August Days

CELEBRATING NATIONAL DAYS WITH THE FAMILY

AUGUST

 

Every day of the year has a new and wonderful way for you to bond with your little family.

Here are the national days for August that you may not know exist.

Marilyn Dalrymple created Respect for Parents Day which is celebrated annually on August 1st. In an effort to “make our families become united and strong by recognizing the leadership roles parents have, and to reinstate the respect for parents that was evident in the past,”Respect for Parents Day” was born.

This day was created as a reminder that parents deserve and require respect and for all to consider the value that parents have in society.

Let your children know all that you do for them/ Not only because you are their parent but because you love them and want them to do well in life.

National Coloring Book Day is celebrated on August 2.

Coloring and coloring books have always been popular with children, but in the past few years, adults have gotten more and more involved with coloring. I know I have many adult coloring books for relaxing and anxiety relief.

Adult coloring is now a huge trend and many are finding that it is not only fun but also a great way to reduce stress.

Founded in 1941, Dover Publications led the way, releasing their first coloring book for adults, Antique Automobiles Coloring Book, in 1970.

Dover now publishes Creative Haven, a popular line of coloring books specially designed for adult colorists.

Find a coloring party near you or participate online.

Spend some time coloring with your friends, children or grandchildren or by yourself.

Enjoy the creativity of making a picture come to life.

National Watermelon Day is enjoyed by many especially on August 3rd, it is a favorite at summertime events such as picnics, barbecues, and fairs.

Watermelon is 92% water, which is why it is so refreshing. It is a vine-like flowering plant originally from southern Africa. Its fruit, which is also called watermelon, is a special kind referred to by botanists as a pepo, a berry which has a thick rind and fleshy center. The watermelon fruit, loosely considered a type of melon – although not in the genus Cucumis – has a smooth exterior rind (usually green with dark green stripes or yellow spots) and a juicy, sweet interior flesh usually deep red to pink, but sometimes orange, yellow, or white.

Watermelons can grow enormous, and you will find competitions across the country which award prizes each year for the largest one.

The Guinness Book of World Records states that the heaviest watermelon weighed 262 pounds.

To learn more refreshing watermelon facts, check out www.watermelon.org.

National Chocolate Chip Cookie Day is observed annually on August 4.

This is a day to enjoy those tasty bits of chocolate in your favorite cookies.

For the same reason we thank Ruth Graves Wakefield for chocolate chips, we also celebrate her name on National Chocolate Chip Cookie Day. For if it weren’t for her curiosity and invention, we wouldn’t hover around ovens savoring the moment the timer dings.

If she had never wondered what chunks of chocolate would taste like mixed into a sugar cookie dough, we would know the ecstasy that is a warm chocolate chip cookie melting on our tongue, our eyes closing in heavenly satisfaction and perfect smiles crowning our faces.  No, if it weren’t for Ruth Graves Wakefield, entire generations would have been denied the bliss that is a chocolate chip cookie.

Grab your discs and call up your friends! The first Saturday in August is National Disc Golf Day!

Requiring less equipment than traditional golf, disc golf shares the common goal of reaching each target with the fewest number of strokes, or to put it more accurately, throws.

Disc golf parallels the traditional game in many ways. Instead of clubs and a ball, the only gear necessary is a disc or frisbee. Starting from a tee pad, which is generally a rectangular area made of anything from rubber to cement or even brick, the player progresses down the fairway after each throw.

From where the disc lands, the player throws again and repeats until the disc lands in the target. As in traditional golf, the total number of throws a player takes to get the disc into the target is equal to the score for that hole.

Disc golf has been played since the late 1960s and became a formalized sport in the 1970s.

In the beginning, targets were nothing more than tree trunks or wooden posts cemented into the ground. As the game progressed, trees and posts were replaced with metal baskets with chains, with the chains helping to catch the discs. Those metal baskets, originally called a “Disc Golf Pole Hole”, are now the modern day targets with dozens of design variations being used with the same general idea and technical specifications in mind.

Disc golf is convenient and inexpensive as well. Adding a couple of discs in the mix when packing for vacation adds very little weight to camping gear or luggage. Unlike traditional golf, a majority of disc golf courses across the country are open to the public, requiring no fees, membership, or tee times.

As a growing international sport, the number of courses is increasing all the time.

