monday in October.

 

 

 

Each child deserves to be the healthiest he or she can be.  On National Child Health Day, we are reminded of all the ways children grow healthy and strong.  From the food they eat to the words they hear, children require support and opportunities to grow.

Each year since 1928, under a Joint Resolution of Congress, the President of the United States has proclaimed Child Health Day.  This day was originally observed on each May 1 until 1960 when the date was changed to the first Monday in October of each calendar year.

In a response to a plea from both the American Federation of Labor and the General Federation of Women’s Clubs to proclaim the day, United States President Calvin Coolidge was the first president to issue a Child Health Day Proclamation while the resolution was still pending in Congress.

To celebrate Child Health day, go for a walk, play in a park, do some yard work or participate in activities to promote child health.

 

October 3 is National Look at the Leaves Day.

In early October, the leaves really start to change and fall from the trees making beautiful scenes all over the ground.

When it starts to get cooler outside and the sun does not shine for as long each day, trees know it is time to start storing up food for winter. To do that, the chlorophyll in the leaves starts to break down and the food that the leaves have been making is stored inside the tree instead of in the leaves.

Now that the chlorophyll is gone, instead of being green, the leaves become all the pretty colors of fall, like orange, yellow, red, or even purple! These colors have actually been in the leaves all summer long, we just couldn’t see them because the green from the chlorophyll was blocking them.

Take the kids outside and rake up the leaves if only to jump in and spread them all around again.

 

National Taco Day is observed annually on October 4.  Tacos are loved and eaten by millions each day in either hard or soft shell with a variety of fillings.

The history of tacos predates the arrival of Europeans in Mexico. Anthropological evidence shows the native people living in the lake region of the Valley of Mexico traditionally ate tacos filled with small fish.  At the time of the Spanish conquistadors, Bernal Diaz del Castillo documented the first taco feast enjoyed by Europeans.  This meal was arranged by Hernan Cortes for his captains in Coyoacan. It is unclear why the Spanish used the word taco to describe this native food.  One suggested origin is the word ataco, meaning stuff or to stuff.

Many restaurants offer specials for National Taco Day. Go out for tacos or make them at home. There are many traditional varieties of tacos.

 

Each year on October 5, people across the nation observe National Do Something Nice Day.

National Do Something Nice Day is very similar to National Random Acts of Kindness Day, which is celebrated on February 17. (Celebrate February)

It would be ideal if everyone lived their lives doing kind things on a daily basis and without thinking about it. Today serves as a reminder to us all, as it is easy to get caught up with hectic schedules and fast-paced lifestyles, to stop for a moment and do something nice.

“Real generosity is doing something nice for someone who will never find out.” ~Frank A. Clark

Do something nice. Get the kids involved.  The something can be anything from buying a cup of coffee for someone in line at the coffee shop to giving a compliment to the tired clerk.

Maybe the day calls for sending flowers with a card that says “just because,” or asking the neighbors over for a barbecue in the backyard or mowing the lawn for someone.

 

Noodles come in many varieties, and National Noodle Day, which is observed each year on October 6, recognizes them all.

The word noodle derives from the German word nudel.

Noodles are made by rolling unleavened dough out and cutting into a variety of shapes.  While long, flat noodles may seem to be the most common, they come in a variety of forms, names, and textures.  Each kind of noodle will pair differently with different kinds of sauces and meals.

Found in regions all over the world, noodles are made from a variety of flours.  In Asian cuisine, root vegetables, such as yams and potatoes, beans, rice, wheat, and buckwheat are all found in a wide assortment of noodles. Europeans make most of their pasta from durum or semolina flour, though potato noodles are enjoyed as well.

In 2002, archaeologists along the Yellow River in China found an earthenware bowl containing some 4000-year-old noodles which had been well preserved. That’s impressive!

Let the kids choose which type of noodles they would like to eat.

