Super Fun Family Friendly Days to Celebrate in November

celebrate november

I know I’ve said it before but Fall is rapidly becoming my favorite season. The older I get, the less I can stand the heat of the summer. Although I absolutely hate Winter, nothing about it appeals to me in any way. But, Fall is the middle ground that is just alright with me.

That being said, here is the list of November National days and I KNOW you are going to get a kick out of these days. There are some really great activities this month.

november national days

NOVEMBER NATIONAL DAYS

National Family Literacy Day is observed each year on November 1.

This day boasts special activities and events that showcase the importance of family literacy programs.

National Literacy Day kicks off National Literacy Month in November.

During the month of November, there are many events which are held at schools, libraries and other literacy organizations.

Get together with family and read a book together or try some other fun activity that involves reading together.

 

Each year on November 2 is National Broadcast Traffic Professional’s Day.

This day honors those in all radio and television traffic departments, who schedule and work very diligently with programs, announcements and much more, on our nation’s broadcast stations

The first commercial broadcast took place on KDKA radio out of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on November 2, 1920.  Also known as National Traffic Directors Day or National Traffic Professional’s Day, it honors the thousands of professionals directors in broadcast media since that day who have worked behind the scenes keeping the entertainment, talk shows, news, and commercials flowing.  Through breaking news alerts, stormy weather, budgets and differing personalities, these men and women maintain program development.

Thank a traffic director today.

National Sandwich Day is observed every year on November 3. The sandwich is believed to be the namesake of John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich, following the claim that he was the inventor of the sandwich.  This day honors one of America’s most popular lunch items.

While the modern sandwich is believed to be named after John Montagu, the exact circumstances of its invention and original use are the subjects of debate.  There is a rumor in a contemporary travel book titled Tour to London, by Pierre Jean Grosley, that formed the popular myth that bread and meat sustained Lord Sandwich at the gambling table.

It is said that Lord Sandwich was a very conversant gambler and did not take the time to have a meal during his long hours playing at the card table.  When hungry, he would ask his servants to bring him slices of meat between two slices of bread.  This practice was a habit which was well known to his gambling friends who soon began to order “the same as Sandwich,” and from this, the sandwich was born.

N.A.M. Rodger, who wrote Sandwich’s biography, suggests that because of Sandwich’s commitment to the navy, politics and the arts the first sandwich was more likely to have been consumed at his work desk.

Before being known as sandwiches, the food seems just to have been known as bread and meat or bread and cheese.

Some of the most common sandwiches include BLT – Cheese Sandwich – Philadelphia Cheesesteak – Club Sandwich – Dagwood – French Dip – Hamburger – Monte Cristo – Muffuletta – Peanut Butter & Jelly Sandwich – Pilgrim – Po’boy – Reuben – Sloppy Joe – Submarine – Tuna Fish Sandwich – Veggie Sandwich – Deli Sandwich

Go out for a sandwich with the kids or enjoy one of the following sandwich recipes together:

California Grilled Veggie Sandwich
BBQ Pork for Sandwiches
Real N’awlins Muffuletta
Shrimp Po’ Boys

 

National Candy Day is observed on November 4th.

Candies come in numerous colors, shapes, sizes, and varieties and have a long history in popular culture.

People use the term candy as a broad category that includes candy bars, chocolates, licorice, sour candies, salty candies, tart candies, hard candies, taffies, gumdrops, marshmallows and much more.

Way back in time, before sugar was readily available, candy was made from honey.  The honey was used to coat fruits and flowers to preserve them or to create forms of candy.

There is still candy that is served in this way today, but it is typically seen as a garnish.

Originally a form of medicine, candy calmed the digestive system or cooled a sore throat.  At this time, combined with spices and sugar, candy only appeared in the purses and the dishes of the wealthy.

It was in the 18th century that the first candy is believed to have come to America from Britain and France.

At this time, the simplest form of candy was Rock Candy made from crystallized sugar. However, even the basic form of sugar was considered a luxury and was only attainable by the wealthy.

Since 1979, the world has produced more sugar than can be sold, making it very attainable and cheap.

When the technological advances and the availability of sugar opened up the market in the 1830s, the candy business underwent a drastic change.

Candy was not only for the enjoyment of the well to do but the pleasure of everyone.  Penny candies became popular, targeting children.

  • 1847 – Invention of the candy press making it possible to produce multiple shapes and sizes of candy at one time.
  • 1851 – Confectioners began using a revolving steam pan to assist in boiling sugar.

The two top-selling candies in America have been:

  • M & M’S — M&M’s are milk chocolate drops with a colorful candy coating on the outside. The candies were first manufactured in 1941 and were given to American soldiers serving in the Second World War. M&M’s are produced by Mars Inc.
  • Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups — Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups are round chocolate disks that are filled with a sweet, creamy peanut butter filling. The cups were first manufactured in 1928 by the Hershey’s company.

Grab a pack of your kids favorite candy and enjoy as a family.

 

November 5 is one of two National Doughnut Days observed by doughnut lovers across the nation. The first Friday in June is the other day doughnuts steal the bakery case spotlight ready to tease their way into white bakery box home!

The history of the doughnut is disputed:

  • One theory suggests Dutch settlers brought doughnuts to North America much like they brought other traditional American desserts including cookies, apple pie, cream pie, and cobbler.
  • An American, Hanson Gregory, claimed to have invented the ring-shaped doughnut in 1847 while on board a lime-trading ship at the age of 16.  According to Gregory, he punched a hole in the center of dough with the ship’s tin pepper box and later taught the technique to his mother.
  • Anthropologist Paul R Mullins states the first cookbook mentioning doughnuts was an 1803 English volume which included doughnuts in an appendix of American recipes.
  • An 1808 short story describing a spread of “fire-cakes and dough-nuts” is the earliest known recorded usage of the term doughnut.
  • A more commonly cited first written recording of the word is Washington Irving’s reference to doughnuts in 1809 in his History of New York.  He described balls of sweetened dough, fried in hog’s fat and called doughnuts.  Today, these nuts of fried dough are called doughnut holes.

Donut versus Doughnut

  • Print ads for cake and glazed donuts and doughnuts existed from at least 1896 in the United States.
  • Peck’s Bad Boy and his Pa, written by George W. Peck and published in 1900, contained the first known printed use of donut. In it, a character is quoted as saying, “Pa said he guessed he hadn’t got much appetite and he would just drink a cup of coffee and eat a donut.”
  • In 1919, the Square Donut Company of America was founded, offering an easier to package product.

The more traditional spelling is doughnut. However, both doughnut and donut are pervasive in American English.

While doughnuts come in a large variety of recipes, flavors, and toppings, just like many pastries, we are only limited by imagination and ingredients at hand.  From syrups and jellies to sprinkles and custards, top them, fill them, bake them or fry them, doughnuts have a mouth-watering way of glazing and dusting their way into our shopping carts and finding their way to the break room at work to share.

Use this…

and try making your own, or use one of the following recipes:

Best Baked Doughnuts Ever
Easy Drop Doughnuts
Easy Doughnuts
Chocolate Doughnuts

 

National Nachos Day is observed annually on November 6. In their simplest form, nachos are tortilla chips covered in nacho cheese or other melted cheese and served with salsa.

First created sometime around 1943, the popular and loved nachos are of Mexican origin.  Nachos can be made quickly and served as a snack, an appetizer or prepared with extra ingredients as a full meal.

It is believed that Ignaci “Nacho” Anaya created the original nachos in the city of Piedras Negras, Coahuila, Mexico, just across the border from Eagle Pass, Texas.  The story talks of a group of United States military wives stationed at Fort Duncan in Eagle Pass who traveled to Piedras Negras on a shopping trip.  Following shopping, they arrived late to a restaurant after it had closed for the day.  Maître d, Ignacio “Nacho” Anaya served them a snack which he invented from what little was available in the kitchen: tortillas and cheese.  Anaya cut the tortillas into triangles, topped them with shredded cheddar cheese and quickly heated them.  He then added sliced jalapeno peppers and served them to the ladies. When Anaya was asked what the dish was called, he replied, “Nacho’s especiales”.  As the word of this new creation traveled, people tried them, loved them and over time, the name changed and Nacho’s “specials” became “special nachos”.

The original recipe is printed in the 1954 St. Anne’s Cookbook.

The popularity of the new dish spread swiftly throughout Texas and the Southwest and has since gained millions of fans across America.

Some favorite nachos toppings are refried beans, ground beef, shredded beef, chicken, seafood, shredded cheese, jalapeno peppers, green pepper,  lettuce, tomatoes, black olives, onion, sour cream, and guacamole.

Check out this cookbook dedicated to nachos…

 

National Bittersweet Chocolate with Almonds Day is observed each year on November 7th.

Bittersweet chocolate is chocolate liquor to which sugar, cocoa butter, and vanilla have been added.  It has less sugar and more liquor than semisweet chocolate. However, the two of them may be interchangeable when baking.

Recent studies have revealed health benefits from eating small quantities of bittersweet chocolate. Almonds have health benefits as well. Pairing the two of them together gives us a delicious and healthful snack to be enjoyed on this fall day.

In 1742, Eliza Smith included the only chocolate recipe in her cookbook The Compleat Housewife printed by William Parks. The simple recipe combined grated chocolate, orange flower water, and sugar.

If that doesn’t peak your interest then check out a few of these recipes:

Bittersweet Chocolate Bark with Marcona Almonds
Bittersweet Chocolate and Almond Cake
Chocolate Dipped Almond Anise Biscotti
The Perfect Chocolate Chip Cookies (Whole Wheat)

 

November 8 is a day meant to inspire kids to explore and pursue their interests in Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math.

Why is S.T.E.M./S.T.E.A.M. so important, now more than ever before?

·         S.T.E.M./S.T.E.A.M. is all around us and shapes our everyday experiences

·         Of the U.S. Labor Department‘s predicted 10 fastest growing occupations, nearly all of them are S.T.E.M./S.T.E.A.M. careers; therefore an interest in S.T.E.M./S.T.E.A.M. early on can lead to success later on in life

·         The U.S. has fallen behind other nations in science and math education; we need to motivate young kids to pursue these subjects to keep up with the rest of the world

·         We must close the gender gap that exists in S.T.E.M./S.T.E.A.M. related-careers. Building interest in girls is critical to their future earning potential.

Get your girls and boys involved with learning Math and Science today, no matter how young they are, it is never too early to learn.

 

National Scrapple Day is observed annually on November 9th. Scrapple is arguably the first pork food invented in America.

For those who are not familiar with scrapple, it is traditionally a mush of pork scraps and trimmings combined with cornmeal, wheat flour, and spices.  (The spices may include but are not limited to sage, thyme, savory and black pepper.)  The mush is then formed into a semi-solid loaf, sliced and pan-fried.

I know it doesn’t sound very appetizing for those who don’t know what it is, but I assure you it tastes fantastic!

It was in the 17th and 18th centuries that the first recipes for scrapple were created by Dutch colonists who settled near Philadelphia and Chester County, Pennsylvania.   Hence the origin of its discovery, it is strongly associated with rural areas surrounding Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington D.C., eastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware, eastern Virginia and the Delmarva Peninsula.

  • Scrapple can be found in supermarkets throughout the area in both refrigerated and frozen cases.
  • Home recipes for beef, chicken and turkey scrapple are available.
  • Scrapple is sometimes deep-fried or broiled instead of pan frying.
  • Scrapple is typically eaten as a breakfast side dish.
  • Condiments are sometimes served with scrapple, some of which include apple butter, ketchup, jelly, maple syrup, honey, horseradish or mustard.

Have some scrapple. Following are a few scrapple recipes for you to try:

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/scrapple/
http://www.cooks.com/recipe/pt6o151m/scrapple.html
http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/359/ChickenScrapple61687.shtml

 

National Vanilla Cupcake Day is observed annually on November 10. This is a day for dessert lovers across the country to celebrate and indulge.

Cupcakes have also been known to be called:

  • Fairy Cakes
  • Patty Cakes
  • Cup Cakes (different from Cupcakes (one-word)

Cupcakes can be traced back to 1796 when a recipe notation of a cake to be baked in small cups was written in American Cookery (by Amelia Simmons).  The earliest known documentation of the term cupcake was in 1828 in Seventy-five Receipts for Pastry, Cakes, and Sweetmeats in Eliza Leslie’s Receipts cookbook.

Cupcakes were originally baked in heavy pottery cups.  Today, some bakers still use individual ramekins, small coffee mugs, larger teacups, or other small ovenproof pottery-type dishes for baking their cupcakes.

To celebrate National Vanilla Cupcake Day, share some cupcakes with your friends and family. Make one or all of the following vanilla cupcake recipes.

Classic Vanilla Cupcakes
Raspberry Filled Vanilla Cupcakes
Sour Cream Cupcakes

 

National Sundae Day is observed each year on November 11.  Ice cream lovers across the country will celebrate all day, enjoying one (or more) of the most famous ice cream dessert, the ice cream sundae.

An ice cream sundae typically consists of one or two scoops of ice cream topped with syrup or sauce.  The sundae is often topped with whipped cream, maraschino cherry, sprinkles, pineapple or a variety of other toppings.

The oldest known record of an ice cream sundae is an advertisement in the Ithica Daily Journal dated October 5, 1892, with the conventional day of the week spelling – Sunday.

It has been hotly debated where the sundae originated.  There has been a friendly rivalry between Ithica, New York, and Two Rivers, Wisconsin over which city is the true birthplace of the sundae.

The Two Rivers’ claim is that in 1881, Druggist Edward Berners served the sweet concoction when customer George Hallauer ordered an ice cream soda.  Because it was the Sabbath, ice cream sodas were prohibited at that time.  As a compromise, Berners served the ice cream in a dish without soda and topped it with chocolate syrup.  This story is disputed by some because Berners would have only been 18 at the time the story takes place.

 

National Chicken Soup for the Soul Day is observed each year on November 12.  According to our research, this day was created to celebrate who you are, where you have been, where you are going and who you will be thankful to when you get there.   

Chicken Soup for the Soul is a publisher and consumer goods company founded in 1993 with its headquarters in Cos Cob, Connecticut. The first book, as most subsequent titles in the series, was of true stories written by ordinary people about their own lives and soon became a best-seller.

National  Chicken Soup for the Soul Day is a celebration about you!

                  

 

On November 13 as part of World Kindness Day, we are encouraged to spread kindness like an infectious cold. We want to share it more than usual because studies show when others observe kindness in action they are more likely to carry out an act of kindness, too.

So, imagine if you head out for the day and your neighbor’s garbage can has tipped over. Instead of ignoring it and letting the wind make a mess, you pick it up and return it to the corner. Three other neighbors notice and give you a smile and a nod on their way to work.

One of those neighbors notices a stranded driver on the side of the road on his commute to work. He remembers your thoughtfulness and offers assistance to the stranded driver. Several passersby take notice.

At a business office, a woman struggles with a paper jam. She’s had a horrible day. The customer has been waiting, but she remembers the stranded driver she passed earlier in the day. The customer lets the office worker know to take her time. Everyone has a bad day.

We each have the potential to improve each others lives through understanding and kindness. Whether it’s a friend, family member, coworker or stranger, our ability to show our humanity should have no limit.