In August of 2015, the International Olympic Committee granted full recognition to Flying Disc sports providing a global platform for Flying Disc sports, including disc golf.

People of all ages and abilities play disc golf. A great low-impact, cardiovascular workout that can test both physical skill and mental determination, this activity brings the whole family together for an afternoon of laughs and enjoyment together.

HOW TO OBSERVE

The Professional Disc Golf Association encourages you to get out on the course to celebrate National Disc Golf Day.

With courses in all 50 states, it should be easy to find a disc golf course near you and play a round with your family.

The PDGA Disc Golf Course Directory is a great resource to locate courses in your area.

Each year on August 6, people around the country participate in National Wiggle Your Toes Day.

By going barefoot, wearing sandals or flip-flops, show off your toes. Be sure to give them some fresh air and exercise on National Wiggle Your Toes Day!

Today, let your toes feel the grass, the sand on the beach, the water in the pool or the pebbles along the shore. Encourage the kids to wiggle their little toes to some music!

Observed annually on August 7, National Lighthouse Day honors the beacon of light that for hundreds of years symbolized safety and security for ships and boats at sea.

At one time, the beacon of light could be found across almost all of America’s shorelines.

A lighthouse is described as a tower, building or any other type of structure that is designed to emit light from a system of lamps and lenses and used as an aid to navigation for maritime pilots at sea or on inland waterways.

Lighthouses:

  • Mark dangerous coastlines, hazardous shoals, reefs, safe entries to harbors.
  • Assist in aerial navigation.
  • Have declined due to the expense of maintenance and replacement by modern electronic navigational systems.
  • Has a source of light called a “lamp” (may be electric or oil fueled).
  • Were originally lit by open fire and then candles.
  • Differ depending on the location and purpose but have standard components.
  • Has a lantern room which is a glassed-in housing at the top of a lighthouse tower.
  • Has a Watch Room or Service Room beneath the lantern room.
  • Has an open gallery outside the Watch Room or Lantern Room.
  • Development accelerated in the 17th century with Britain’s Trinity House constructing its first in 1609.
  • Earliest in North America was in St. Augustine, Florida.  Printed on a 1791 map, it had been built by Menendez after his landing in 1586.
  • America’s next lighthouse was Boston Light on Little Brewster Island in 1716.
  • The oldest existing lighthouse in the United States is the Sandy Hook Lighthouse in New Jersey. Built in 1764, this lighthouse is still in operation.
  • At the end of the 19th century, the United States had the most lighthouses of any nation.
  • The 9th Act of the first Congress created the US Bureau of Lighthouses in 1789, which placed lighthouses under federal control.
  • The United States Coast Guard took over on July 7, 1939.
  • Visiting and photographing lighthouses has become a popular hobby as well as collecting ceramic replicas.

Take a nice road trip with your family to visit a historical lighthouse. (If you are in the area I highly recommend the Cape May Lighthouse).

National Happiness Happens Day is observed each year on August 8.

So on this day… just let it happen. You know. Happiness.

Happiness is encouraged all day. Recognize every moment of glee, joy, delight, and pleasure. Don’t let it pass.

A flicker of a giggle should be given its due and should it blossom into full blown happiness, don’t be surprised. It happens!

The Secret Society of Happy People is an organization that was founded in August of 1998 and formed to celebrate the expression of happiness.

The society encourages members to recognize their happy moments and think about happiness in their daily life. They have two motto’s which include “Happiness Happens” and “Don’t Even Think of Raining on My Parade.” Their purpose is to stimulate people’s right to express their happiness.

Founded in 1999 by the Secret Society of Happy People as “Admit You’re Happy Day”, Happiness Happens Day was created to recognize and express happiness. August 8 was chosen as it is the anniversary of the first membership in 1998.

Observed each year on August 9, avid readers get to celebrate on National Book Lovers Day!

A day for all those who love to read, National Book Lovers Day encourages you to find your favorite reading place, a good book (whether it be fiction or non-fiction) and read the day away.

Bibliophile – a person who has a great appreciation for or collects books.

Some History about books:

  • The very first books used parchment or vellum (calf skin) for the book pages.
  • The book covers were made of wood and often covered with leather.
  • The books were fitted with clasps or straps.
  • Public libraries appeared in the Middle Ages.
  • Books in public libraries were often chained to a bookshelf or a desk to prevent theft.