Have different types of toppings like:

  • shredded cheese
  • beans
  • croutons or goldfish
  • crackers
  • sauces
  • chili
  • etc

 

National Inner Beauty Day is observed annually on October 7.  Everyone has a story, a passion that expresses who we are as individuals.  Our strength lies in embracing that story without filtering it through someone else’s definition of beauty.  When our core values are reflected on the outside we have truly given the world the gift we were born to give.

 

This day was created by Roma Newton, owner of 6Degrees Management in partnership with National Day Calendar to celebrate the beauty we all have, beginning with what is on the inside. In partnership with Saving Innocence, an organization that helps victims of human trafficking aspires to bring beauty and wholeness to a world that may not yet understand its own self-worth.

 

National Pierogi Day is observed annually on October 8. This is a day to enjoy this delicious dish.

Pierogi is the plural form of the rarely used Polish word pierog. The word Pierogi can be found spelled several ways including perogi and pierogy. However you choose to spell it, pierogi are dumplings made up of unleavened dough that is first boiled then sometimes baked or fried in butter.Usually semicircular in shape, they are traditionally stuffed with a mashed potato filling,

Usually semicircular in shape, they are traditionally stuffed with a mashed potato filling, potato and cheese, (which is my personal favorite)  potato and onion, cheese, cabbage, sauerkraut, ground meat, mushroom, spinach or fruit.

Pierogi are often served with melted butter, sour cream, fried bacon crumbles, sauteed mushrooms, and onions and/or green onion (this is the way I make the majority of my pierogi). The dessert variety, those filled with a fruit filling, can be enjoyed topped with applesauce, maple syrup, chocolate sauce and/or whipped cream.

The dessert variety, those filled with a fruit filling, can be enjoyed topped with applesauce, maple syrup, chocolate sauce and/or whipped cream.

It was the Eastern European immigrants that popularized pierogi in the United States.  At first, pierogi were a family food among the immigrants and were also found in ethnic restaurants; Freshly cooked pierogi became a staple fundraiser for ethnic churches in the post-World War II era.  By the 1960s, pierogi were being marketed for the frozen food aisles of grocery stores in many parts of the United States.

At first, pierogi were a family food among the immigrants and were also found in ethnic restaurants; Freshly cooked pierogi became a staple fundraiser for ethnic churches in the post-World War II era.  By the 1960s, pierogi were being marketed for the frozen food aisles of grocery stores in many parts of the United States.

By the 1960s, pierogi were being marketed for the frozen food aisles of grocery stores in many parts of the United States.

While pierogi are eaten as a main dish in other countries, Americans typically consider them to be a side dish.

  • The Pittsburgh Pirates hold a pierogi race at every home game.  Six pierogi costume-wearing runners (Potato Pete, Jalapeño Hannah, Cheese Chester, Sauerkraut Saul, Oliver Onion, and Bacon Burt) race to the finish line between innings.
  • Whiting, Indiana celebrates an annual Pierogi Fest each July.
  • Glendon, Alberta, Canada is home to a 6000-pound pierogi which stands 25 feet tall and is made of sturdy fiberglass and steel. Piercing the giant pierogi, which was built in 1991, is an equally giant fork.

Get together with the family and kids and get a little dirty making these starchy delights.

Here are a few recipes to get you going:

Homemade Pierogi

Pierogies

Dessert Pierogi

 

National Chess Day is observed on October 9th.

Chess is a strategic game between two competitors played on a checkered board containing 64 squares. Each player makes moves with 8 pieces each.  The objected of the game is to capture the opponent’s king through a series of strategic moves. When a king is captured, the game ends with checkmate.

The origins of chess are uncertain, but modern chess gained popularity during the Renaissance in Europe.  As complex as the game of chess is from the perspective of a checkered battlefield, it is even more so when considering the nuances of the social underpinnings of privilege, power, trust, rank, an advantage. Each maneuver plays out pawn by pawn, rook, and bishop until the last knight is standing. Until…checkmate!

National Chess Day was declared by President Ford on October 9th, 1976 as part of the nation’s bicentennial celebration. More information can be found on this day due to the work of David Heiser.