On World Kindness Day, let your compassion shine brightly.  Get caught showing as much kindness as possible.

For inspiration on leading a life of kindness, Orly Wahba has written a book and her organization Life Vest Inside produced a short film called Kindness Boomerang.

 

The World Kindness Movement started World Kindness Day in 1998 and has spread to 28 countries.

 

National Pickle Day is observed annually on November 14. It may be a Dill, Gherkin, Cornichon, Brined, Kosher Dill, Polish, Hungarian, Lime, Bread and Butter, Swedish and Danish, or Kool-Aid Pickle. Whichever is your choice, eat them all day long.

The term pickle comes from the Dutch word pekel, meaning brine.  In the United States, the word pickle typically refers to a pickled cucumber.

– Each year in the United States, 5,200,000 pounds of pickles are consumed.

– Pickles are a great snack, low in calories and a good source of vitamin K, though they can be high in sodium.

– When served on a stick at festivals, fairs or carnivals, pickles are sometimes known as “stick pickles”.

– A rising trend in the United States is deep-fried pickles which have a breading or batter surrounding the pickle spear or slice.

– For thousands of years, pickles have been a popular food dating back to 2030 B.C.  At that time, cucumbers were imported from India to the Tigris Valley where they were first preserved and eaten as pickles.

– Cleopatra attributed her good looks to her diet of pickles.

– Julius Caesar fed pickles to his troops believing that they lent physical and spiritual strength.

 

Each year on November 15, millions of people across the United States take part in America Recycles Day, a day which was created to raise awareness about recycling and the purchasing of recycled products.

Recycle, buy recycled goods and help teach others the benefits of recycling and continue to do so each day!

America Recycles Day was started in 1997 by the National Recycling Coalition and is declared each year by Presidential Proclamation, encouraging Americans to commit to recycling.  Since 2009, this day has been a program of Keep America Beautiful.  There are thousands of events that are held across the United States to raise awareness about the importance of recycling and offering personal pledges that can be signed, committing to recycling and buying products made from recycled materials.

 

National Button Day is observed annually on November 16. Founded in 1938, the National Button Society recognized button collecting as an organized hobby. Both novice and advanced button collectors celebrate the enjoyment collecting on this day.

Do you remember your grandmother or your mother snipping the buttons off shirts that were headed for the rag basket and then collecting them in jars? Maybe you even played games or strung them for ornaments and crafts.  The buttons were fun to stack into piles, sort by color or size, or scatter/slide across the floor or table making up different games each time.

Crafters across the country utilize buttons in creative ways and are some of the best at finding new uses for old items. There are thousands of button collectors in the United States.

 

National Take a Hike Day is observed annually on November 17.  With over 60,000 miles of trails in the National Trail System across the 50 states, there is no lack of opportunity to take a hike.

Events around the country are scheduled today to celebrate Take a Hike Day.  Hiking can burn between 400-550 calories per hour. What better way to get a head start on all those ‘other’ holiday temptations and observe Take a Hike Day?  Be sure to wear good shoes, take a snack and bring a buddy, but get out there and enjoy the fresh air, scenery and get a little exercise to boot!

This is such a beautiful time of year to go out in the crisp air and walk among nature. Get the family up and out to get their blood flowing and hike around some trails.

 

Making his debut on November 18, 1928, we commemorate the birth of that ever lovable mouse that was once a rabbit called Oswald. To get to the beginning of the story, we have to go back to 1927 when Walt Disney first sketched a floppy eared bunny while under contract to Universal Studios. The events that unraveled brought us Mickey Mouse.

Wish Mickey Mouse a Happy Birthday and celebrate a little with your Mickey loving little ones.

Mickey Mouse came to be under the roller coaster events of Oswald’s success and Universal’s disappointing contract negotiations. Disney Bros. Studio took their leave of both the studio and Oswald and set to work creating a character who would go on to lead the company into the future.

From a rabbit named Oswald to a mouse named Mortimer, eventually, the little squeaky-voiced guy was dubbed Mickey. He flopped in two animated short films without any success.

Then on November 18, 1928, Mickey’s star was born. The first animation synchronized to music and sound effects, Steamboat Willie premiered in New York.

Within a year, a Mickey Mouse Club popped up in Salem, Oregon. This particular club offered admission as a fundraiser for the Salvation Army with a donation of either a potato or a small toy and a penny. According to December 22, 1929, Statesman Journal (Salem, Oregon) article, $12 and three truckloads of potatoes and toys collected by eager new members.

Remember, the stock market crashed just 20 days before Mickey Mouse was born. That a cute little mouse could bring smiles to the faces of children at an uncertain time really isn’t such a surprise.

Generally, new members joined the club by completing an admission form obtained from a local merchant and attending meetings held during matinees at local movie houses. The price of admission often was reduced for good deeds and report cards. By the end of 1930, the Mickey Mouse Clubs had spread across the country.

Now, there is a new “Club Mickey Mouse” but, instead of a show on television, they make posts on Facebook and Instagram.

Club Mickey Mouse FB Page

Club Mickey Mouse Instagram

In 1935, animator Fred Moore gave Mickey a new look that enabled a more fluid movement to the animation.

A makeover in 1935 by animator Fred Moore gave Mickey the look we are familiar with today. The big eyes, white gloves, and the pert little nose. More lovable than ever before, he propelled himself even further into the hearts of children everywhere.

His companions Minnie, Donald, Goofy, and Pluto joined him along the way, bringing vaudevillian comedy with them.

 

National Play Monopoly Day is observed every year on November 19.

Known as one of the most popular board games in the world, the game that was originally based on a board game designed by Elizabeth Magie in 1902, Monopoly has been played by an estimated more than 5 million people since 1935.

Gather your family and friends together and play Monopoly.

 

National Absurdity Day is observed annually on November 20.

This day was created as a day to recall and note some of the entirely off the wall and ridiculous things in history, in our country and our lives.

National Absurdity Day is also a day to have fun and do crazy, zany and absurd things. Everyone has an excuse today to let out the silly antics are hidden inside them. You can do things that you have wanted to do that make absolutely no sense at all, and it will be okay because you will be celebrating National Absurdity Day.

Do whatever absurd things that pop into your mind. (Please keep safety in mind).

 

November 21 is the ideal day to join in National Stuffing Day as Thanksgiving day is right around the corner, and we are already thinking about the delicious turkey stuffing that is a traditional part of Thanksgiving dinner.

Whether the cook chooses to stuff the bird with crusts of bread, onions, celery, herbs and spices or prefers to prepare a similar dish along side the turkey using the drippings to moisten the dish is personal preference.  The difference is the first is called a stuffing, but the latter is referred to as a dressing.

The usual turkey stuffing consists of bread cubes or crumbs combined with onions, celery, salt, and pepper along with spices and herbs such as summer savory, sage or poultry seasoning.  Other varieties include adding sausage, hamburger, tofu, oysters, egg, rice, apple, raisins or other dried fruits.

The first known documented stuffing recipes appeared in the Roman cookbook, Apicius “De Re Coquinaria”.  Most of the stuffing recipes in this cookbook included vegetables, herbs and spices, nuts and spelt (an old cereal) with some of them also including chopped liver and other organ meat.

In addition to stuffing the body cavity of poultry and fish, various cuts of meat are often stuffed once deboned and having a pouch or slit cut in them.  A few examples of other meats that are frequently stuffed include pork chops, meatloaf, meatballs, chicken breast, lamb chops and beef tenderloin.

Stuffing isn’t limited to the butcher block.  Vegetables are excellent containers for stuffing.  Peppers, tomatoes zucchini and cabbage are just a few of the shapely veggies that make stuffing a fabulous part of your meal.

Give your stuffing some holiday flair with Everything Kitchen’s Sausage, Apple, Cranberry Stuffing

 

November 22

National Tie One on Day might confuse people with its name. However, it is not at all about going out, getting crazy and drinking too much while others are at home, working hard preparing for tomorrow’s big Thanksgiving Day meal.

National Tie One on Day celebrates the apron as well as the past generations of women who wore them and it was also created as a day to bring joy to the life of someone in need and celebrate the spirit of giving.

“Women clad in aprons have traditionally prepared the Thanksgiving meal, and it is within our historical linkage to share our bounty.” EllynAnne Geisel

As part of National Tie One on Day, buy an apron, bake something, tuck a note of encouragement in the pocket of the apron (or pin it on it), wrap the baked good in the apron and give it to someone in need on Thanksgiving Eve.

 

Other than Thanksgiving, November 23 is also National Eat a Cranberry Day.

Found in acidic bogs throughout the cooler regions of the northern hemisphere, cranberries are a group of evergreen dwarf shrubs, or trailing vines, that grow up to 7 feet long and 8 inches high.  Their stems are slender and wiry, and they have small evergreen leaves.

The cranberry flowers are dark pink with very distinct reflexed petals, leaving the style and stamens fully exposed and pointing forward. The fruit of the cranberry plant is a berry that is larger than the leaves and is initially white but when ripe, turns a deep red.

CRANBERRIES:

  • Have an acidic taste that can overwhelm their sweetness.
  • Are a major commercial crop in certain American states;  Massachusetts, New Jersey, Oregon, Washington, and Wisconsin. 
  • Wisconsin is the leading producer of cranberries, with over half of U.S. production.
  • Are mostly processed into products such as juice, sauce, jam or sweetened dried cranberries.
  • Cranberry sauce is considered an indispensable part of a traditional American Thanksgiving meal.
  • Raw cranberries have been marketed as a “superfruit” due to their nutrient content and antioxidant qualities.
  • There are three to four species of cranberry, classified into two sections.
  • White cranberry juice is made from regular cranberries that have been harvested after the fruits are mature, but before they have attained their characteristic dark red color.
  • Cranberry wine is made in some of the cranberry-growing regions of the United States.
  • Laboratory studies indicate that extracts containing cranberry may have anti-aging effects.

The word cranberry comes from “craneberry”;  first named by the early European settlers in America who felt the expanding flower, stem, calyx and petals resembled the neck, head and bill of a crane.

I will be celebrating this day by partaking in way to much cranberry relish and/or sauce.

 

This is such a great day to follow Thanksgiving, especially for children 🙂

Welcomegiving Day is observed annually on the day after Thanksgiving. Conventionally when someone thanks us for a kindness or service, we respond by saying, “You’re Welcome.”  So, it was inevitable that someone would suggest the day after Thanksgiving we should begin to celebrate You’re Welomegiving Day.

Make sure to say You’re Welcome.

Richard Ankli of Ann Arbor, Michigan, creator of the unreasonable holiday Sourest Day and the rhyming May Ray Day, designated You’re Welcomegiving Day in 1977 as a way to create a four-day weekend.

 

Usually served in a specially styled glass, layers of fruit, yogurt or ice cream, and nuts, chocolate or even whipped cream are the ingredients on National Parfait Day on November 25.

A French word that literally means perfect was originally used to describe a kind of frozen dessert beginning in 1894.

In the United States, parfaits are served in the traditional French style by layering parfait cream, ice cream, gelato or pudding in a clear, tall glass topped with whipped cream, fruit or liqueurs. 

The Northern United States expanded on the parfait and began to use yogurt layered with nuts or granola or fresh fruits which may be, but are not limited to, strawberries, blueberries, bananas or peaches. This idea spread quickly across all parts of the country, and the yogurt parfait gained popularity as a breakfast item.

Times have changed over the years, and now parfaits are made up of almost any dessert combination that works well put into layers in a tall, clear glass, ranging from crushed Oreo cookies and cheesecake with whipped cream to angel food cake pieces and lemon cream filling with whipped cream.

Try one of the following parfait recipes:

Chocolate Peanut Butter Parfaits
Fresh Orange Cream Parfaits
Tropical Tapioca Parfaits

 

National Cookie Day is observed annually on November 26.
We can thank the Dutch for more than windmills and tulips.  The English word “cookie” is derived from the Dutch word “koekie” meaning little cake.
There have been cookie-like hard wafers in existence for as long as baking has been documented.  This is because they traveled well however, they were usually not sweet enough to be considered cookies by modern day standards.

The origin of the cookie appears to begin in Persia in the 7th century, soon after the use of sugar became common in the region.  They were then spread to Europe through the Muslim conquest of Spain.  Cookies were common in all levels of society throughout Europe by the 14th century, from the royal cuisine to the street vendors.

Cookies arrived in America in the 17th century.  Macaroons and gingerbread cookies were among the popular early American cookies.

In most English-speaking countries outside of North America, the most common word for cookie is biscuit.  In some regions, both terms, cookies and biscuits are used.

Cookies are classified into different categories, with the most common ones being:

Bar cookies – Drop cookies – Filled cookies
Molded cookies – No bake cookies
Pressed cookies – Refrigerator cookies
Rolled cookies – Sandwich cookies

Pick up some cookies at your local bakery.  Remember to share some of your cookies with your family and friends! Try one of the following cookie recipes:

First Place Coconut Macaroons
Gingerbread Cookies

 

Each year on November 27, people across the country observe National Bavarian Cream Pie Day.

To make a Bavarian Cream Pie, Bavarian cream, also called crème bavaroise, is poured into a baked pie crust and refrigerated.

French chef, Marie Antione Careme is given credit for the invention of Bavarian cream, which is a gelatin-based pastry cream originally served in gourmet restaurants and luxury hotels in France in the early 19th century.

Enjoy this Vanilla Bavarian Cream Pie recipe.

 

We have a day for giving thanks. We have two for getting deals. Now, we have #GivingTuesday, a global day dedicated to giving back. On the Tuesday after Thanksgiving charities, families, businesses, community centers, and students around the world will come together for one common purpose: to celebrate generosity and to give.

Quite simply, take advantage of all the holiday deals to add to your charitable giving. Combined with your family, friends, local and national organizations and through the power of social media, National Day of Giving can become a tradition worth passing on.

In 2012, 92nd Street Y in New York City created National Day of Giving to bring focus to the charitable season in the wake of the commercialized Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

 

Observed annually on November 29th, Electronic Greetings Day reminds us of how things have changed.  The convenience and speed of sending an electronic greeting allows more people than ever to participate in this thoughtful process.  We all enjoy it when someone remembers our birthdays, anniversaries and other important life events. While greeting cards continue to be used, electronic greetings are far more cost-effective and mean equally as much.

Send an electronic Greeting.

Not long after the advent of electronic mail (e-mail) in 1993, the electronic greeting came along.  The first electronic greeting card site was The Electric Postcard and was created by Judith Donath in 1994 at the MIT Media Lab.  Within our research, we were unable to find the creator of Electronic Greetings Day.

 

Did you wake well rested, feeling vigorous and ready for the day? Then you are ready to celebrate Stay Home Because You’re Well Day. This day is celebrated on November 30.

This holiday has no agenda other than to spend a healthful day at home. What you do with it is up to you.

Here are some suggestions if you are having trouble deciding what to do.

  • Catch up on some reading.
  • Take a walk.
  • Get started on your Christmas cards.
  • Follow a toddler around all day.  You do feel well, remember?
  • Take a friend to lunch.
  • Get your 2017 calendar up to date.
  • Try a new recipe and make extra to share with someone who wasn’t feeling well today.
  • Take a nap
  • Plan your next vacation.
  • Make a list of all your single friends and match them up as potential mates.
  • Organize all those photos on your phone.
  • Work on an art project.
  • Clean out your closet and make a donation.