Moving forward:

Book manufacturing’s recent development included digital printing.

Book pages are printed using toner rather than ink. Digital printing opens up the possibility of print-on-demand, where no books are printed until after an order is received from a customer.

E-books are rapidly increasing in popularity. E-book (electronic book) refers to a book-length publication in digital form. They are usually available through the internet. However, can also be found on CD-ROM and other forms. E-books are read either by computer or via a portable book display device known as an e-book reader, such as a Reader, Nook or Kindle.

Grab some books with the kids and enjoy a nice time reading together. Let the books take you to far off places in your minds.

It is National Lazy Day, so we choose to be lazy rather than tell you that this holiday is observed each year on August 10th.

Just sit back, relax with a glass of lemonade and enjoy being with your family on this lazy day.

Each year on August 11, parents across the United States participate in National Son’s and Daughter’s Day.

On this day, spend time with the joys of your life.

Let your children know that you are glad they are part of your life.

Share family stories, listen to the events of their day, their hopes, and dreams.

Enjoy every day you have with them and spend as much quality time as you can.

Do something special for your children today.

If they are at home, go for a walk or enjoy a local park.

If your children are grown, give them a call and remind them how special they are to you.

Saturdays and Summertime are the perfect combinations for garage sales.

That is why the second Saturday in August is designated National Garage Sale Day.

On this day, you will see people finding great deals at these neighborhood sales.

For those having the sales, this is a way for them to find new homes for items they no longer need.

If you see a driveway full of items and a sale sign out, stop by and celebrate National Garage Sale Day.

Daniel Rhodes of Alabama came up with the idea of having a National Garage Sale Day in 2001 after seeing neighbors having sales on different weekends.

Rhodes thought it would be more convenient if they all had them on the same weekend.

Left-Hander’s Day is observed annually on August 13th.

In a right-handed dominated world, August 13th is the day that left-handed individuals can claim as their own.

Approximately 10% of the population is a Southpaw. Scientists haven’t discovered why a person is left-handed, but it more probable that you will have a left-handed child if one of the parents is left-handed.

Make a game with the kids, If you’re all right-handed, try doing everything with your left hand and see who can complete certain tasks.

National Creamsicle Day is observed annually on August 14.

This is a day to enjoy this refreshing summertime orange and vanilla treat.

Creamsicle” is a brand name of an ice cream treat consisting of vanilla ice cream on a Popsicle stick coated with an exterior of flavored ice with the original flavor being orange.

Enjoyed the whole year round, the Creamsicle now comes in many flavors.

Here are a few Creamsicle recipes for you to make and enjoy with the kids!

Three Ingredient Low-Fat Creamsicle Cake
Orange Creamsicle Cupcakes

National Relaxation Day is observed annually on August 15th.

It is time to slow down, unwind and relax!

National Relaxation Day is an important day as we all need a break from the fast-paced and often hectic lifestyles we live.

Taking time to recuperate and rejuvenate our tired minds and bodies may help prevent many health risks. Like the founder of this day suggested, too much work can make us sick, run down, and tired which can lead to more stress.

It has been proven that stress can be harmful to our health, both mentally and physically.

Most doctors will agree that finding ways to relax and reduce stress will improve overall health.

What is your favorite relaxation activity?

Here are some relaxing activities:

  • Reading a book
  • Fishing
  • A picnic in the park
  • Walking along the beach
  • Taking a drive in the country
  • Spa
  • Golfing
  • Photography
  • A movie
  • Window shopping
  • Calm
  • Lunch with the family
  • Watching sports
  • Swimming

These are just a few of the many possible relaxation ideas that you may want to use to celebrate this holiday.

We are aware that not everyone is able to get this holiday off from work, so while you are at your job, do what you can to avoid stress and try not to work late today.

When you get off of work, take a deep breath, unwind, relax and begin your National Relaxation Day celebration!

What would be better than a day filled with laughter?

National Tell a Joke Day is observed annually on August 16th, and that’s no joke!

This day should be filled with smiles and much laughter from morning till night as everyone shares their favorite jokes. The more jokes you tell, the more fun you will have and so will those around you.

Jokes have been a part of human culture since at least 1900 BC.

A joke is described as something that is spoken, written or done with humorous intention. They can come in many forms.