For both professionals and amateurs, chess is a game that sharpens the mind, tests human faculties and encourages healthy competition. It has captivated the attention of players and specators world-wide and will continue to do so as long as competition and excellence challenge mankind. ~ President Gerald Ford ~ October 1976

If you know how to play then get the family together and teach the kids this great brain-building game.

 

National Cake Decorating Day is observed annually on October 10. Celebrate with a cake decorated for National Cake Decorating Day!

Many professional cake decorators started their careers as hobbyists. It allows you to express yourself in edible form.  We make or purchase decorated cakes for many of life’s events, from baptisms and birthdays to weddings and anniversaries. Decorated cakes help carry out the theme of any party or event.

It allows you to express yourself in edible form.  We make or purchase decorated cakes for many of life’s events, from baptisms and birthdays to weddings and anniversaries. Decorated cakes help carry out the theme of any party or event.

We make or purchase decorated cakes for many of life’s events, from baptisms and birthdays to weddings and anniversaries. Decorated cakes help carry out the theme of any party or event.

Decorated cakes help carry out the theme of any party or event.

Do you have a party or event coming where you need to make a cake?

Take this opportunity to practice making and decorating a cake or 2 with your kids. Could be a really fun time together.

 

National Fossil Day is observed annually on Wednesday of the second full week in October (11th).

This day was established to promote the scientific and educational values of fossils.

This nationwide celebration was first held on October 13, 2010, during Earth Science Week.

The National Park Service and over 270 partners, including museums, institutions, organizations and other groups hosted events across the United States allowing the public opportunities to learn more about the world’s fossil heritage.

Each year a new National Fossil Day logo is created depicting a prehistoric organism. The logos help to promote National Fossil Day and provide educational opportunities to share more information about fossils. The original National Fossil Day logo was created in 2010 and featured a fossil mammal known as the titanothere. In 2011, the marine reptile known as the mosasaur was used in the National Fossil Day logo. During 2012, the mammoth was featured in the annual logo. For 2013, a Paleozoic invertebrate known as the eurypterid is highlighted in the annual logo.

Each year a new National Fossil Day logo is created and is unveiled in mid-January on the event website. The new logo will highlight another interesting story related to the fossil record of life.

The 2015 National Fossil Day artwork features prehistoric mammal known as a chalicothere depicted in a Miocene prairie grassland.

In 2016, the National Fossil Day artwork features a saber-toothed cat, long-horned bison, and a condor – all Pleistocene (ice age) animals.

Take the kids to the museum and teach them a little about fossils and how they are formed.

 

A day of honor is very much deserved to all of the hard-working farmers.  National Farmer’s Day is observed annually on October 12th as a day for them and to pay tribute to all farmers throughout American history.

National Farmer’s Day was previously known as Old Farmer’s Day.

From very early in American culture, a farmer’s endless hard work has been an example to all of us, and on National Farmer’s Day, we thank them for their contributions to our economy.

There are some cities and towns across the United States that have their own versions of Farmer’s Day, with celebrations and festivals on various dates throughout the year.  Many of them are held in September and October.

October does seem fitting for celebrating National Farmer’s Day as it is near the end of the harvest.  Many farmers will be able to take a rest from their hard labor to join in the celebration of this holiday.

Involve your kids in thanking a farmer for the hard work they do to supply us with good nutritious food.

 

National Train Your Brain Day is observed annually on October 13.

This day was created to encourage everyone to expand and exercise their brain and use more of its potential capacity.  There are many different ways to train your mind and improve your cognitive skills such as reading, word puzzles, number games, brain teasers, trivia games, riddles and word games.  Learning something new is another practice that is a benefit to everyone’s brain on National Train Your Brain Day (as well as any other day).

When the question is asked to American scientists as to how much of the brain is used, the answer varies. However, many of them believe that it is only a small percentage and that there is room for expanded learning and knowledge within everyone.

Do some logic puzzles, brain teasers and riddles to train your brain. Also, test yourself with your children’s school work. See how much you remember. Get them to quiz YOU on this day.