 

This month has been quite fun to go through and find all the great National days to celebrate with your family and friends.

Let me know which one or few are your favorites from this list or which silly celebrations your family participates in every year.

I hope you have a wonderful week and a great Halloween.

Don’t eat to much candy 🙂

 

november national days

Hello, my name is Kristen Osborne I am a happy mother of one beautiful little girl. Very into the internet and trying out new things.

September National Days: New and Interesting Activities

This is my second favorite post I blog about every month. I really enjoy researching the National Days and choosing which ones for each day (there are at least three different for every day) would be good for a fun family activity or lesson.

This month did not disappoint. There are so many fun things to do in September.

 

I am completely in love with the first of September National Days! And here is why….

September 1st is…

National Lazy Mom’s Day!

Moms around the country view this day in different ways.  The majority view the day as a holiday from laundry, dishes, car pools and bathroom cleaning.  Take a break.  Delegate the chores. Place a moratorium on family feuds. That’s how moms celebrate National Lazy Mom’s Day. Well, that’s how I am going to celebrate this year. Or, at least, I’m going to try.

 

National Blueberry Popsicle Day is observed annually on September 2nd.  Whether you decide to purchase a box of blueberry-flavored Popsicles or make your own, it’s sure to be a tasty treat!

Popsicles were invented in 1905 by an 11-year old boy named Frank Epperson.  One day he left a glass of a fruit-flavored drink with a stirring stick on his porch.  When he woke the next morning, unusually frigid temperatures froze beverage solid – hence the beginning of the Popsicle!

 

Each year league bowlers across the United States recognize U.S. Bowling League Day on September 3rd.

Primarily an outdoor sport until around 1840, bowling was called the game of ninepins and popular with gamblers. To snuff out the gambling, the state of Connecticut banned the game in 1841 which led the newly indoor lane owners to add one pin to their alleys to circumvent the law.

Clubs tried organizing and creating set rules, but it wasn’t until 1895 when the American Bowling Congress came together at Beethoven Hall in New York City. The American Bowling Congress established a maximum score of 300 which still stands today. Other rules, such as lane length, widths, and distances between pins were also determined.

Today, leagues of men, women and mixed teams of all ages play in bowling competitions around the world. Weekly league bowling is a great social outing as well as great physical activity.

 

National Wildlife Day is observed annually on September 4th.

National Wildlife Day is an opportunity to learn more about endangered species, preservation and conservation efforts around the world.  Zoos, aviaries, and marine sanctuaries provide a variety of ways to get involved.  From participating in presentations and volunteering to fundraise for rehabilitation services, these facilities have something for everyone to learn.

Colleen Paige, a Pet Lifestyle Expert, and author founded National Wildlife Day in 2005 in memory of wildlife conservationist Steve Irwin.  The day serves to bring global awareness and education concerning the number of endangered animals and the need for conservation and preservation.

 

On September 5th, one of the most popular varieties of pizzas gets its day of honor.  Hold the toppings, please. It’s National Cheese Pizza Day!

  • In ancient Greece, the Greeks covered their bread with oils, herbs, and cheese which some believe is the beginning of the “pizza”.
  • In Byzantine Greek, the word was spelled “πίτα”, pita, meaning pie. 
  • A sheet of dough topped with cheese and honey, then flavored with bay leaves was developed by the Romans.
  • The modern pizza had its beginning in Italy as the Neapolitan flatbread.
  • The original pizza used only mozzarella cheese, mainly the highest quality buffalo mozzarella variant which was produced in the surroundings of Naples.
  • It was estimated that the annual production of pizza cheese in the United States in 1997 was 2 billion pounds.
  • The first United States pizza establishment opened in 1905 was in New York’s Little Italy.
  • Pizza has become one of America’s favorite meals.

Order up or bake up your own cheese pizza to celebrate National Cheeze Pizza Day!

Enjoy these cheese pizza recipes:

Easy Cheese Pizza
Zucchini Goat Cheese Pizza 

 

National Read A Book Day is observed annually on September 6th.  On August 9th, we all celebrated National Book Lovers Day.  While these bookish days may seem similar, National Read a Book Day invites us ALL to grab a book we might enjoy and spend the day reading.

Don’t keep it to yourself.  Share the experience!  Read aloud either to children or to grandparents.  Read to your pets or to your stuffed animals and plants.

Reading improves memory and concentration as well as reduces stress.   Older adults who spend time reading show a slower cognitive decline and tend to participate in more mentally stimulating activities over their lifetime.  Books are an inexpensive entertainment, education and time machine, too!

Sit back, relax and read a book.

National Acorn Squash Day is observed annually on September 7th.  This day celebrates the food holiday of a winter squash that is also known to some as a pepper squash.

Even though it is considered a winter squash, acorn squash belongs to the same species as all summer squashes including zucchini and yellow crookneck squash.

The acorn squash that is dark green, often with a splotch of orange on its side or top, is the most common variety. However, there are newer varieties including the Golden Acorn and the White Acorn.  They can also be variegated in color.

The shape of the squash resembles that of its name, an acorn.  They usually weigh between one to two pounds and are generally between four and seven inches long.  Acorn squash is a hardy squash that keeps for several months when stored in a cool, dry location.

Prepared in different ways for consumption, the acorn squash can be baked, microwaved, sautéed or steamed.  It is often stuffed with rice, meat, cheeses or vegetable mixtures.  The seeds of the squash can be toasted much like pumpkin seeds.

Acorn squash is a good source of dietary fiber and potassium and also has some vitamin C and B, magnesium and manganese.

To celebrate National Acorn Squash Day, enjoy one of these acorn squash recipes:

Roasted Acorn Squash with Wild Rice Stuffing
Sausage and Apple Stuffed Acorn Squash
Basic Roasted Acorn Squash

 

Who doesn’t love the fun & functional ampersand? From jotting a shorthand “and” to branding corporate names, this curly, quirky little character is ubiquitously useful. It’s also quite aesthetic, as you’ll see at AmperArt.com, featuring “the ampersand as fun & fabulous art.”

National Ampersand Day was founded by designer & typographer Chaz DeSimone in 2015. His monthly design project, AmperArt, features “the ampersand as fun & fabulous art.”

To acknowledge & applaud this great little glyph, National Ampersand Day is observed annually on September 8th.

DID YOU KNOW…

The ampersand used to be the last letter of the alphabet?
The ampersand is a ligature of “e” & “t”? That’s “et” in Latin, meaning “and.”
The word “ampersand” is a slurring of “real words” run together over time?
The plus sign is actually an ampersand?

Celebrate National Ampersand Day by having fun with the ampersand:

Use lots & lots of ampersands!
Substitute “&” for “and” in everything you write.
Think of syllable replacements such as &roid, c&elabra, b&.
Send friends whose names contain “and” a special note — &y, &rea, Alex&er, Gr&ma.
Design new styles of ampersands. (Remember, the ampersand represents the letters “et.”)
Visit AmperArt.com.

 

 

National Teddy Bear Day is observed annually on September 9th.  We have all had a special cuddly teddy as a child.  Some of us still have our teddy bear from our childhood.  Whether or not you still have your childhood teddy, today is the perfect day to celebrate your childhood friend!

In 1902, American President Theodore Roosevelt refused to shoot a bear cub while hunting in Mississippi.  This incident made national news. Clifford Berryman published a cartoon of the event in the Washington Post on November 16th, 1902.  The caricature became an instant classic.

The Berryman cartoon of Teddy Roosevelt and the cub inspired New York store owner Morris Michtom to create a new toy.  Morris Michtom wrote President Roosevelt to ask permission to name the new toy a “Teddy Bear”.

 

National Swap Ideas Day, which is observed annually on September 10th, encourages us to share creative or helpful ideas with someone and trade them for their ideas in return.

Swapping ideas today does not have to be done on a one-on-one basis.  It would be fun for a group of people to get together and share ideas.  People could share their thoughts and concepts and also learn from each other, while gathered in a social grouping.

Groups of people benefit from the skills of others, and the energy of brainstorming compounds the efforts of the entire team.  Often an idea shared by one person generates two or even three new concepts within the group creating opportunities for everyone.

Throughout the day, make sure to swap your ideas with others.

 

National Make Your Bed Day is observed annually on September 11th.

Do you want to get a better night’s sleep?  According to the National Sleep Foundation, making your bed can help improve your sleep by reducing the amount of tossing, turning, and restlessness which in return, can be good for your health.

A great night’s sleep can dependon the comfort you feel in your bedroom environment. – National Sleep Foundation

At a Behavioral Sleep Medicine Program, participants learn that the sleep environment is a major component to a restful night’s sleep. In a survey conducted by the National Sleep Foundation, people who make their bed daily more often have a better night’s sleep.  Fresh sheets, dark and cool rooms, and comfortable mattresses and pillows also play a factor in mastering sleep comfort.

Make your bed. If not in the routine of making your bed, use National Make Your Bed Day as an opportunity to start this healthy habit.  Encourage the entire family, especially small children, as creating healthful habits early in life can last a lifetime.

 

The second Tuesday in September (12th) of each year is National Ants On A Log Day.  This day recognizes this iconic and healthy food snack enjoyed by millions of people across the USA and around the world.

Ants on a log is a snack made by spreading peanut butter on celery and placing raisins on top.  The snack name was first used in the 1950s.  The typical peanut butter version of ants on a log is recommended as a healthy snack by the McKinley Health Center at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Early September is a time when kids are headed back to school and more importantly, back to studying. To keep them (and their parents) fueled with brain food is an important tool for staying focused.  The designation is to celebrate and encourage healthy snacking using one of the most iconic treats that both old and new generations enjoy.

 

National Kids Take Over The Kitchen Day is observed on September 13th.

Kids and teens across the country are called to take over their kitchens on this day using their favorite recipes and make a meal for their family!  (Adult supervision and assistance as required for the younger bakers and chefs in the house!)

The objective of this mission of the Young Chefs Academy (YCA) is to empower kids and teens to become more actively involved in the planning, preparation, and cooking of meals.  The YCA is fostering family bonds and actively fighting the battle against the many serious health and social issues related to youth’s eating habits in today’s time.

Try one of these kid-friendly recipes to get your children cooking!

Herbed Chicken Nuggets
Yogurt Sundaes

 

National Live Creative Day is observed annually on September 14.  Let the world see your creativity on National Live Creative Day!

To Live Creative allows for the exploration of imagination.  Celebrate National Live Creative Day by taking the time to invent, discover and dream. Infusing creativity in our lives through a variety a media from painting and graphic art to music and gardening all have an impact on our lives. By expressing our passions and living creative lives, we experience the world.

Stepping into the Live Creative world includes a boundless sense of freedom. Rules tend to fall away when the imagination is unleashed. Authors and artists have long suspended reality in support of their work, to the satisfaction of their imagination. They live creative.

We don’t have to be a master sculptor to Live Creative. Blending a dash of creative into moments of our everyday life can have a powerful effect. Simply being exposed to the arts inspires ideas at home and in the workplace.  Renewing a hobby reduces stress just by being purely enjoyable.  Teaching someone else the craft nurtures personal expression and offers an opportunity to see the world through another’s eyes.

Challenge yourself to start your own Live Creative initiative.

National Live Creative Day was submitted by Creative Promotional Products in April of 2016.  The Registrar at National Day Calendar declared it will be observed annually on September 14.

Creative Promotional Products was founded in 1994 and has started an initiative called Live Creative.  They are a creative company with creative employees, and they want their lives to show that Creativity – they want everyone to show their creativity. Their tagline is Live Creative – This is the year you can change your world!

 

Observed annually on September 15th, National Linguine Day is a favorite of young and old alike.

From the Liguria region of Italy, linguine means “little tongues” in Italian. Made from durum semolina flour, linguine is one of the world’s oldest kinds of pasta. Fettuccine and linguine developed around 400 years ago.  While both are thin, flat noodles, linguine is more narrow and elliptical in shape causing it to be a more delicate pasta.  As a result, linguine is paired with thinner, lighter sauces.

Enjoy these delicious linguine recipes

Linguine with Clam Sauce
Chicken and Onions Over Linguine

On the third Saturday in September (16th), National CleanUp Day encourages all of us to take action to make the entire country a better place to live. Just think, what if everyone just picked up one piece of litter?
From coast to coast, organizations and individuals alike join forces to clean up parks, trails, beaches, mountains, and open spaces.

Outdoor spaces that are free of trash and litter are a more enjoyable experience for everyone. Preservation of our forefathers’ legacy is up to all of us.

Litter, debris, and trash mar the beauty of our natural landscapes. National CleanUp Day puts litter in its place – in the trash and recycle bins. National CleanUp Day provides an opportunity to make those messes right and give the landscape a fresh, clean sweep! Communities, corporations, civic organizations, parks and recreation departments and private citizens will all be uniting together to make National CleanUp Day a success.

By participating on this special day, you will be helping to send a message to your communities that you care about keeping our natural surrounding clean throughout the year. Won’t you join us to make your community beautiful?

Create a team or just bring a friend to remove litter from your favorite outdoor spaces. Spread the word! Join in and be part of the solution. Use #NationalCleanUpDay or #SeaToShiningSea to share on social media.

National CleanUp Day was founded to celebrate the importance of uniting to care for our outdoor spaces and remove litter so our trails, parks, and community spaces remain pleasant and unmarred by waste.

Donations to National CleanUp Day may be tax deductible through our partnership with Clean Trails, a national 501(c)3 non-profit.

Social Media and Contact Us
www.NationalCleanUpDay.org
www.Facebook.com/nationalCleanUpDay
www.instagram.com/nationalCleanUpDay
www.twitter.com/nationalCleanUp

Phone: 720.985.8600
Email: info@nationalcleanupday.org

 

National Apple Dumpling Day is observed annually on September 17th.  These delicious filled pastries are typically made by putting cored and peeled apples on a piece of dough, sprinkling them with cinnamon and sugar, then folding the dough over the apples to form a dumpling.  The dumplings are then oven baked until tender.

Apple dumplings are believed to be native to the northeastern United States, around Pennsylvania.  Often found among the delicious Amish recipes, it is frequently eaten as a breakfast item. However, they are also regularly eaten as a dessert and sometimes served with ice cream.

Perhaps you can enjoy eating some apple dumplings while watching the 1975 Walt Disney movie, The Apple Dumpling Gang. 

Celebrate by enjoying the following recipes for breakfast, snack or dessert!

Mountain Dew Apple Dumpling
Apple Dumpling Cake

America’s favorite sandwich is honored on September 18th with a slice of cheese.  It’s National Cheeseburger day!

There are many theories to the beginning of the cheeseburger dating back to the 1920s.  One story suggests that Lionel Sternberger is reputed to have invented the cheeseburger in 1926 while working at his father’s Pasadena, California sandwich shop, The Rite Spot.  During an experiment, he dropped a slice of American cheese on a sizzling hamburger.