On National Tell a Joke Day, try a one-liner or a knock-knock joke if you aren’t comfortable with the whole comedic act that can be involved in the short story versions.

Some simply rely on gestures to express humor. With humor, timing and delivery can be an essential element. Without it, the joke will fall flat.

Be sure to know the audience. Clown jokes may not go over well at a phobia convention.

In moderation, laughter is healthy, uses the abdominal muscles and releases endorphins (natural feel good” chemicals) into the brain.

Tell a joke, listen to a joke, get a joke book and get the kids to take turns reading a few… laugh, celebrate, have fun and enjoy!

National I LOVE My Feet Day! is observed annually on August 17.

This is a day to appreciate how valuable our feet are, to practice good foot care and pamper our feet.

Our feet are our primary mode of transportation. They quietly and faithfully help us stand, swim, run, walk, play sports, jog, skip and dance.

They take us to school and work. Our feet withstand all the things we do in our everyday lives and accomplish things our hands cannot.

Taking care of our feet is important for preventing long-term problems. Years of wear and tear can be hard on them, as can disease, bad circulation, improperly trimmed toenails and poorly fitting shoes.

Practicing good foot care is easy. Elevating your feet when you sit is a relaxing way to help reduce swelling. Stretching, walking or having a gentle foot massage aids circulation.

A warm foot bath is also helpful. Make sure your feet are dry before putting on shoes. Wearing shoes when outside provides your feet better protection.

75% of the adult population has a foot problem and improper shoe choices account for the majority of those problems. Wearing properly fitted shoes with good arch support, getting foot massages and regular pedicures can reduce foot problems. If you have persistent foot pain, consulting a podiatrist can help.

A good way to celebrate today would be going out and buying your children’s new school shoes. Let them pick out their favorite, most comfortable pair for the coming school year.

On August 18, we recognize a dish sizzling with savory Tex-Mex flavor.

It’s National Fajita Day!

Originally made from throwaway cuts of beef by Mexican cowboys/cattle drivers in Southwest Texas, the fajita was developed as a regional staple in the early 1930s.

These cowboys cooked the steak over an open fire or grill and served it with flour or corn tortillas. Fresh Pico de gallo (also called salsa fresca, made from chopped tomato, onion, cilantro, fresh serranos, salt, and lime juice), guacamole and southwestern spices elevated the fajita, introducing it to new audiences as it later became a destination food in the culinary world.

As their popularity grew, fajitas added colorful flair to Tex-Mex menus with sizzling platters full of bright peppers, onions, tender steak, shrimp, chicken or pork with freshly made tortillas.

By the 1980s, most Mexican restaurants in the United States served fajitas. In the modern culinary kitchen, lime, cilantro and many vegetables find their way into a fajita along with the perfect seasonings.

Grilling with mesquite adds a smoky flavor and bacon adds crunch. Of course, who could forget the cheese?

With their festive presentations, they continue to be enjoyed today. The fajita has come a long way from skirt steak trimmings!

This year National Fajita Day falls on a Friday so take the family out to your favorite Mexican restaurant for fajitas and start the weekend off right!

National Soft Ice Cream Day is observed annually on August 19th.

Soft service ice cream is the result of air being introduced to the dairy product during the freezing process.

In 1934 on Memorial Day weekend, Tom Carvel had a flat tire on his ice cream truck in Hartsdale, New York. After pulling into a parking lot, he began selling the softened ice cream to vacationers driving by.

With amazement, seeing the love that people had for soft ice cream, he concluded that a fixed location selling the new-found dessert was potentially a good business idea.

In 1936, Carvel opened his first store on the original broken down truck site, selling his secret formula soft serve ice cream dispensed from his patented super low-temperature ice cream machines.

If an ice cream truck frequents your street make sure to get some for yourself and the kids. If not, take a ride after dinner to an ice cream shoppe to get some soft serve goodness.

Each year on August 20th, National Radio Day recognizes the great invention of the radio.

In the late 19th century, it became clear that wireless communication was possible.

There were several inventors who had a part in the invention of the radio in the late 1800s and not just one person can be credited with its beginning. To make the radio a reality, it required a number of different inventions and discoveries including both transmission and reception methods as well as technology.

It was in the 1920s when the first broadcast stations began airing programs.

These first programs were those of news and world events.