 

People around the country indulge every October 14th on National Dessert Day!  Celebrated by way of the local bakery, grandma’s house or chocolate shop, National Dessert Day includes candies, pies, ice cream, fruits, cookies, pastries, cobblers, and donuts, too.

The available ingredients affect the range of desserts made in each region. The very first desserts required minimal effort or preparation since ancient cultures were more focused on the nutrition in foods to survive. Over the years, desserts have changed from natural candies and nuts to complex souffles and multi-layered cakes. In modern culture, there are many more options available in desserts.

Celebrate this sweet day by going out to a dessert shop or restaurant and indulge in a treat or try one of these delicious recipes.

Pumpkin Ginger Cupcakes
Apple Pie by Grandma Ople
Chocolate Mint Cookies
Hot Fudge Ice Cream Bar
Lemon Cake

 

 

National Grouch Day is observed annually on October 15.  If you are a grouch today is your special day. According to Sesame Street Magazine, National Grouch Day was created for all grouches to celebrate their way of life. Sometimes grumps give backhanded compliments. “Your house looked horrible until you painted it.”  Other times they don’t give them at all.

Sometimes grumps give backhanded compliments. “Your house looked horrible until you painted it.”  Other times they don’t give them at all.  Noise, silence, general activity will make a grouch generally unpleasant.

A grouch is described as:
  • a person who complains frequently or constantly
  • a habitually irritable or complaining person

It seems that a grouch may be happy (although they would never admit it) only when others are unhappy and grouchy.

It is then that they feel most comfortable with having others share in their grumpy, cantankerous, surly world with them.

National Grouch Day would be a good time to send a grouch e-card and then ask a friend, whether they be a grouch or not, to come on over, sit back, share some popcorn, relax and watch the movie Grumpy Old Men!

This Sesame Street inspired holiday has been celebrated since at least 1976.

Do you have a grouch in your family? Celebrate this grouchy day by trying to cheer them up or at least make them smile.

 

National Dictionary Day is observed annually on October 16.

Celebrate by learning a little bit of dictionary history and about Noah Webster:

In 1806, American Noah Webster published his first dictionary, A Compendious Dictionary of the English Language. In 1807 Webster began compiling an expanded and fully comprehensive dictionary, An American Dictionary of the English Language; it took twenty-seven years to complete. To evaluate the etymology of words, Webster learned twenty-six languages, including Old English (Anglo-Saxon), German, Greek, Latin, Italian, Spanish, French, Hebrew, Arabic, and Sanskrit.

Webster completed his dictionary during his year abroad in Paris, France, at the University of Cambridge.  His book contained seventy thousand words, of which twelve thousand had never appeared in a published dictionary before.

As a spelling reformer, he believed that the English spelling rules were unnecessarily complex so in his dictionary he introduced American English spellings, replacing “colour” with “color”, substituting “wagon” for “waggon” and printing “center” instead of “centre”.  Webster also added American words such as “skunk” and “squash” that did not appear in British dictionaries.  He believed The United States “should be as independent in literature as she is in politics.”  Some of his changes didn’t catch on, however.  Dropping the silent “e” from the end of some words like the word imagine.

Webster took a more phonetic approach to the development of his dictionary.  Interestingly, the word didn’t appear when Webster published his dictionary in 1828 at the age of seventy. However, of the 70,000 entries, the word phonics is one. The dictionary sold 2500 copies. In 1840, the second edition was published in two volumes. Webster’s 1828 Dictionary is available online.  By entering the modern-day spelling, the website will produce Webster’s 1828 version.

Make a game with your kids. Think of words that are spelled in a silly way and look them up to see if they’ve always been sp[elled that way. Try to make up words that you don’t think are real and see what happens.

 

October 17th is National Pasta Day.