There are other claims of the invention of the cheeseburger:

  • A cheeseburger appeared on a 1928 menu at O’Dell’s, a Los Angeles restaurant, which listed a cheeseburger, smothered with chili, for 25 cents.
  • Kaelin’s Restaurant – Louisville, Kentucky says it invented the cheeseburger in 1934.
  • Denver, Colorado – 1935 – A trademark for the name “cheeseburger” was awarded to Louis Ballast of the Humpty Dumpty Drive-In.
  • According to its archives, Gus Belt, founder of Steak n’ Shake, applied for a trademark on the word “cheeseburger” in the 1930s.

To celebrate National Cheeseburger Day, gather some friends together, and grill up some burgers – with cheese, of course!

or….

Enjoy one of these tasty recipes:

Perfect Bacon Cheeseburgers
Family Friendly Stuffed Cheeseburgers
Mushroom Cheeseburgers
Swiss Cheeseburger with Caramelized Onions on Toast

 

Talk Like A Pirate Day sails away annually on September 19th.

All you bilge rats, Aaaaaaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrrrrgh! As you are out and about on September 19th, don’t be surprised if people are saying, “Ahoy Matie,” “Avast,” “Aye, Aye Capt’n,” “Land Ho!” “Hornpipe,” and many other pirate-like phrases, because it’s International Talk Like a Pirate Day.

Anchor’s away! Get your sea legs and a barrel o’ rum. Feel free to join in anytime with your own version of Pirate-ese. Learn more on how to talk like a pirate here.

International Talk Like a Pirate Day was founded by John Baur and Mark Summers (aka Ol’ Chumbucket and Cap’n Slappy) in 1995.  Click here for the entire story!

 

It’s time for America to stand together in support of our love for String Cheese. Join us as we celebrate National String Cheese Day on September 20th. Whether you call it String Cheese, Snack Cheese or Cheese Sticks…there’s no denying that you call it delicious!

Pack it for a picnic. Have it on a hike. Pass it out for a family snack. And of course, no lunch is complete without this tasty treat. You’ve got to hand it to String Cheese—it’s the fun, easy and protein-packed food that is portable and mess free, Usually made with mozzarella, String Cheese melts easily when heated making it an excellent addition to recipes, too.

Perhaps the most enjoyable part of String Cheese is deciding how to eat it. Most people go for the classic “peel down and chow down” method—separating each stick into thin strands. (After all, it is kind of fun to play with your food!) Others prefer the “get down to business” approach of removing the wrapper and biting into the stick. (Why wait to get that delicious cheese into your belly?) However, you choose to eat it, get your hands on some every September 20th!

What is your favorite way of snacking on string cheese?

Galbani Cheese founded National String Cheese Day in 2017 to celebrate America’s love of String Cheese.

 

Each year on September 21, people across the United States celebrate National Pecan Cookie Day.

This delicious cookie can be eaten and enjoyed the morning, noon and night by hungry snackers everywhere. Another pecan related celebration is National Pecan Day on April 14. Pecan is an Algonquian word, meaning “a nut requiring a stone to crack”. A member of the hickory family, the pecan is native to central and southern United States.

To celebrate National Pecan Cookie Day, try one of the following”tried and true” Pecan Cookie recipes:

Doris’ Pecan Powdered Sugar Drops
Butter Pecan Cookies
Raisin Pecan Oatmeal Cookies

 

National Ice Cream Cone Day is observed annually on September 22nd.

While there is some controversy as to who invented the ice cream cone, one of the earliest mentions of them showed up in French cookbooks around 1825.  Originally referred to as “little waffles”, ice cream cones were waffles rolled into the shape of a cone.

Ice cream cones first became popular in the United States in the late 1800s.  Confectioners turned the first cones by hand. The ice cream cone made its debut at the World’s Fair in St. Louis in 1904.  In 1912, an inventor from Oregon obtained a patent for a machine to make them. He sold his company to Nabisco in 1928, and they still make ice cream cones today.

The ice cream cone continues to be a popular treat for children and adults alike as more flavors of ice cream continue to be made available to please our palates.

Grab an ice cream cone

 

National Great American Pot Pie Day is observed annually on September 23rd.  A baked savory pie typically with both a bottom and a flaky top crust is often served to a hungry bunch.  Be it frozen, from a restaurant or home-made, it is sure to please those taste buds.

The filling of a pot pie varies from many different ingredients, some of which are beef, chicken, turkey, gravy, and seafood.   Many vegetables like potatoes, carrots, green beans, and peas are also popular choices.

To celebrate National Great American Pot Pie Day, enjoy a delicious pot pie.  Use #GreatAmericanPotPieDay to post on social media.

National Great American Pot Pie Day was created in 2002 by the pot pie and frozen food company Marie Callender’s.

 

National Cherries Jubilee Day is observed annually on September 24th.  Smitten with this simply elegant dessert, cherry lovers celebrate National Cherrie Jubilee Day with delight.
Auguste Escoffier receives the credit for the Cherries Jubilee recipe. Knowing the queen’s fondness for cherries, Escoffier prepared the dish for one of Queen Victoria’s Jubilee celebrations. The original recipe didn’t include ice cream.  Instead, the chef poached the cherries in a simple syrup and poured warm brandy over them.  Then just before serving, dramatically set the alcohol aflame.
Later recipes added the liqueur Kirschwasser and ice cream.

Enjoy this Cherries Jubilee recipe.

 

Every year on September 25, comic book readers, collectors, lovers, and fans participate in National Comic Book Day.

First popularized in the United States, comic books are also called comic magazines. Published in the form of sequential, juxtaposed panels that represent individual scenes, comic books often include descriptive prose and written narratives. From the earliest comic strips that later gave birth to comic books, dialogue displayed in bubbles or balloons above characters’ heads. The art form weaves intricate designs using all the elements of text, dialogue, personalities, color and imagery to form storylines that over time have distinguished eras, artists, genres, and themes.

In 1933, a comic book, Famous Funnies, appeared in the United States and is believed to be the first real comic book.  It was a reprinting of earlier newspaper comic strips which established many of the story-telling devices used in comics.

The term “comic book” comes from the first book sold as a book reprinted of humor comic strips.  

Despite their name, comic books are not all humorous in tone and feature stories in all genres.

Comics as a print medium have existed in America since the printing of The Adventures of Obadiah Oldbuck in 1842 in hardcover, making it the first known American comic book.
In 1896, a comic-book magazine was published in the United States featuring The Yellow Kid in a sequence titled “McFadden’s Row of Flats”. The 196-page book, which was a black and white publication, measured 5 x 7 inches and sold for 50 cents.
People who collect comic books are known as pannapictagraphist.

 

The table is set, the batter is mixed, the griddle is hot, and the butter and syrup are ready.  This means you are prepared for National Pancake Day.   This food holiday is observed each year on September 26th.

You may not have time to make a pancake breakfast, but that is okay, pancakes make a great dinner as well. Pancakes can be served at any time and with a variety of toppings or fillings from sweet jams and syrups to savory meats and sauces.

There is archaeological evidence suggesting pancakes are probably the earliest and most widespread breakfast food eaten in prehistoric societies.

Pancakes are also known as flapjacks or hot cakes.

To celebrate National Pancake Day, enjoy one of the following pancake recipes:

Lemon Blueberry Pancakes
Banana and Pecan Pancakes with Maple Butter
Applesauce Pancakes
Buttermilk Pancakes
Pumpkin Pancakes

National Pancake Day’s humble beginnings in 2005, originally started as Lumberjack Day. Marianne Ways and Collen AF Venable sought an excuse to eat pancakes and waffles with friends and as it was one week after “Talk Like a Pirate Day” and that theme had been worn out, eating lots of pancakes like a lumberjack seemed a better holiday than ever.

 

Across the country, folks enjoy a tall, frosty glass on National Chocolate Milk Day which is observed annually on September 27th.

Invented by Hans Sloane in the late 1680s, today chocolate milk can be purchased premixed or it can be made at home with either cocoa powder and a sweetener or with melted chocolate, chocolate syrup or chocolate milk mix.

While Sloane was in Jamaica, he encountered a beverage the locals drank made with cocoa mixed with water. After trying it, he reported the flavor to be nauseating.  After some experimentation, Sloane found a way to mix the cocoa with milk to make it more pleasant tasting. He brought the chocolate recipe back with him upon his return to England.  Now people enjoy this delicious drink every day.

Mix up some chocolate milk to drink

 

National Good Neighbor Day is observed annually on September 28th.  This day was created to acknowledge and celebrate the importance of a good neighbor.

It is a blessing to have a good neighbor, but it is even a greater thing to BE a good neighbor. Good Neighbors often become friends. They watch out for each other, lend a helping hand and are there for advice when asked.  Neighbors offer that cup of sugar when we are short, collect our mail when we are on vacation, watch our homes and sometimes watch our children and our pets. Simply put, being a good neighbor makes good neighbors and develops lifelong friendships.

To celebrate National Good Neighbor Day, do something nice for your neighbor today.

National Good Neighbor Day was created in the early 1970s by Becky Mattson of Lakeside, Montana.  In 1978, United States President Jimmy Carter issued Proclamation 4601:

 “As our Nation struggles to build friendship among the peoples of this world, we are mindful that the noblest human concern is concern for others. Understanding, love and respect build cohesive families and communities. The same bonds cement our Nation and the nations of the world. For most of us, this sense of community is nurtured and expressed in our neighborhoods where we give each other an opportunity to share and feel part of a larger family…I call upon the people of the United States and interested groups and organizations to observe such day with appropriate ceremonies and activities.”

Whether getting one to go or lingering over a second cup, on September 29th be sure to observe National Coffee Day!

Ah, the perfect cup of java.  According to an expert cupper (a professional coffee taster), there are four components of a perfect cup: aroma, body, acidity, and flavor.

From the moment the average coffee lover opens a fresh bag of coffee beans, the aroma beckons, percolating the senses. Even those who don’t drink coffee tend to enjoy the fragrance a roasted bean casts.

When determining the body of a coffee, the bean, the roast, and the brew are all factors. The bean affects the texture of the coffee, whether it’s silky, creamy, thick or thin on the tongue and throat. However, the darker the roast and how it is brewed will alter the feel of a coffee’s body, too. Grandpa’s motor oil blend versus the coffee shop around the corner’s silky smooth, well-practiced grind have entirely different bodies.

The region a coffee is grown determines its acidity. The higher the elevation the coffee grows, the higher the quality and the acidity. These coffees are considered brighter, dryer, even sparkling by cuppers.

When it comes down to it, coffee lovers cherish the flavor as well as the caffeinated boost this roasted bean gives morning or night, black or with cream and sugar. Hot or cold it provides enjoyment even when decaffeinated!

There are many legendary accounts of how coffee first came to be, but the earliest credible evidence of either coffee drinking or the knowledge of the coffee tree appears in the middle of the 15th century in the Sufi monasteries around Mokha in Yemen.  It was here coffee seeds were first roasted and brewed, much like they are prepared today. Yemeni traders brought coffee back to their homeland from Ethiopia and began to cultivate the seed.

In 1670, coffee seeds were smuggled out of the Middle East by Baba Budan, as he strapped seven coffee seeds onto his chest.  The first plants grown from these smuggled seeds were planted in Mysore.  It was then that coffee spread to Italy, to the rest of Europe, to Indonesia and the Americas.

Brazil produces more coffee in the world than any other country followed by Colombia.  More than 50 countries around the world grow coffee, providing a delicious variety for the indulgence of steamy cups of the black drink for connoisseurs to consume.

National Family Health & Fitness Day is observed annually on the last Saturday in September (30th).

National Family Health & Fitness Day USA  promotes family involvement in physical activity in support of one of the goals of the U.S. Surgeon General’s Report on Physical Activity and Health.

Find events and activities at fitnessday.com to join in the celebration and use #FamilyHealthAndFitnessDayUSA to post on social media.

Family Health And Fitness Day USA is organized by the Health Information Resource Center.  The day was started in 1996.

 

 

september national days

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hello, my name is Kristen Osborne I am a happy mother of one beautiful little girl. Very into the internet and trying out new things.

30 Incredibly Fun Fall Activities for the Whole Family

{THERE ARE AFFILIATE LINKS IN THIS POST. IF YOU CHOOSE TO CLICK THEM AND MAKE A PURCHASE I COULD MAKE A COMMISSION AT NO EXTRA COST TO YOU}



Every year around this time we start to get a little antsy. The season is changing, summer is ending, the air is getting a little cooler, and the kids are starting/going back to school.

It’s a lot to take in all at once, so we don’t really think about what to do as much.

I have put together a list of things to do that the entire family can enjoy doing together.

31 Fall Activities for the Whole Family

 

  1. Take a drive in the country
  2. Plant bulbs in the garden for next spring
  3. Go apple picking
  4. Get lost in a corn maze
  5. Go for a hike
  6. Go on a hayride
  7. Collect colorful Fall leaves to use in an art project (ideas)
  8. Make a pine cone bird feeder (directions)
  9. Jump in a pile of leaves
  10. Buy something from a bake sale
  11. Borrow a book from the library
  12. Watch geese fly south for the winter
  13. Learn to knit (tutorial)
  14. Go antiquing for the day
  15. Listen to the sounds of leaves crunching under foot
  16. (Adult) Tour a Winery (Winery List)
  17. Breath in the cool crisp air
  18. Carve your own pumpkins (directions)
  19. Give out candy to trick or treaters in costume
  20. Throw a Halloween Party (see link at the bottom for ideas [affiliate])
  21. Make your kids Halloween costumes or pick a family theme (check bottom of post for my”find costume” link [affiliate])
  22. Get spooked at a haunted house/walk
  23. Eat a slice of warm pumpkin bread (recipe)
  24. Drink hot spiced cider (or cold) (recipe)
  25. Bake an apple or pumpkin pie (Apple recipe) (Pumpkin recipe)
  26. Make butternut squash soup (recipe)
  27. Make and eat a caramel apple (recipe)
  28. Collect pine cones and display them as a decoration Tutorial
  29. Go to a Fall Festival in your town
  30. Go around the table telling each other what you are thankful for

 

When we think of our little ones going off to school it can be a bittersweet feeling. We are so glad they are growing and learning but, we miss them being with us all the time.

To lessen the blow, pick a few, or all of the activities from the list and spend some time together as a family.

Our kids grow up so fast, it’s like we blink and they are 16, talking back and trying to spend as little time as a family as possible.

How do you spend time with your family? Do you have any special activities that you like to do each year?

Let me know in the comments 🙂

 

Find the perfect costume at an unbelievable price. Findcostume.com

 

Hello, my name is Kristen Osborne I am a happy mother of one beautiful little girl. Very into the internet and trying out new things.

August Days

CELEBRATING NATIONAL DAYS WITH THE FAMILY

AUGUST

 

Every day of the year has a new and wonderful way for you to bond with your little family.

Here are the national days for August that you may not know exist.

Marilyn Dalrymple created Respect for Parents Day which is celebrated annually on August 1st. In an effort to “make our families become united and strong by recognizing the leadership roles parents have, and to reinstate the respect for parents that was evident in the past,”Respect for Parents Day” was born.

This day was created as a reminder that parents deserve and require respect and for all to consider the value that parents have in society.

Let your children know all that you do for them/ Not only because you are their parent but because you love them and want them to do well in life.