  • Radio ownership grew from two out of five homes in 1931 to four out of five homes in 1938.
  • According to FCC statistics, at the end of 2012, there were more than 15,000 licensed broadcast radio stations in the U.S.

To celebrate National Radio Day, listen to your favorite radio stations and let the kids dance around and sing along.

Each year on August 21, there are various events and activities held across the United States in recognition of National Senior Citizens Day.

This day was created as a day to support, honor and show appreciation to our seniors and to recognize their achievements.

Their valuable contributions to our communities create better places to live.

For all they have achieved throughout life and for all they continue to accomplish, we owe older citizens our thanks and a heartfelt salute. We can best demonstrate our gratitude and esteem by making sure that our communities are good places in which to mature and grow older — places in which older people can participate to the fullest and can find the encouragement, acceptance, assistance, and services they need to continue to lead lives of independence and dignity”

~ President Ronald Reagan – August 19, 1988 Proclamation 5847

To celebrate National Senior Citizens Day, spend time with the senior citizens you know. Let them know that they are appreciated and loved.

It may also be a good day for you and your children to volunteer at a retirement home and share your smile with those who may not otherwise get a visitor today. Teach them that being nice to others is not just for those people but to help us be happy knowing we are the reason those people are smiling and having a good time.

National Tooth Fairy Day observed on August 22.

This childhood favorite evolved with a group of healthcare fairies during the mid-1920s.

From bath fairies to Fairy Wand Tooth Whitener, kids were encouraged through a wave of advertisements and health classes to eat their veggies, brush their teeth and get fresh air.

Esther Watkins Arnold brought the tooth fairy to life in an eight-page play-let in 1927 called The Tooth Fairy.

At the same time, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle made his claim that fairies and gnomes were real by publishing pictures of two girls surrounded by “verified” fairies.

Schools began performing Arnold’s play the following year, and children, primed with vivid imaginations, placed their freshly lost teeth under their pillows at night in the hopes of a visit from the tooth fairy.

Enjoy the last days of summer and the warm summer breezes on August 23 as you celebrate the annual National Ride the Wind Day.

National Ride The Wind Day commemorates the anniversary of the first human-powered flight to win the Kremer prize.

It was on August 23rd of 1977 that the Gossamer Condor 2, flew the first figure-eight course specified by the Royal Aeronautical Society, at Minter Field in Shafter, California. Slowly cruising at only 11 mph, it traveled a distance of 2,172 meters.

  • The Gossamer Condor 2 was built by Dr. Paul B MacCready and piloted by amateur cyclist and hang-glider pilot Bryan Allen.

  • The Gossamer Condor 2 aircraft is preserved at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum.

We all know that cooler air is right around the corner so take advantage of these nice days and get outside as much as possible. Test out those human-powered aircraft and make some history. summer breezes allow us to fly human-powered. In the event you lack a human-powered aircraft, flying a kite is always a good back plan.

The first United States patent for a waffle iron was issued to Cornelius Swarthout of Troy, New York on August 24, 1869.

In honor of this anniversary, National Waffle Day is observed each year on August 24th.

Eaten throughout the world, a waffle is a leavened batter or dough that is cooked between two plates that are patterned to give a characteristic size, shape and surface impression.

Waffles come in many forms. Depending on the type of batter or iron used, the resulting waffle vary by consistency, size, shape and flavor.

Waffle irons and waffles originated around the 14th century.

An anonymous husband penned the first known waffle recipe as a set of instructions for his wife.

According to the manuscript, Le Ménagier de Paris, each of the four recipes began:

  • Beat some eggs in a bowl, season with salt and add wine.

  • Toss in some flour, and mix.

  • Then fill, little by little, two irons at a time with as much of the paste as a slice of cheese is large.

  • Then close the iron and cook both sides.

  • If the dough does not detach easily from the iron, coat it first with a piece of cloth that has been soaked in oil or grease.

  • 1911 – First electric waffle iron introduced by General Electric.
  • 1953– Frank Dorsa’s Eggo Frozen Waffles are sold in Supermarkets for the first time.
  • 1964 – Belgian Waffles debut at New York’s World’s Fair.

Following are a few waffle recipes for you to make and share with your family and friends!

True Belgian Waffles
Classic Buttermilk Waffles
Apple Cinnamon Waffles
Banana Oatmeal Buttermilk Waffles
Best Chocolate Chip Waffles

National Banana Split Day is observed annually on August 25th!