Pasta lovers celebrate!
Pasta is a type of noodle of traditional Italian cuisine, with the first reference dating to 1154 in Sicily and first attested in English in 1874. Typically, it is made from unleavened dough of durum wheat flour that is mixed with water or eggs and formed into sheets or various shapes. It can then be served fresh or dried to be stored for later use.
The versatility of pasta lends it to sweet and savory dishes.  It can be featured as the main dish, a light, fresh side or even the anticipated rich finish as the dessert.
Fresh pasta was originally produced by hand but, today, many varieties of fresh pasta are commercially produced by large-scale machines and the products are widely available in supermarkets.
  • Dried and fresh pasta come in a number of shapes and varieties.
  • There are 310 specific forms known variably by over 1300 names having been recently documented.
  • In Italy, names of specific pasta shapes or types vary with locale.
  • Example:  Cavatelli is known by 28 different names depending on the region and town.

Learn more about pasta from the National Pasta Association at http://ilovepasta.org/

 

 

National Chocolate Cupcake Day is observed annually on October 18. With a dollop of frosting, one sweet serving will satisfy chocolate and dessert lovers!

Cupcakes have also been known to be called:

  • Fairy Cakes
  • Patty Cakes
  • Cup Cakes (different from Cupcakes (one-word)

Cupcakes can be traced back to 1796 when there was a recipe notation of “a cake to be baked in small cups” written in American Cookery, by Amelia Simmons.  The earliest known documentation of the term cupcake was in 1828 in Seventy-five Receipts for Pastry, Cakes, and Sweetmeats in Eliza Leslie’s Receipts cookbook.

Cupcakes were originally baked in heavy pottery cups.  Today, some bakers still use individual ramekins, small coffee mugs, large teacups, or other small ovenproof pottery-type dishes for baking their cupcakes.

To celebrate National Chocolate Cupcake Day, try one of the following tempting recipes while watching an episode of the Food Network reality-based competition show, Cupcake Wars.

Cream Cheese Chocolate Cupcakes
Chocolate Fudge Cupcakes with Peanut Butter Frosting
Dark Chocolate Cupcakes

Do you have a seafood lover in the family? Anyone that doesn’t particularly like seafood? Get them onboard with National Seafood Bisque Day is observed annually on October 19. Seafood lovers celebrate by enjoying a bowl of tasty soup made from the catch of the day!

Seafood bisque is a smooth, creamy and highly-seasoned soup of French origin.   Based on a strained broth of crustaceans, it is made from lobster, crab, shrimp or crayfish.

The name “Bisque” is likely derived from Biscay, as in Bay of Biscay. However, the crustaceans are certainly bis cuites, meaning “twice cooked”, as they are first sauteed lightly in their shells, then simmered in wine or cognac and aromatic herbs before being strained.

To celebrate National Seafood Bisque Day, try one of the following Seafood Bisque recipes or take the family out to your favorite seafood restaurant.

Elegant Seafood Bisque
Simple Seafood Bisque

 

Let’s get a day for the parents to relax and enjoy. National Brandied Fruit Day is observed annually on October 20.

Brandied fruit is fresh, sweet fruit that is soaked in brandy and sugar, which is then used as a topping on pies, cake or ice cream. Brandy, which has been around since about the 12th century, is distilled from fermented fruit.

To celebrate National Brandied Fruit Day, enjoy one of the following recipes:

 

Each year on October 21, people across the nation observe National Reptile Awareness Day.  Created not only for reptile lovers to celebrate, but National Reptile Awareness Day also promotes education, conservation, and appreciation for reptiles. It is a day to learn about their natural habitats and the ecological threats that they are facing.

A reptile is any amniote (lay their eggs on land or retain the fertilized egg within the mother) that is neither a mammal nor a bird, is cold-blooded, has scales or scutes (thick bony or horny plates which form the dermal layer of such reptiles).  There are more than 10,000 species of reptiles.

Take the kids to the zoo to see some reptiles or do some research on them and have some fun coloring these reptile pages.

 

 

National Color Day is observed annually on October 22.  Color has the power to affect a mood, draw attention, even cause alarm.