National Coloring Book Day is celebrated on August 2.

Coloring and coloring books have always been popular with children, but in the past few years, adults have gotten more and more involved with coloring. I know I have many adult coloring books for relaxing and anxiety relief.

Adult coloring is now a huge trend and many are finding that it is not only fun but also a great way to reduce stress.

Founded in 1941, Dover Publications led the way, releasing their first coloring book for adults, Antique Automobiles Coloring Book, in 1970.

Dover now publishes Creative Haven, a popular line of coloring books specially designed for adult colorists.

Find a coloring party near you or participate online.

Spend some time coloring with your friends, children or grandchildren or by yourself.

Enjoy the creativity of making a picture come to life.

National Watermelon Day is enjoyed by many especially on August 3rd, it is a favorite at summertime events such as picnics, barbecues, and fairs.

Watermelon is 92% water, which is why it is so refreshing. It is a vine-like flowering plant originally from southern Africa. Its fruit, which is also called watermelon, is a special kind referred to by botanists as a pepo, a berry which has a thick rind and fleshy center. The watermelon fruit, loosely considered a type of melon – although not in the genus Cucumis – has a smooth exterior rind (usually green with dark green stripes or yellow spots) and a juicy, sweet interior flesh usually deep red to pink, but sometimes orange, yellow, or white.

Watermelons can grow enormous, and you will find competitions across the country which award prizes each year for the largest one.

The Guinness Book of World Records states that the heaviest watermelon weighed 262 pounds.

To learn more refreshing watermelon facts, check out www.watermelon.org.

National Chocolate Chip Cookie Day is observed annually on August 4.

This is a day to enjoy those tasty bits of chocolate in your favorite cookies.

For the same reason we thank Ruth Graves Wakefield for chocolate chips, we also celebrate her name on National Chocolate Chip Cookie Day. For if it weren’t for her curiosity and invention, we wouldn’t hover around ovens savoring the moment the timer dings.

If she had never wondered what chunks of chocolate would taste like mixed into a sugar cookie dough, we would know the ecstasy that is a warm chocolate chip cookie melting on our tongue, our eyes closing in heavenly satisfaction and perfect smiles crowning our faces.  No, if it weren’t for Ruth Graves Wakefield, entire generations would have been denied the bliss that is a chocolate chip cookie.

Grab your discs and call up your friends! The first Saturday in August is National Disc Golf Day!

Requiring less equipment than traditional golf, disc golf shares the common goal of reaching each target with the fewest number of strokes, or to put it more accurately, throws.

Disc golf parallels the traditional game in many ways. Instead of clubs and a ball, the only gear necessary is a disc or frisbee. Starting from a tee pad, which is generally a rectangular area made of anything from rubber to cement or even brick, the player progresses down the fairway after each throw.

From where the disc lands, the player throws again and repeats until the disc lands in the target. As in traditional golf, the total number of throws a player takes to get the disc into the target is equal to the score for that hole.

Disc golf has been played since the late 1960s and became a formalized sport in the 1970s.

In the beginning, targets were nothing more than tree trunks or wooden posts cemented into the ground. As the game progressed, trees and posts were replaced with metal baskets with chains, with the chains helping to catch the discs. Those metal baskets, originally called a “Disc Golf Pole Hole”, are now the modern day targets with dozens of design variations being used with the same general idea and technical specifications in mind.

Disc golf is convenient and inexpensive as well. Adding a couple of discs in the mix when packing for vacation adds very little weight to camping gear or luggage. Unlike traditional golf, a majority of disc golf courses across the country are open to the public, requiring no fees, membership, or tee times.

As a growing international sport, the number of courses is increasing all the time.

In August of 2015, the International Olympic Committee granted full recognition to Flying Disc sports providing a global platform for Flying Disc sports, including disc golf.

People of all ages and abilities play disc golf. A great low-impact, cardiovascular workout that can test both physical skill and mental determination, this activity brings the whole family together for an afternoon of laughs and enjoyment together.

HOW TO OBSERVE

The Professional Disc Golf Association encourages you to get out on the course to celebrate National Disc Golf Day.

With courses in all 50 states, it should be easy to find a disc golf course near you and play a round with your family.

The PDGA Disc Golf Course Directory is a great resource to locate courses in your area.

Each year on August 6, people around the country participate in National Wiggle Your Toes Day.

By going barefoot, wearing sandals or flip-flops, show off your toes. Be sure to give them some fresh air and exercise on National Wiggle Your Toes Day!

Today, let your toes feel the grass, the sand on the beach, the water in the pool or the pebbles along the shore. Encourage the kids to wiggle their little toes to some music!

Observed annually on August 7, National Lighthouse Day honors the beacon of light that for hundreds of years symbolized safety and security for ships and boats at sea.

At one time, the beacon of light could be found across almost all of America’s shorelines.

A lighthouse is described as a tower, building or any other type of structure that is designed to emit light from a system of lamps and lenses and used as an aid to navigation for maritime pilots at sea or on inland waterways.

Lighthouses:

  • Mark dangerous coastlines, hazardous shoals, reefs, safe entries to harbors.
  • Assist in aerial navigation.
  • Have declined due to the expense of maintenance and replacement by modern electronic navigational systems.
  • Has a source of light called a “lamp” (may be electric or oil fueled).
  • Were originally lit by open fire and then candles.
  • Differ depending on the location and purpose but have standard components.
  • Has a lantern room which is a glassed-in housing at the top of a lighthouse tower.
  • Has a Watch Room or Service Room beneath the lantern room.
  • Has an open gallery outside the Watch Room or Lantern Room.
  • Development accelerated in the 17th century with Britain’s Trinity House constructing its first in 1609.
  • Earliest in North America was in St. Augustine, Florida.  Printed on a 1791 map, it had been built by Menendez after his landing in 1586.
  • America’s next lighthouse was Boston Light on Little Brewster Island in 1716.
  • The oldest existing lighthouse in the United States is the Sandy Hook Lighthouse in New Jersey. Built in 1764, this lighthouse is still in operation.
  • At the end of the 19th century, the United States had the most lighthouses of any nation.
  • The 9th Act of the first Congress created the US Bureau of Lighthouses in 1789, which placed lighthouses under federal control.
  • The United States Coast Guard took over on July 7, 1939.
  • Visiting and photographing lighthouses has become a popular hobby as well as collecting ceramic replicas.

Take a nice road trip with your family to visit a historical lighthouse. (If you are in the area I highly recommend the Cape May Lighthouse).

National Happiness Happens Day is observed each year on August 8.

So on this day… just let it happen. You know. Happiness.

Happiness is encouraged all day. Recognize every moment of glee, joy, delight, and pleasure. Don’t let it pass.

A flicker of a giggle should be given its due and should it blossom into full blown happiness, don’t be surprised. It happens!

The Secret Society of Happy People is an organization that was founded in August of 1998 and formed to celebrate the expression of happiness.

The society encourages members to recognize their happy moments and think about happiness in their daily life. They have two motto’s which include “Happiness Happens” and “Don’t Even Think of Raining on My Parade.” Their purpose is to stimulate people’s right to express their happiness.

Founded in 1999 by the Secret Society of Happy People as “Admit You’re Happy Day”, Happiness Happens Day was created to recognize and express happiness. August 8 was chosen as it is the anniversary of the first membership in 1998.

Observed each year on August 9, avid readers get to celebrate on National Book Lovers Day!

A day for all those who love to read, National Book Lovers Day encourages you to find your favorite reading place, a good book (whether it be fiction or non-fiction) and read the day away.

Bibliophile – a person who has a great appreciation for or collects books.

Some History about books:

  • The very first books used parchment or vellum (calf skin) for the book pages.
  • The book covers were made of wood and often covered with leather.
  • The books were fitted with clasps or straps.
  • Public libraries appeared in the Middle Ages.
  • Books in public libraries were often chained to a bookshelf or a desk to prevent theft.

Moving forward:

Book manufacturing’s recent development included digital printing.

Book pages are printed using toner rather than ink. Digital printing opens up the possibility of print-on-demand, where no books are printed until after an order is received from a customer.

E-books are rapidly increasing in popularity. E-book (electronic book) refers to a book-length publication in digital form. They are usually available through the internet. However, can also be found on CD-ROM and other forms. E-books are read either by computer or via a portable book display device known as an e-book reader, such as a Reader, Nook or Kindle.

Grab some books with the kids and enjoy a nice time reading together. Let the books take you to far off places in your minds.

It is National Lazy Day, so we choose to be lazy rather than tell you that this holiday is observed each year on August 10th.

Just sit back, relax with a glass of lemonade and enjoy being with your family on this lazy day.

Each year on August 11, parents across the United States participate in National Son’s and Daughter’s Day.

On this day, spend time with the joys of your life.

Let your children know that you are glad they are part of your life.

Share family stories, listen to the events of their day, their hopes, and dreams.

Enjoy every day you have with them and spend as much quality time as you can.

Do something special for your children today.

If they are at home, go for a walk or enjoy a local park.

If your children are grown, give them a call and remind them how special they are to you.

Saturdays and Summertime are the perfect combinations for garage sales.

That is why the second Saturday in August is designated National Garage Sale Day.

On this day, you will see people finding great deals at these neighborhood sales.

For those having the sales, this is a way for them to find new homes for items they no longer need.

If you see a driveway full of items and a sale sign out, stop by and celebrate National Garage Sale Day.

Daniel Rhodes of Alabama came up with the idea of having a National Garage Sale Day in 2001 after seeing neighbors having sales on different weekends.

Rhodes thought it would be more convenient if they all had them on the same weekend.

Left-Hander’s Day is observed annually on August 13th.

In a right-handed dominated world, August 13th is the day that left-handed individuals can claim as their own.

Approximately 10% of the population is a Southpaw. Scientists haven’t discovered why a person is left-handed, but it more probable that you will have a left-handed child if one of the parents is left-handed.

Make a game with the kids, If you’re all right-handed, try doing everything with your left hand and see who can complete certain tasks.

National Creamsicle Day is observed annually on August 14.

This is a day to enjoy this refreshing summertime orange and vanilla treat.

Creamsicle” is a brand name of an ice cream treat consisting of vanilla ice cream on a Popsicle stick coated with an exterior of flavored ice with the original flavor being orange.

Enjoyed the whole year round, the Creamsicle now comes in many flavors.

Here are a few Creamsicle recipes for you to make and enjoy with the kids!

Three Ingredient Low-Fat Creamsicle Cake
Orange Creamsicle Cupcakes

National Relaxation Day is observed annually on August 15th.

It is time to slow down, unwind and relax!

National Relaxation Day is an important day as we all need a break from the fast-paced and often hectic lifestyles we live.

Taking time to recuperate and rejuvenate our tired minds and bodies may help prevent many health risks. Like the founder of this day suggested, too much work can make us sick, run down, and tired which can lead to more stress.

It has been proven that stress can be harmful to our health, both mentally and physically.

Most doctors will agree that finding ways to relax and reduce stress will improve overall health.

What is your favorite relaxation activity?

Here are some relaxing activities:

  • Reading a book
  • Fishing
  • A picnic in the park
  • Walking along the beach
  • Taking a drive in the country
  • Spa
  • Golfing
  • Photography
  • A movie
  • Window shopping
  • Calm
  • Lunch with the family
  • Watching sports
  • Swimming

These are just a few of the many possible relaxation ideas that you may want to use to celebrate this holiday.

We are aware that not everyone is able to get this holiday off from work, so while you are at your job, do what you can to avoid stress and try not to work late today.

When you get off of work, take a deep breath, unwind, relax and begin your National Relaxation Day celebration!

What would be better than a day filled with laughter?

National Tell a Joke Day is observed annually on August 16th, and that’s no joke!

This day should be filled with smiles and much laughter from morning till night as everyone shares their favorite jokes. The more jokes you tell, the more fun you will have and so will those around you.

Jokes have been a part of human culture since at least 1900 BC.

A joke is described as something that is spoken, written or done with humorous intention. They can come in many forms.

On National Tell a Joke Day, try a one-liner or a knock-knock joke if you aren’t comfortable with the whole comedic act that can be involved in the short story versions.

Some simply rely on gestures to express humor. With humor, timing and delivery can be an essential element. Without it, the joke will fall flat.

Be sure to know the audience. Clown jokes may not go over well at a phobia convention.

In moderation, laughter is healthy, uses the abdominal muscles and releases endorphins (natural feel good” chemicals) into the brain.

Tell a joke, listen to a joke, get a joke book and get the kids to take turns reading a few… laugh, celebrate, have fun and enjoy!

National I LOVE My Feet Day! is observed annually on August 17.

This is a day to appreciate how valuable our feet are, to practice good foot care and pamper our feet.

Our feet are our primary mode of transportation. They quietly and faithfully help us stand, swim, run, walk, play sports, jog, skip and dance.

They take us to school and work. Our feet withstand all the things we do in our everyday lives and accomplish things our hands cannot.

Taking care of our feet is important for preventing long-term problems. Years of wear and tear can be hard on them, as can disease, bad circulation, improperly trimmed toenails and poorly fitting shoes.

Practicing good foot care is easy. Elevating your feet when you sit is a relaxing way to help reduce swelling. Stretching, walking or having a gentle foot massage aids circulation.

A warm foot bath is also helpful. Make sure your feet are dry before putting on shoes. Wearing shoes when outside provides your feet better protection.

75% of the adult population has a foot problem and improper shoe choices account for the majority of those problems. Wearing properly fitted shoes with good arch support, getting foot massages and regular pedicures can reduce foot problems. If you have persistent foot pain, consulting a podiatrist can help.

A good way to celebrate today would be going out and buying your children’s new school shoes. Let them pick out their favorite, most comfortable pair for the coming school year.

On August 18, we recognize a dish sizzling with savory Tex-Mex flavor.

It’s National Fajita Day!

Originally made from throwaway cuts of beef by Mexican cowboys/cattle drivers in Southwest Texas, the fajita was developed as a regional staple in the early 1930s.

These cowboys cooked the steak over an open fire or grill and served it with flour or corn tortillas. Fresh Pico de gallo (also called salsa fresca, made from chopped tomato, onion, cilantro, fresh serranos, salt, and lime juice), guacamole and southwestern spices elevated the fajita, introducing it to new audiences as it later became a destination food in the culinary world.

As their popularity grew, fajitas added colorful flair to Tex-Mex menus with sizzling platters full of bright peppers, onions, tender steak, shrimp, chicken or pork with freshly made tortillas.

By the 1980s, most Mexican restaurants in the United States served fajitas. In the modern culinary kitchen, lime, cilantro and many vegetables find their way into a fajita along with the perfect seasonings.

Grilling with mesquite adds a smoky flavor and bacon adds crunch. Of course, who could forget the cheese?

With their festive presentations, they continue to be enjoyed today. The fajita has come a long way from skirt steak trimmings!

This year National Fajita Day falls on a Friday so take the family out to your favorite Mexican restaurant for fajitas and start the weekend off right!

National Soft Ice Cream Day is observed annually on August 19th.

Soft service ice cream is the result of air being introduced to the dairy product during the freezing process.

In 1934 on Memorial Day weekend, Tom Carvel had a flat tire on his ice cream truck in Hartsdale, New York. After pulling into a parking lot, he began selling the softened ice cream to vacationers driving by.

With amazement, seeing the love that people had for soft ice cream, he concluded that a fixed location selling the new-found dessert was potentially a good business idea.

In 1936, Carvel opened his first store on the original broken down truck site, selling his secret formula soft serve ice cream dispensed from his patented super low-temperature ice cream machines.

If an ice cream truck frequents your street make sure to get some for yourself and the kids. If not, take a ride after dinner to an ice cream shoppe to get some soft serve goodness.

Each year on August 20th, National Radio Day recognizes the great invention of the radio.

In the late 19th century, it became clear that wireless communication was possible.

There were several inventors who had a part in the invention of the radio in the late 1800s and not just one person can be credited with its beginning. To make the radio a reality, it required a number of different inventions and discoveries including both transmission and reception methods as well as technology.

It was in the 1920s when the first broadcast stations began airing programs.

These first programs were those of news and world events.

  • Radio ownership grew from two out of five homes in 1931 to four out of five homes in 1938.
  • According to FCC statistics, at the end of 2012, there were more than 15,000 licensed broadcast radio stations in the U.S.

To celebrate National Radio Day, listen to your favorite radio stations and let the kids dance around and sing along.

Each year on August 21, there are various events and activities held across the United States in recognition of National Senior Citizens Day.

This day was created as a day to support, honor and show appreciation to our seniors and to recognize their achievements.

Their valuable contributions to our communities create better places to live.

For all they have achieved throughout life and for all they continue to accomplish, we owe older citizens our thanks and a heartfelt salute. We can best demonstrate our gratitude and esteem by making sure that our communities are good places in which to mature and grow older — places in which older people can participate to the fullest and can find the encouragement, acceptance, assistance, and services they need to continue to lead lives of independence and dignity”

~ President Ronald Reagan – August 19, 1988 Proclamation 5847

To celebrate National Senior Citizens Day, spend time with the senior citizens you know. Let them know that they are appreciated and loved.

It may also be a good day for you and your children to volunteer at a retirement home and share your smile with those who may not otherwise get a visitor today. Teach them that being nice to others is not just for those people but to help us be happy knowing we are the reason those people are smiling and having a good time.

National Tooth Fairy Day observed on August 22.

This childhood favorite evolved with a group of healthcare fairies during the mid-1920s.

From bath fairies to Fairy Wand Tooth Whitener, kids were encouraged through a wave of advertisements and health classes to eat their veggies, brush their teeth and get fresh air.

Esther Watkins Arnold brought the tooth fairy to life in an eight-page play-let in 1927 called The Tooth Fairy.

At the same time, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle made his claim that fairies and gnomes were real by publishing pictures of two girls surrounded by “verified” fairies.

Schools began performing Arnold’s play the following year, and children, primed with vivid imaginations, placed their freshly lost teeth under their pillows at night in the hopes of a visit from the tooth fairy.

Enjoy the last days of summer and the warm summer breezes on August 23 as you celebrate the annual National Ride the Wind Day.

National Ride The Wind Day commemorates the anniversary of the first human-powered flight to win the Kremer prize.

It was on August 23rd of 1977 that the Gossamer Condor 2, flew the first figure-eight course specified by the Royal Aeronautical Society, at Minter Field in Shafter, California. Slowly cruising at only 11 mph, it traveled a distance of 2,172 meters.

  • The Gossamer Condor 2 was built by Dr. Paul B MacCready and piloted by amateur cyclist and hang-glider pilot Bryan Allen.

  • The Gossamer Condor 2 aircraft is preserved at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum.

We all know that cooler air is right around the corner so take advantage of these nice days and get outside as much as possible. Test out those human-powered aircraft and make some history. summer breezes allow us to fly human-powered. In the event you lack a human-powered aircraft, flying a kite is always a good back plan.

The first United States patent for a waffle iron was issued to Cornelius Swarthout of Troy, New York on August 24, 1869.

In honor of this anniversary, National Waffle Day is observed each year on August 24th.

Eaten throughout the world, a waffle is a leavened batter or dough that is cooked between two plates that are patterned to give a characteristic size, shape and surface impression.

Waffles come in many forms. Depending on the type of batter or iron used, the resulting waffle vary by consistency, size, shape and flavor.

Waffle irons and waffles originated around the 14th century.

An anonymous husband penned the first known waffle recipe as a set of instructions for his wife.

According to the manuscript, Le Ménagier de Paris, each of the four recipes began:

  • Beat some eggs in a bowl, season with salt and add wine.

  • Toss in some flour, and mix.

  • Then fill, little by little, two irons at a time with as much of the paste as a slice of cheese is large.

  • Then close the iron and cook both sides.

  • If the dough does not detach easily from the iron, coat it first with a piece of cloth that has been soaked in oil or grease.

  • 1911 – First electric waffle iron introduced by General Electric.
  • 1953– Frank Dorsa’s Eggo Frozen Waffles are sold in Supermarkets for the first time.
  • 1964 – Belgian Waffles debut at New York’s World’s Fair.

Following are a few waffle recipes for you to make and share with your family and friends!

True Belgian Waffles
Classic Buttermilk Waffles
Apple Cinnamon Waffles
Banana Oatmeal Buttermilk Waffles
Best Chocolate Chip Waffles

National Banana Split Day is observed annually on August 25th!

Traditionally served in a long dish, called a boat, a banana is cut in half lengthwise and laid in the dish with scoops of vanilla, chocolate and strawberry ice cream placed in between.

The strawberry ice cream is complimented with pineapple topping.

Chocolate syrup is poured on the vanilla ice cream and strawberry topping covers the chocolate ice cream.

Crushed nuts, whipped cream and maraschino cherries garnish the entire boat.

Today, there are many variations to the classic banana split.

A 23-year-old apprentice pharmacist at Tassel’s Pharmacy in Latrobe, Pennsylvania created the first banana split in 1904.

David Evans Strickler enjoyed inventing sundaes at the store’s soda fountain. His first “banana-based triple ice cream sundae” sold for 10 cents, double the cost of all the other sundaes.

In Strickler’s hometown of Latrobe, Pennsylvania, they proudly celebrate his creation with a festival annually in August.

In 2013, an official marker was placed at the site of the pharmacy where Strickler first made his famous banana split.

The United States Post Office honored the banana split and the town of Latrobe in 2016 with a 47-cent “forever stamp depicting the banana split.

It was one of five stamps in the “Soda Fountain Favorites” series.

For a time, Latrobe residents could receive a cancellation mark memorializing their claim to fame.

Each summer on the 26th of August, Popsicle lovers across the United States enjoy National Cherry Popsicle Day.

One evening in 1905, 11-year-old Frank Epperson mixed a batch of soda on his porch and left it with the stirring stick still in it for the night. It hit record low temps that night and he awoke to find….

To learn more and to get some tasty Popsicle recipes see my post “Popsicles… Where did they come from?”

Each year on August 27th it is National Just Because Day.

Feel free to celebrate this day any way you choose. Just because!

Every day we all do things that are expected or required of us or because we have to.

Well, on National Just Because Day, that does not apply.

This day is a chance to do something without rhyme or reason.

It could be that there is an outfit at the mall that you are admiring; buy it…just because.


Maybe you want to use a vacation day just to go fishing; do it…just because.


Perhaps you would like to pay the tab for the table next to you at your favorite restaurant; do it…just because.


Possibly you want to sing really loud while you’re in your car, by yourself, with your windows rolled down; do it…just because.


Surprise someone with flowers…just because!


Make something up…just because!


Or maybe, just maybe, do something just because Mom said so.

 

National Cherry Turnovers Day is observed annually on August 28th.

Cherry turnovers are a sweet pastry made by placing a cherry filling on a piece of dough, folding the dough over, sealing it then either baking it or frying it.

FUN CHERRY FACTS:

  • Related to plums, peaches, and nectarines, cherries are drupes or stone fruits.
  • Cherries were brought to North America in the 1600s by the English colonists.
  • There are more than 1,000 varieties of cherries in the United States.
  • There are an average of 44 cherries in one pound.

More National Cherry Holidays:

  • January 3rd is National Chocolate Covered Cherry Day.
  • April 23rd is National Cherry Cheesecake Day.
  • May 17th is National Cherry Cobbler Day.
  • September 24th is National Cherries Jubilee Day.

Try these recipes with your kids today!

Tasty Cherry Turnovers

Easy Cherry Turnovers

 

National Chop Suey Day is recognized each year on August 29.

Chop suey, which means “assorted pieces,” is a dish in American Chinese cuisine consisting of meat (chicken, fish, beef, prawns or pork) and eggs that are cooked quickly with vegetables (usually bean sprouts, cabbage, and celery) and bound in a starch-thickened sauce. Rice typically accompanies this delicious dish.

It is believed, by some, that chop suey was invented in America by Chinese Americans.

However, anthropologist E.N. Anderson concludes that it is based on tsap seui (miscellaneous leftovers) which is common in Taishan, a district of Guangdong Province.

Taishan is the home of many early Chinese immigrants to the United States.

Another account claims that chop suey was invented by Chinese American cooks that were working on the transcontinental railroad in the 19th century.

A tale is told of chop suey’s creation stemming from the Qing Dynasty Premier Li Hongzhang’s visit to the United States in 1896. According to the story, his chef wanted to create a meal that was suitable for both the Chinese and the American palates.

It has also been told that Li wandered to a local Chinese restaurant after the hotel kitchen closed, where the chef, embarrassed that he had nothing ready to offer, came up with the new “chop suey” dish using scraps of leftovers.

Another myth tells of an 1860s Chinese restaurant cook in San Francisco that was forced to serve something to the drunken miners after hours. To avoid a beating, having nothing fresh to offer, he threw leftovers in a wok and provided a makeshift meal to the miners. The miners loved the dish, asked him what it was called to which he replied, “Chopped Sui.”

Traveling to the United States in 1903, Liang Oichao, a Guangdong native, wrote that there existed a food item called chop suey which was popularly served by Chinese restaurateurs, but which local Chinese people did not eat.

Whatever is the true origin the fact is that it is very tasty. Take your family out for a nice Chinese dinner to celebrate Chop Suey Day.

On August 30 be sure to stock up on one of America’s favorite fire roasted treats. It’s National Toasted Marshmallow Day!

Get your friends together, gather up some firewood, a few long sticks and a bag of marshmallow and you have the makings of a great night ahead of you.

Toasted marshmallows are a special part of summer evenings around a bonfire.

One of the popular ways to enjoy a delicious warm, gooey toasted marshmallow is with chocolate and graham crackers in a S’more.

Upon personal preference, marshmallows are heated to various degrees from gently toasted to a charred outer layer.

The charred outer layer is achieved by igniting the marshmallow.

Marshmallows now come in a variety of flavors as well as sizes for maximum toasting opportunities.

National Toasted Marshmallow Day is sponsored by the National Confectioners Association.

Get the kids together and char some marshmallows together.

Observed annually on August 31, National Trail Mix Day honors the mix that was developed as a healthy snack to be taken along on hikes.

Trail mix is an ideal hike snack food because it is very lightweight, easy to store, nutritious and provides a quick energy boost from the carbohydrates in the dried fruits or granola as well as sustained energy from the fats in the nuts.

One claim to the invention is held by two California surfers, who in 1968 blended peanuts and raisins together for an energy snack.

However, in the 1958 novel The Dharma Bums written by Jack Kerouac, trail mix is mentioned when the two main characters describe the planned meals in preparation for their hiking trip.

Plan a short hiking trip with your family and pack a few bags of tasty trail mix to snack on along the way.

You can make your own trail mix using your favorite ingredients.

Many varieties of trail mix are available at your favorite grocery or convenience store.

 

I hope you have enjoyed the August Edition of Celebrating National Days with the Family.

If you found any fun things to do with your family from this list please let me know in the comments.

I hope everyone has a happy safe end of the summer. 🙂

Stay Cool.

Hello, my name is Kristen Osborne I am a happy mother of one beautiful little girl. Very into the internet and trying out new things.

63 Family Activities to beat the heat this Summer

We all know, the summer heat is not going away anytime soon. So, your kids may be spending a lot of their time inside the house.

Here are some DIY craft/activities to keep the kids busy.

12 DIY Crafts

-Wooden Peg Dolls are all the rage but it can get expensive to buy individual dolls, especially if you have more than one child. They are very easy to make and the materials are inexpensive. Check out this tutorial to make your own wooden peg dolls.

-Felt boards! A twist on paper dolls… Felt Monsters you don’t have to make them into monsters you can make princesses or knights and dragons. Your children’s imagination has no limits 🙂

-Homemade musical instruments… kids love making noise, what better way to teach them that with musical instruments? Tin Can Drums

-Choose your child’s favorite colors and make these cards. Craft Foam Sewing Cards

-These ABC Game Pieces are a fun learning tool for tracing or letter learning.

-Are you a mom of an infant? This is a great learning tool. Infant Sensory Boards Bright colors, a variety of textures, and fabric colors.

-Two words…. Homemade Playdough

-A Marble Run is a great way to prevent boredom. Hours of fun and laughter with this great activity.

-Make learning fun with this Sight Words Treasure Hunt. Somewhat like a scavenger hunt, but they are looking for letters to spell out the words.

-Always a winner with young children is Homemade Finger Paints.

-The Hot Air Balloon Craft is a really fun activity for kids and parents to enjoy.

-Tic-Tac-Toe is a fun game for everyone. Make this DIY game set out of durable fabric so you and your children can enjoy it time and again.

51 Activities for Hot Days

  1. Run through the sprinklers
  2. Visit a water park
  3. Take a picnic to the beach, Pack lots of cold, refreshing drinks.
  4. Visit an ice cream parlor
  5. Fill water toys with ice cold water and chase the family outside
  6. Go to the bookstore and browse all the great new releases
  7. Go to the movies
  8. Read a book together
  9. Make your own ice pops
  10. Rent a DVD or stream a Netflix movie for the whole family
  11. Let the kids have fun washing the car (with your supervision)
  12. Go to a Baseball game
  13. Help the kids set up a lemonade stand
  14. Go to a bowling alley
  15. Visit a local aquarium
  16. BOARD GAMES
  17. Box fans are great for robot voices
  18. Go to the library and show your kids your favorite old books
  19. Get the kids together and do a random act of kindness
  20. Get out the coloring books and color in silly ways
  21. Play a game of hide and seek
  22. Build a fort with pillows and blankets
  23. Do some baking
  24.  Get the kids interested in dusting by making it a game
  25. Dance (make up silly moves and have a contest)
  26. Learn a new song
  27. Have an indoor picnic
  28. Legos
  29. Have a tea party
  30. Make roads on the floor with painters tape and race toy cars
  31. Play kitchen and pretend to cook for each other
  32. Dress up       
  33. Put together a large puzzle (put it in a place where it can stay out for a while and work on it a bit every day)
  34. Create your own song with your kid’s toy instruments and encourage them to use their imaginations
  35. Sticker Collage (have the kids put stickers on paper n any way they want
  36. Take a nap (Hot air can make you very tired.  Drink a glass of water and then take a nap with the kids)
  37. Have a painting party with watercolors
  38. Play a card game
  39. Guess what? (put an object in a paper bag, and have your children close their eyes and they feel it and try to guess what it is)
  40. Grocery Store (let kids “shop” around the house and chek out with fake money)
  41. Go see some local indoor attractions
  42. Set up a small tent in the house and pretend to go camping
  43. Put on a puppet show
  44. Play with a train set
  45. Make a craft basket (anything that can be used to craft goes in the basket. whenever they are bored they can get the basket and make something
  46. Take silly pictures       
  47. Make shadow puppets on the wall
  48. Balloon toss (make sure the balloon doesn’t touch the ground
  49. Gather some medium sized rocks. Wash them and paint them into “pet rocks”
  50. Scavenger Hunt
  51. Push each of the kids around in the laundry basket (extra points for getting them to help with folding and putting away before the fun ride in the basket).