It is hard to imagine the world without color. Without color, we would nearly be blind.  Doctors check for health through the color of a patient’s skin.

On a cool late summer morning, sparkling frost and leaves changing from green to vermillion signal a change of seasons.

A flush of color in the cheeks of friend sends a cue of her embarrassment.

The street light turns from green to yellow, to red.

Color accents our homes and feeds our creativity, allows us to express ourselves.

Open a box of crayons or watercolors and artists of any age loose themselves in a world of their own creation for hours.

Different colors are perceived to mean different things. Following is one rendition of perceived meaning of the various colors in the United States.

  • Red:  Excitement – Love – Strength
  • Yellow:  Competence – Happiness
  • Green:  Good Taste – Envy – Relaxation
  • Blue:  Corporate – High Quality
  • Pink: Sophistication – Sincerity
  • Violet/Purple:  Authority – Power
  • Brown:  Ruggedness – earth
  • Black:  Grief – Fear
  • White: Happiness – Purity

Encourage the family to dress in their favorite bright colors today and admire all the wonderful colors around you.

 

National Boston Cream Pie Day is observed annually on October 23.  Let’s celebrate the cake with an identity crisis! Boston Cream Pie is a chocolate frosted, custard filled cake that is loved by millions.

In 1856, at Boston’s Parker House Hotel, Armenian-French chef M. Sanzian created this pudding and cake combination which comprises two layers of sponge cake filled with vanilla flavored custard or creme patisserie.  The cake is then topped with a chocolate glaze, such as a ganache or sometimes powdered sugar and a cherry.

In 1996, Massachusetts declared the Boston Cream Pie as their official dessert.

Celebrate National Boston Creme Pie Day with a slice of homemade Boston Creme Pie made from one of the following recipes:

Boston Cream Pie
Outrageous Boston Cream Pie Cupcakes
Boston Cream Pie Minis
Boston Cream Poke Cake

 

Each year on October 24, people across the nation make a sandwich to take part in National Bologna Day.  This would be a good day to have a bologna sandwich for lunch.

  • Sometimes spelled baloney (as it is pronounced), Bologna has been one of the more popular luncheon meats for decades.
  • Favorite bologna sandwich garnishes are mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, cheese, lettuce, pickles, tomato, and onion.
  • Bologna is derived from and is somewhat similar to the Italian mortadella (a finely hashed/ground port sausage) that originated in Bologna, Italy.
  • United States government regulations require American bologna to be finely ground and without visible pieces of lard.
  • Bologna can alternatively be made out of chicken, turkey, beef, pork, venison or soy protein.
  • Bologna Bowl – When a slice of bologna is heated, the fat renders and the round slice takes the shape of a bowl which may be filled with cheese or other fillings.

There is a variety of different types of bologna:

German Bologna
Kosher or halal bologna
Lebanon bologna
Lauantaimakkara
Rag bologna
South African polony
Vegetarian

To celebrate National Bologna Day, encourage your family to try something new and enjoy one of  these bologna recipes:

Fried Bologna Casserole
Fried Bologna, Egg on Challah Bread with an American Cheese Rarebit Sauce
Big Daddy’s Prize Winning Bologna Sandwich
Barbecued Bologna

 

Those watching the scale beware. Augment the diet for National Greasy Foods Day on October 25th.

Although not the healthiest of choices, every once in awhile it is okay to enjoy some greasy food.  From fried chicken, pizza, nachos, and french fries to bacon and hash brown potatoes, we all like a treat in our regular diet.

Cooking oil types include:

Olive oil – Palm oil – Soybean oil – Canola oil – Pumpkin oil – Corn oil – Sunflower oil – Safflower oil – Peanut oil – Grapeseed oil – Sesame oil – Agran oil – Rice bran oil – Other vegetable oils – Butter and lard.

Oil may be flavored with aromatic flavorings such as herbs, chilies or garlic.

Greasy foods can be prepared with healthier oils and with much less than normal amounts of oil used when cooking, making them much healthier choices.