 

 

Extremely hot days can be boring for the kids. Hopefully, this list gave you some ideas for fun family activities to fight the boredom and the heat.

 

Is there anything not on this list that you like to do on those hot summer days?

Let me know in the comments and please share if you enjoyed this post.

 

family activities for the hot days of summer

 

 

 

 

Hello, my name is Kristen Osborne I am a happy mother of one beautiful little girl. Very into the internet and trying out new things.

Days of the Month to Celebrate with Family: July

Days of the Month to Celebrate with Family: July

This has got to be my favorite month of the year. Not only because it contains my birthday AND Independence Day (which happens to be the same day).

I love July because there is so much life and fun outside.

The birds are singing. The squirrels and wild rabbits are out in droves. The dogs are running around with their families. The kids are outside actually enjoying the sunshine!

This is, in my opinion, the most wonderful time of the year.

Let’s see if we can have a little fun in the coming days of July.

 

July 1

National Postal Worker Day is observed annually on July 1st.  This is a day to appreciate and thank the numerous men and women who work consistently and diligently to deliver all of our mail and packages.  These employees suffer some of the harshest working conditions, yet continue to persevere six days a week.

Across the United States, postal workers walk an average of 4 to 8 miles carrying a full load of letters and packages and delivering them promptly to each of our doorsteps. They work in all kinds of weather including extreme heat and cold, rain and sleet and blizzards, too.

 

Besides severe weather, they have also dealt with unusual packages.  In 1913 the postal service started delivering packages up to a maximum 11 pounds.  The most surprising package to arrive for delivery was a small child.  Barely under the weight limit, James Beagle was mailed at a cost of 15 cents to his grandmother just a few miles away.  This practice continued for just over a year until the postmaster general was able to put regulations in place prohibiting it. 

Take time to thank your local postal worker. Encourage the kids to get the word out and make every postal worker’s day.  

National Postal Worker Day was established in 1997 by a Seattle-area carrier who wanted to honor fellow employees.

 

July 2

World UFO Day is an awareness day for people to gather together and watch the skies for unidentified flying objects. The day is celebrated by some on June 24, and others on July 2. June 24 is the date that aviator Kenneth Arnold reported what is generally considered to be the first widely reported unidentified flying object sighting in the United States, while July 2 commemorates the supposed UFO crash in the 1947 Roswell UFO Incident.

The stated goal of the July 2 celebration is to raise awareness of “the undoubted existence of UFOs” and to encourage governments to declassify their files on UFO sightings.

People are known for looking at the sky together during this day and doing other UFO themed activities. For instance watching UFO movies together even meditate in groups on the subject. The most important thing is that people collectively open their minds to the subject for one day. 

The World UFO Day Organization aka WUFODO organizes get-togethers in many countries. If you’d like to know if they organize something near you be sure to check out the World UFO Day Event map.

 

July 3

National Eat Your Beans Day is a “live healthy” holiday observed every year on July 3.  

This day celebrates the bean vegetable in all sizes, shapes, and colors.  Beans or legumes are one of the longest-cultivated plants dating back to the early seventh millennium BCE.

Now, just as throughout the Old and New World history, beans are a major source of protein.  A very healthy choice for any meal or snack, they are also an excellent source of fiber,  low in fat and high in complex carbohydrates, folate, and iron.

  • There are approximately 40,000 bean varieties in the world.
  • Only a fraction of these varieties are mass-produced for regular consumption.

To celebrate, enjoy a fava bean dip with goat cheese and garlic dip or black bean chili recipe.

Other than Independence Day and MY BIRTHDAY 🙂  

July 4 is also National Barbecued Spareribs Day.

One of the most popular days to barbecue and grill, July 4th will have the back yards, patios and beaches heating up and smoking with the flavors of spareribs.  These inexpensive cuts of pork or beef ribs can be seasoned with spice rubs or with sauces and slow cooked over low heat on the grill or in the oven.

Give this sparerib recipe or dry rub recipe a try and enjoy the Independence Day weekend! 

 

July 5

National Apple Turnover Day is observed on July 5.  To celebrate, enjoy this delicious American treat which was first served in the 19th century.

Also called hand pies because they are so portable, apple turnovers are a pastry made by placing apple filling on a piece of dough, folding the dough over, sealing it, then baking them. Although most turnovers are baked, they can also be fried. 

To celebrate National Apple Turnover Day, try this Apple Turnover recipe and share them with your family and friends. 

 

July 6

In the United States, National Fried Chicken Day is observed each year on July 6th.  On this day, fried chicken lovers across the country celebrate this American favorite at a nearby restaurant, home or an outdoor picnic.

After its introduction to the American South, fried chicken soon became a staple. Over time, seasonings and spices were added to enrich the flavor of the chicken.

Fried chicken is a dish that consists of chicken pieces which have been floured or battered then pan-fried, deep-fried or pressure-fried. The breading adds a crisp coating to the exterior of the chicken.

Traditionally the chicken is fried in lard.  However, corn oil, peanut oil, canola oil or vegetable oil are also frequently used.

To celebrate, try this fried chicken recipe!

Invite some friends over, make some fried chicken and get the kids involved in breading the chicken.

July 7

On July 7th, it is time to indulge on National Strawberry Sundae Day.  Each year on this day, Americans combine vanilla or strawberry ice cream, strawberry sauce, fresh strawberries and whipped cream.

Make several strawberry sundaes, and enjoy this delicious treat with friends and family.

Set up a strawberry sundae bar and invite the neighbors to make their own.

 

July 8

National Chocolate with Almonds Day is observed annually on July 8th. What a great combination to enjoy. It is also filled with added health benefits!

When it comes to adding almonds to chocolate, the options are plentiful. From cakes to chocolate bars, puddings to cookies we can celebrate National Chocolate with Almonds Day with snacks and desserts galore!

HEALTH BENEFITS OF ALMONDS:

  • reduce the risk of heart attack
  • lower ‘bad’ cholesterol
  • protects artery walls from damage
  • help build healthy bones and teeth
  • provide healthy fats and aid in weight loss
  • lower the rise in blood sugar and insulin after meals
  • help provide good brain function
  • nourish the nervous system
  • alkalize the body

To celebrate here is a Chocolate Almond Cake recipe for you to enjoy with your family.

 

July 9

Observed each year on July 9, National Sugar Cookie Day honors the ever popular and delicious sugar cookie.

A holiday favorite and very easy to make, sugar cookies are sure to disappear quickly once they come out of the oven.  Made with sugar, flour, butter, eggs, vanilla and either baking powder or baking soda, most people have the ingredients on hand at all times and can have the kids help make a batch on any day.  The fun just begins with cutting the dough with fun shaped cookie cutters and then getting creative by decorating with icing and sprinkles. 

The sugar cookie is believed to have originated in the mid 1700′s in Nazareth Pennsylvania.  It was there that the German Protestant settlers created the round, crumbly and buttery cookie that came to be known as the Nazareth Cookie.

To celebrate here is a sugar cookie recipe for you to make with your little ones.

 

July 10

Teddy Bear Picnic Day. Spend the lunch hour on a blanket under a shade tree with your Teddy Bear.

Stuffed Teddy Bears are a kids favorite. Children receive Teddy Bears early in their childhood. Children cling to them throughout their teenage years. Many bears are kept, even as you become an adult. As you read this article, many of you adults know exactly where your Teddy Bear is.

On this gorgeous summer day, take your teddy bear (or teddy bears) out for a day in the sun. It’s time for a Teddy Bear Picnic! Have mom make a few PB& J sandwiches, some cookies, and a jug of Koolaid. Take a  blanket out under a  shade tree, and enjoy lunch with your Teddy.

Origin of the “teddy bear”

During the early 1900s, President Theodore Roosevelt was in office as President of the United States. He was a hunter. While hunting in Mississippi in 1902, he refused to shoot a small bear. The Washington Post picked up on this story and made a cartoon of the event. Toy store owners, Morris and Rose Michtom, wrote to President Roosevelt for permission to call their stuffed animals “Teddy Bears”. Teddy bears became wildly popular. Their company went on to become the Ideal Toy Company, one of the largest toy companies in the world.

 

July 11

Whether it is for breakfast or a snack, blueberry muffins are melt-in-your-mouth delicious and are honored each year on July 11th, National Blueberry Muffin Day.

Give these blueberry muffin recipes a try!

 

 

July 12

Eat Your Jello Day is observed annually on July 12.

Jell-O, trademarked in 1897 by Pearle Wait of Leroy, New York in 1897, is the novel and fun dessert loved by millions. Francis Woodward, who later purchased the recipe and trademark, eventually made Jell-O a household name.With 21 different flavors, Jell-O satisfies every taste and can be enjoyed in numerous combinations.

Whether it is molded, layered, mixed with fruit or vegetables, Jell-O makes a flavorful dessert or salad that neither breaks a budget or a diet.

Give Jell-O recipes a try such as Judy’s Strawberry Pretzel Salad (I absolutely love this one)or this Applesauce Salad

 

July 13

Each year on July 13, many people will participate in National French Fry Day by enjoying one of the many varieties of the classic food.

French fries, also known as chips, fries, finger chips or French-fried potatoes, are batons of deep-fried potatoes and are common fixtures at fast food restaurants that are loved by adults and kids alike!

A wide selection of condiments such as ketchup, ranch dressing, vinegar, mayonnaise, honey mustard, cheese and many more compliment French fries. Sweet potatoes make an alternate, healthier offering of fries found on menus around the country.  Other varieties are baked and come in unusual shapes such as curls, waffles, crinkle or tornado cut.

The expression “French Fried Potatoes” first occurs in print in English in the 1856 work Cookery for Maids of All Work by E. Warren.

It is believed by some that the term “French” was introduced to the potatoes when the American soldiers arrived in Belgium during World War I and consequently tasted Belgian fries.  It is suggested that they called them “French” as it was the official language of the Belgian Army at that time.

To celebrate National French Fry Day, share some French fries with your kids and have them seasoned, cut and shaped how you like them.

 

July 14

One of the classic comfort foods earns a place of honor on July 14.  It is National Mac and Cheese Day!

Made with macaroni noodles, cream or milk, and the golden goodness of cheese, mac and cheese shines as a side dish but can stand on its own as a main dish as well. From the classic mac and cheese with cheddar or American cheeses to the spicy cowboy mac with bacon and jalapenos, there’s a combination for everyone.  Mix up the cheeses or load up on seasonings, set the broiler for a couple of minutes at the end of the cooking time and let the cheese get a nice toasty crust.

 

July 15

Most of us have the benefit of having more than we need to live. National Give Something Away Day on July 15 gives us an opportunity to share some of our bounty.  

Whether we choose to buy a meal for someone serving our community, donate new shoes or a coat to someone less fortunate or give flowers to brighten someone confined to their home, giving something away will have a positive impact.

In the spirit of National Give Something Away Day, consider paying for the coffee of the person behind you in line. Consider cleaning out your closet or garage and making a donation.  Make a donation to the local food pantry as well. 

HISTORY

National Give Something Away Day was submitted by Linda Eaton Hall-Fulcher. The Registrar at National Day Calendar declared National Give Something Away Day to be observed annually on July 15.

 

July 16 is National Corn Fritters Day! Corn fritters are tasty bites of fried or baked corn batter.

These bright crispy morsels make great additions to summer barbecues and backyard gatherings.  The main ingredients include corn, meal, egg, milk, and butter. While they may have originated in the south, corn fritters can easily be changed up with peppers, onions or herbs to give them regional and seasonal flair.

Paired with other vegetables and a pan-fried fish filet, these versatile cakes can be added to a lightly toasted bun for a unique fish sandwich.  Don’t look at this dish as just a side, but a functional part of a complete dish.  

Head to your local Southern-style restaurant or grab your frying pan to whip up some homemade fritters! Here are a grilled corn fritter and a fresh sweet corn fritter recipe for you to try.

 

July 17th is National Peach Ice Cream Day.

Fresh peaches are at their prime during the month of July.  So, it makes perfect sense to celebrate National Peach Ice Cream Day in July.

Grab your ice cream maker and get the kids to help. Invite your friends and neighbors over for an old-fashioned ice cream social!

 

July 18

On July 18 the lip puckering, eye-watering flavors enjoyed by children and adults alike are featured on this holiday. It is National Sour Candy Day!

In the candy world, sour candy is the young, energetic and fun member of the candy family. With its taste bud-awakening flavors, it adds a punch of youthful energy and a twist of fun to every flavor combination out there. Sour candy comes in a variety of fun shapes and sizes from chewy twists and ropes to sweet bite-sized pieces and straws which can be slipped into a favorite drink.

On National Sour Candy Day, instead of trying regular old candy, celebrate by trying sour candy. It’s like having a birthday and not getting any older!  If you’ve tried sour candy before, try a new flavor or finding out which one makes your mouth pucker the most! Will it be Cherry or Watermelon or maybe a combination of Tangerine-Lemonade? National Sour Candy Day on July 18th is the perfect day to share any of the variety of flavors the American Licorice Company has to offer.

Brighten up your families day with some sour candy 🙂

 

July 19

The National Hot Dog and Sausage Council has designated July as Hot Dog Month and July 19 as  National Hot Dog Day.

Over 25 million hot dogs are sold at baseball stadiums each year.

Whether they are grilled, boiled, broiled, pan-fried, rotisserie cooked, cooked on a stick over a campfire or any other way, hot dogs are a favorite summertime staple.  They are loved by children and adults alike plain or garnished with one or a combination of mustard, ketchup, onions, mayonnaise, relish, cheese, bacon, chili, or sauerkraut.

On May 31, 2012, a world record was set for the most expensive hot dog. The “California Capitol City Dawg” sold for $145.49 at Capitol Dawg in Sacramento, California.  

The “California Capitol City Dawg” features:

  • A grilled 18″ all-beef, in natural casing frank from Chicago
  • served on a fresh-baked herb and oil focaccia roll spread with white truffle butter, then grilled
  • topped with whole grain mustard from France, garlic and herb mayonnaise
  • sauteed chopped shallots, organic mixed baby greens, maple syrup
  • marinated/fruitwood smoked uncured bacon from New Hampshire
  • chopped tomatoes, sweetened dried cranberries, chopped tomato
  • expensive moose cheese from Sweden
  • basil olive oil/pear-cranberry-coconut balsamic vinaigrette and ground peppercorn
  • Proceeds from the sale of each 3 lb. super dog were donated to the Shriners Hospitals for Children.

7-Eleven sells the most grilled hot dogs in North America – 100 million annually.

Have a hot dog any way you want it and get the family together.

HISTORY

The National Hot Dog and Sausage Council created National Hot Dog Day.  The first National Hot Dog Day was established in 1991 to coincide with a hot dog lunch on Capitol Hill every year on the 3rd Wednesday in July.

 

July 20th, National Lollipop Day, is an annual observation of this popular and flavorful treat.

Ever delightful and sweet, lollipops have been satisfying the sweet tooth for generations and possibly for centuries. They may have been a way to preserve nuts and berries in honey during prehistoric times.  Much later when sugar was plentiful, lollipops appeared 16th century Europe.  

In the United States, confectionaries and medicine shops as early as the 1860s sold lollipops in various forms, but it wasn’t until 1908 that George Smith gave lollipops an official 20th-century story.   He gets credit for inventing the modern style lollipop and in 1931 trademarked the name which he claims came from his favorite racing horse, Lolly Pops.

They range from the small size, which can be purchased by the bag full and are also given away at banks, barber shops, and parades, to the very large ones that are made out of candy canes twisted into circles.

LOLLIPOPS IN POP CULTURE

1934 – In the movie Bright Eyes, Shirley Temple sang the song “On the Good Ship Lollipop”.

1939 – The Wizard of Oz brought us a world of characters, including the Lollipop Guild. Armed with a giant spiral sucker, The Lollipop Guild welcomed Dorothy to the Land of Oz.

1969 – How many licks does it take to get to the Tootsie Roll center of a Tootsie Pop. The Tootsie Pop (the trademark name for Tootsie Roll’s lollipop) commercial debuted on U.S. television. The 60-second commercial included a boy, cow, fox, turtle, owl and the narrator.

1973-1978 -The lollipop-loving detective, Kojak, from the TV series of the same name, softened the tough guy while at the same time, toughened up the lollipop.

Get the kids help to make some lollipops with this Jolly Rancher Lollipop Recipe

 

July 21

Each year on July 21st we observe National Junk Food Day.  This day is dedicated to the foods that everyone loves to snack on.  Junk foods by definition are usually high in fats, sugars, salt, and calories and contain very little nutritional value.

Celebrate by consuming your favorite junk food (in moderation). Have a junk food party with the kids where they make their own mix of chips, pretzels, and other junk food items.  You can also celebrate by taking a walk or doing some yard work to burn off those extra calories.

 

On July 22 relax in the shade and enjoy the summer day as it is National Hammock Day.

A hammock, used for swinging, sleeping or resting, is a sling made of fabric, rope or netting, which is suspended between two points such as posts or trees.

  • Developed by natives of Central and South America for sleeping.
  • Were later used aboard ships by sailors for comfort and to maximize space.
  • Early hammocks were woven out of the bark of trees. 

Hammocks are a symbol of summer, leisure, relaxation and simple easy living.  

Have fun trying to stay on a hammock. Make it a game with the kids and give points for how long they can stay on in different positions. It should make for a silly fun day with the family.

 

July 23

National Parents’ Day honors all parents on the fourth Sunday in July. 

In May we celebrated mothers, and in June we celebrated fathers.  It follows that in July we can bring all our parents together and show them some appreciation all at once.  Parents play a vital role in the lives of children.  From the day we are born, parents are our protectors, teachers, providers and role models.  As families, they are the core of our communities.  On National Parents’ Day, we honor all parents do every day to raise up their children in a world that is constantly changing and challenging.

Spend some time with your parents or visit someone who was like a parent to you.  

Milk this one for all its worth! Get the kids to do their chores with no arguments.

HISTORY

National Parents’ Day was established in 1994 when President Bill Clinton signed a Congressional Resolution into Law for “recognizing, uplifting, and supporting the role of parents in the rearing of children.”  The bill was introduced by Republican Senator Trent Lott. 

 

July 24

National Cousins Day is observed each year on July 24.  This is a day to let all of your cousins know how much you appreciate them.

Cousins often spend much time together at family reunions, holidays, birthday parties, weddings, anniversaries and many other countless family get-togethers.  They entertain each other, play and bond while adults are busy with other things.  Cousins often end up being lifelong friends.

Reach out to your cousins or get together with them to let them know they are important to you and your family.

 

July 25 is a day associated with carnival music and children’s laughter as we annually celebrate National Merry-Go-Round Day.

The merry-go-round (also known as a carousel) is an amusement ride that consists of a rotating circular platform with seats on it for its riders.  Its seats are traditionally in rows and are made up of wooden horses or other animals mounted on posts.  Many of they animals are made to move up and down to stimulate galloping and are accompanied by circus music.

-Names of the animals normally consist of Galloper, Jumper, Roundabout, Horseabout and Flying Horses.

Any rotating platform may also be called a merry-go-round. On a playground, it is usually a child-powered rotating platform with bars or handles to which children can cling while riding.

  • The earliest known depiction of the merry-go-round is in 500 A.D. in the Byzantine Empire, which depicts baskets, carrying riders, suspended from a central pole.
  • In the 1840s, Franz Wiesenoffer created the first merry-go-round in the United States in Hessville, Ohio. 
  • July 25, 1871 – The first carousel patent.

To celebrate, find a merry-go-round and have fun. They are not just for the kids, and there is a kid in all of us!

HISTORY

July 25 was chosen as the celebration day for National Merry-Go-Round Day as it coincides with the first United States patent that was issued for the modern carousel.  That patent was awarded to William Schneider of Davenport Iowa on July 25, 1871.

 

July 26

Aunt and Uncle’s Day is observed annually on July 26th.  Spending holidays together, special family times and sometimes sleepovers, aunts and uncles often hold a special place in our hearts. They fill our lives with fun, laughter, love and wonderful memories.  

National Aunt and Uncle’s Day provides an opportunity to spend time with those relatives we trusted and leaned on growing up.  It would be a good time to get out the old photograph albums and look through the pictures, reliving memories of earlier days around the Christmas tree or at the 4th of July picnic or maybe at the beach vacation that was spent with your special aunts and uncles.

To celebrate National Aunt and Uncle’s Day, give them a call, stop by for a visit, send them a card or a bouquet of flowers or maybe take them out for a nice dinner

 

July 27

Each year on the last Thursday of July, hot dog lovers across the United States top their hot dogs with delicious chili to participate in National Chili Dog Day.

Also known as chili con carne or a coney dog, chili dogs often have additional toppings such as onions, cheese, and hot sauce.  There isn’t a limit to the condiments or the heat that can be added to sausages.  Add a little or a lot!

Following are some chili dog recipes for you to enjoy:

 

 

July 28

July celebrates chocolate on the 28th, it is the ever popular National Milk Chocolate Day!  Solid chocolate when combined with either powdered, liquid or condensed milk, is known as milk chocolate.  The most popular of all candy bars sold contain milk chocolate.  Milk chocolate is also a popular ingredient in baking, in specialty coffee drinks and hot chocolate.

Milk had sometimes been used as an addition to chocolate beverages since the mid-17th century, but in 1875 Daniel Peter invented milk chocolate by mixing a powdered milk developed by Henri Nestlé with the liquor.  

Enjoy your favorite milk chocolate.  Create a special treat with one of these recipes:

 

July 29

National Dance Day is observed each year on the last Saturday in July.  Created as a day to raise awareness about and to encourage Americans to embrace dance as a fun and positive way to maintain good health and combat obesity.

National Dance Day achieved national recognition when in 2010, a long-time proponent of healthy lifestyles, American Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, introduced a National Dance Day resolution to promote dance education and physical fitness.

Turn on your children’s favorite song and dance around the living room and just be silly.

HISTORY

National Dance Day was launched in 2010 by  “So You Think You Can Dance” co-creator and Dizzy Feet Foundation co-president Nigel Lythgoe.

 

July 30

National Cheesecake Day is observed annually on July 30th.  Cheesecake is a delicious dessert that is loved by millions around the country.  It is a sweet dessert that is a mixture of soft fresh cheese, cream cheese or cottage cheese, eggs and sugar on a crust made from crushed graham crackers, crushed cookies, pastry or sponge cake.

Cheesecakes can be prepared baked or unbaked, can be flavored and are often served topped with fruit, fruit sauce, chocolate or whipped cream.  There are many flavors in which cheesecakes can be prepared, some of which are blueberry, strawberry, pumpkin, chocolate, key lime, lemon, orange, raspberry or toffee.

It is possible that an ancient form of cheesecake may have been a popular dish in ancient Greece.  It has been found that the earliest attested mention of a cheesecake is by Greek physician Aegimus, who wrote a book on the art of making cheesecakes.

James Kraft developed a form of pasteurized cream cheese in 1912.  In 1928, Kraft acquired the Philadelphia trademark and marketed pasteurized Philadelphia Cream Cheese which is now the most commonly used cheese for cheesecake.

North America has several different styles of cheesecakes:

  • New York-style cheesecake
  • Pennsylvania Dutch-style cheesecake
  • Philadelphia-style
  • Farmer cheese cheesecake
  • Country-style cheesecake
  • Lactose-free cheesecake
  • Cheesecake Kludys
  • Chicago Style Cheesecake
  • Savory cheesecake

 

July 31

National Raspberry Cake Day is jubilantly feasted each year on July 31.  A raspberry cake is a cool and refreshing dessert that is a summertime favorite around the United States.

Raspberries are the edible fruit of a multitude of plant species in the genus Rubus of the rose family.  The name also applies to the plants themselves.

  • Raspberries are woody stemmed perennials. 
  • Raspberries are widely grown in all temperate regions of the World.
  • Raspberries are a very important commercial fruit crop.
  • At one time, raspberries were a midsummer crop. However, with new technology, cultivars, and transportation,
    they can now be obtained year-round. 
  • An individual raspberry weighs 0.11 – 0.18 oz.
  • An individual raspberry is made up of about 100 drupelets.
  • One raspberry bush can yield several hundred berries a year. 
  • A raspberry has a hollow core once it is removed from the receptacle.
  • Raspberries are a rich source of vitamin C, manganese, and dietary fiber.
  • Raspberries contain vitamin B1, vitamin B3, folic acid, magnesium, copper and iron.

Enjoy the following  Raspberry Cake recipe and share it with your friends and family!

 

This is July’s edition of “National Days to Celebrate with the Family. I hope you enjoyed this months selection of day celebrations. Look out for next month’s post on the 26th of July.

Did you find a few things you would like to celebrate with your family? If so. let me know in the comments.

I hope you have a great summer with your family and friends!

 

 

 

Hello, my name is Kristen Osborne I am a happy mother of one beautiful little girl. Very into the internet and trying out new things.

Summer Activities: 83 ideas for the family

The summer time can be a lot of fun. But, other than going to the pool with the kids, what can you do for the almost 90 days of Summer?

I have compiled a few ideas for you to celebrate these hot days with the family.

Also, Summer is not just for the kids, I have added in a few ideas for adults to enjoy the summer as well.

I’m not going to go into much detail on this list, you can run with these ideas as you please. Just trying to give you a list of ideas that you might not think of on your own.

 

SUMMER ACTIVITIES for the Family

    1. Hike a new trail
    2. Create a nature scavenger hunt
    3. Visit a nature center
    4. Check out the state parks
    5. Have a water fight in the backyard (use sponges instead of balloons to avoid choking hazards and plastic waste)
    6. Go to a matinee of drive-in movie
    7. Put bubble solution in a kid pool and use a hula hoop to make giant bubbles
    8. Have a lemonade stand
    9. Catch fireflies at dusk
    10. make fruit popsicles
    11. Have a luau
    12. Watch a movie outside with a projector and a wall
    13. Have a picnic in the yard
    14. Make a fairy garden
    15. Stay up late and look for constellations
    16. Go fishing
    17. Visit a museum
    18. Play frisbee
    19. Play in the rain
    20. Turn on some oldies and have a dance party in the living room
    21. Make a slip and slide in the yard
    22. Go to a ball game
    23. Make homemade ice cream
    24. Make simple origami
    25. Finger paint outside
    26. Draw with sidewalk chalk
    27. Have a puppet show
    28. Make necklaces
    29. Make bird houses
    30. Go to the zoo
    31. Play in the sprinklers
    32. Go to the lake
    33. Check out the Free Kids Workshop at Home Depot
    34. Learn a new card game
    35. Have a backyard campout
    36. Teach kids how to jump rope (or let them teach you)
    37. Fly a kite
    38. Build a fort (inside with blankets or pillows or outside with sticks and leaves)
    39. Join the library’s summer reading club
    40. Make and race paper airplanes
    41. Play flashlight tag
    42. Go to the beach and build sand castles
    43. Play some board games
    44. Play hide and seek
    45. Make some pinwheels (see video at bottom of this list)
    46. Make smoothies
    47. Hunt for bugs
    48. Try skipping stones
    49. Tie-dye some t-shirts
    50. Look for shapes in the clouds
    51. Watch a fireworks show
    52. Go on a boat ride
    53. Get some colored sand and make some sand art bottles
    54. Create your own comic book
    55. Take a mini road trip
    56. Have a family pillow fight
    57. Watch a parade
    58. Go berry picking
    59. Visit an aquarium
    60. Have a build your own pizza night
    61. Make root beer floats (or cream soda floats for those who don’t like root beer)
    62. Go on a family bike ride
    63. Make a sun catcher Suncatchers
    64. Play mini-golf
    65. Build an obstacle course
    66. Have a Beach Boys dance party
    67. Have a watermelon eating contest
    68. Play charades
    69. Light up the dark night with some glow sticks (spin them around and take pictures, they make really cool effects in the dark of the image)
    70. Paint some rocks
    71. Go to the carnival
    72. Have breakfast for dinner and invite the kids to help mix pancakes or dip french toast
    73. Have a banana split party
    74. Play leap frog
    75. Play hopscotch
    76. Make s’mores
    77. Have a BBQ
    78. Make homemade Sno-Cones
    79. Decorate plain flip-flops for the pool
    80. Make your own Wind Chimes
    81. Go roller skating
    82. Make some homemade musical instruments
    83. Volunteer to clean up a local park

 

Take the family dog on a few of these fun activities too. You will all have a great time together.

A Few Summer Activities for Adults this Summer

  • Get Crafty
  • Host a movie night for your adult friends
  • Watch the sunrise/sunset
  • Take a selfie every day to document your summer
  • Jump in the car and try to get lost
  • Start a journal
  • Try out Frisbee golf
  • Go Geocaching Around the World
  • Netflix and relax
  • Go to a Farmer’s Market in your area
  • Plant an herb garden
  • Make a time capsule
  • Take a random weekend road trip
  • Have a yard sale (declutter your home a make a few extra bucks for summer fun)
  • Rent a jet ski
  • Go to a fair or festival
  • Take a hot air balloon ride (or if you’re afraid of heights, just watch them soar by in the sky)

 

Have you found a few ideas to add to your summer fun schedule? I hope so.

I hope you and your family have a wonderfully fun summer!!

Let me know in the comments what you like to do on those hot days of summer.

 

 

 

 

 

Hello, my name is Kristen Osborne I am a happy mother of one beautiful little girl. Very into the internet and trying out new things.