Indulge yourself a little with some greasy foods. You could try some of these recipes:

Perfect French Fries

Fried Green Tomatoes

Fried Mozzarella Cheese Sticks

Skillet Fried Chicken

 

 

We recognize a favored autumn decoration and food on October 26th that is used in a variety of recipes, competitions, and festivals. It’s National Pumpkin Day!

By October 26th, we are in a frenzy of pumpkin obsession. We cannot wait for the big November holiday for pumpkin pie.  No siree, we need pumpkin ev-ery-thing! (We already know how I feel about this) Bars, cookies, coffee, cheesecake, pasta and oatmeal.

Pumpkin Chunkin’, pumpkin patches, festivals, bake-offs and television specials. Let’s not forget jack-o-lantern carving, too! This fruit grabs American’s attention.

As it should be.  This squash is native to  North America. The oldest evidence of pumpkin-related seeds dates back to somewhere between 7000 and 5500 BC to seeds found in Mexico.

Within recent years, white pumpkins have become more popular in the United States.

The United States produces 1.5 billion pounds of pumpkins, with Illinois producing more than any other state.

Go out to your favorite Pumpkin patch and pick a few good sized pumpkins and enjoy one of the following recipes:

Pumpkin Lasagna
Savory Pumpkin Raviolo
Pumpkin Pudding

Or you could try your hand at carving those pumpkins with these tutorials:

How to carve a pumpkin

How to carve the perfect Halloween Pumpkin

 

 

October 27 may be National Black Cat Day, but it is all about celebrating the beauty of these sleek creatures.

 

 

While this time of year black cats may decorate many thresholds for Halloween and windows for spooky decor, these felines deserve the love and attention just as much as their tabby counterparts.

Old notions have given these furry critters a bad reputation.  National Black Cat Day is about turning that reputation around.

If you are a cat lover and considering adopting, don’t overlook the ebony to go with your ivory.

Knock those irrational fears to the door and open your home to the dark side!

Cats Protection, an animal charity in the United Kingdom, founded National Black Cat Day to raise awareness concerning the lower rates of adoption for black cats.

Show the kids that cats, especially black cats, can be very nice and sweet.

 

 

National Make A Difference Day is an annual community service event which is held on the fourth Saturday in October.

Millions of people have united in the common mission to improve the lives of others.

USA Weekend is a national weekend newspaper magazine which is distributed through more than 800 newspapers in the United States and published by Gannett Company as a sister publication to USA Today.  USA Weekend’s focus is on social issues, entertainment, health, food and travel. USA Weekend, along with Points of Light, have been sponsoring National Make a Difference Day, the largest national day of community service, for more than twenty years.

National Make a Difference Day was created in 1992 by USA WEEKEND magazine and joined by Points of Light.  Together they have sponsored the largest national day of community service for more than twenty years.

Get the whole family involved and do what you can to make a difference.

 

National Oatmeal Day is observed annually on October 29th. This is a day to enjoy one of America’s favorite breakfast foods. 

There are many health benefits to eating oatmeal.

  • A bowl of oatmeal daily can lower cholesterol.
  • It may reduce the risk of heart disease.
  • It may reduce your risk for cancer. (according to the American Cancer Society, eating a diet high in fiber may help reduce your risk for cancer)
  • Oatmeal is low in fat.
  • Oatmeal is low in calories.
  • Oatmeal is a good source iron and fiber.

Some favorite oatmeal toppings include brown sugar, sugar, cinnamon, peaches, blueberries, strawberries, bananas, nuts, and granola.

Oatmeal has a long tradition in the state of Vermont which originated within the Scottish settlement.  Although there were many variations, most oatmeal recipes began with steel cut oats.

The oats were soaked overnight in cold water, salt and maple syrup. Early the next morning, the cook would add ground nutmeg, ground cinnamon and, occasionally, ground ginger.  The pot was then placed over heat and cooked for approximately 90 minutes. The oatmeal was served steaming hot with cream, milk or butter. 

The Quaker Man is one of the oldest advertising mascots in America.  He was registered by the Quaker Oats company as the first trademark for a breakfast cereal in 1877.

Enjoy a nice bowl of oatmeal this morning.

 

National Candy Corn Day is observed annually on October 30th.

Candy Corn was created by George Renninger of Wunderle Candy Company in the late 1800s. He created this sweet treat to represent the bright colors of corn kernels.   Originally, Candy Corn was yellow, orange and white, but it has become popular in other colors as well.

This confection was originally made by hand using corn syrup, sugar, water, marshmallows, fondant and carnauba wax (a wax made from the leaves of a palm tree), but it is now produced using machines.  The original ingredients are still used in the recipe.

Whether you want to go whip up a batch or go and purchase a bag, go and enjoy National Candy Corn Day.

Homemade Candy Corn

 

 

On October 31st ghouls and goblins, creatures and strange folk come creeping about the neighborhood seeking favors over trickery. This holiday tradition has become known as Halloween.

Typical festive Halloween activities include trick-or-treating, attending costume parties, decorating, carving pumpkins into jack-o’-lanterns, lighting bonfires, apple bobbing, visiting haunted house attractions, playing pranks, telling scary stories and watching horror films.

In many parts of the world, the Christian religious observances of All Hallows’ Eve, including attending church services and lighting candles on the graves of the dead, remain popular.

Although, in other locations, these solemn customs are less pronounced in favor of a more commercialized and secularized celebration.

Because many Western Christian denominations encourage, although no longer require, abstinence from meat on All Hallows’ Eve, the tradition of eating certain vegetarian foods for this vigil day developed, including the consumption of apples, colcannon, cider, potato pancakes, and soul cakes.

Dating back to an ancient pagan harvest festival marking the end of summer and beckoning the beginning of winter, seasons overlapped during Samhain (pronounced sah-win) and revelers believed the worlds of the living and the dead crossed. To interact with the spirits, the living would wear costumes and light bright bonfires to help protect them.

To interact with the spirits, the living would wear costumes and light bright bonfires to help protect them.

Similar celebrations honoring the dead took place in Roman traditions which were gradually blended and soon replaced the Celtic ceremonies.  All Martyrs Day established by Pope Boniface IV in 609 A.D. was eventually moved by Pope Gregory III to November 1 which later became known as All Saint’s Day. The eve of this celebration became known as All Hallows Eve or Halloween.

Through the Colonial era in America, Halloween celebrations were considered taboo due to religious beliefs. By the Victorian era, though, Halloween traditions featured fall festivals,

 

By the Victorian era, though, Halloween traditions featured fall festivals, parties, and foods involving communities and neighborhoods.

 

I hope everyone has a happy and safe October. Be especially careful while you’re out celebrating your Halloween festivities.

Let me know in the comments what days you will plan to celebrate this October.

Share this with your Fall loving friends and family.

Hello, my name is Kristen Osborne I am a happy mother of one beautiful little girl. Very into the internet and trying out new things.

10 Replies to “Super Fun Days in October to Celebrate with the Family”

  1. I love all of these (ok, maybe especially taco day!) and you gave me some serious inspo not just on celebrating in October, but also for great Insta posts on celebrating the month!

    1. Yes! I’m so glad. These everyday celebrations make it so easy to think of fun social media posts when you don’t really have anything planned for certain days 🙂

  2. Wow, this article is packed full of interesting information! Loved the dalmations… totally forgot about them being fire dogs for awhile.
    Love the child wellness holiday also. 💜 and the noodles and do something kind.. etc. A lot of meaningful days in october. Even the less meaningful food ones have an interesting backstory.
    Thanks for taking the time to research and share this with us. 😊 Also, These Wonderful Apple Cider Donuts You Speak of… I must find them!

    1. Usually, if you have an apple orchard near you that allows you to pick your own apples or has a farmers market they will more than likely have the apple cider donuts.

      We get ours at Linvilla Orchards in Media, Pa.
      So tasty and I also recommend the Orange Marmalade 🙂

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