Traditionally served in a long dish, called a boat, a banana is cut in half lengthwise and laid in the dish with scoops of vanilla, chocolate and strawberry ice cream placed in between.

The strawberry ice cream is complimented with pineapple topping.

Chocolate syrup is poured on the vanilla ice cream and strawberry topping covers the chocolate ice cream.

Crushed nuts, whipped cream and maraschino cherries garnish the entire boat.

Today, there are many variations to the classic banana split.

A 23-year-old apprentice pharmacist at Tassel’s Pharmacy in Latrobe, Pennsylvania created the first banana split in 1904.

David Evans Strickler enjoyed inventing sundaes at the store’s soda fountain. His first “banana-based triple ice cream sundae” sold for 10 cents, double the cost of all the other sundaes.

In Strickler’s hometown of Latrobe, Pennsylvania, they proudly celebrate his creation with a festival annually in August.

In 2013, an official marker was placed at the site of the pharmacy where Strickler first made his famous banana split.

The United States Post Office honored the banana split and the town of Latrobe in 2016 with a 47-cent “forever stamp depicting the banana split.

It was one of five stamps in the “Soda Fountain Favorites” series.

For a time, Latrobe residents could receive a cancellation mark memorializing their claim to fame.

Each summer on the 26th of August, Popsicle lovers across the United States enjoy National Cherry Popsicle Day.

One evening in 1905, 11-year-old Frank Epperson mixed a batch of soda on his porch and left it with the stirring stick still in it for the night. It hit record low temps that night and he awoke to find….

To learn more and to get some tasty Popsicle recipes see my post “Popsicles… Where did they come from?”

Each year on August 27th it is National Just Because Day.

Feel free to celebrate this day any way you choose. Just because!

Every day we all do things that are expected or required of us or because we have to.

Well, on National Just Because Day, that does not apply.

This day is a chance to do something without rhyme or reason.

It could be that there is an outfit at the mall that you are admiring; buy it…just because.


Maybe you want to use a vacation day just to go fishing; do it…just because.


Perhaps you would like to pay the tab for the table next to you at your favorite restaurant; do it…just because.


Possibly you want to sing really loud while you’re in your car, by yourself, with your windows rolled down; do it…just because.


Surprise someone with flowers…just because!


Make something up…just because!


Or maybe, just maybe, do something just because Mom said so.

 

National Cherry Turnovers Day is observed annually on August 28th.

Cherry turnovers are a sweet pastry made by placing a cherry filling on a piece of dough, folding the dough over, sealing it then either baking it or frying it.

FUN CHERRY FACTS:

  • Related to plums, peaches, and nectarines, cherries are drupes or stone fruits.
  • Cherries were brought to North America in the 1600s by the English colonists.
  • There are more than 1,000 varieties of cherries in the United States.
  • There are an average of 44 cherries in one pound.

More National Cherry Holidays:

  • January 3rd is National Chocolate Covered Cherry Day.
  • April 23rd is National Cherry Cheesecake Day.
  • May 17th is National Cherry Cobbler Day.
  • September 24th is National Cherries Jubilee Day.

Try these recipes with your kids today!

Tasty Cherry Turnovers

Easy Cherry Turnovers

 

National Chop Suey Day is recognized each year on August 29.

Chop suey, which means “assorted pieces,” is a dish in American Chinese cuisine consisting of meat (chicken, fish, beef, prawns or pork) and eggs that are cooked quickly with vegetables (usually bean sprouts, cabbage, and celery) and bound in a starch-thickened sauce. Rice typically accompanies this delicious dish.

It is believed, by some, that chop suey was invented in America by Chinese Americans.

However, anthropologist E.N. Anderson concludes that it is based on tsap seui (miscellaneous leftovers) which is common in Taishan, a district of Guangdong Province.

Taishan is the home of many early Chinese immigrants to the United States.

Another account claims that chop suey was invented by Chinese American cooks that were working on the transcontinental railroad in the 19th century.

A tale is told of chop suey’s creation stemming from the Qing Dynasty Premier Li Hongzhang’s visit to the United States in 1896. According to the story, his chef wanted to create a meal that was suitable for both the Chinese and the American palates.

It has also been told that Li wandered to a local Chinese restaurant after the hotel kitchen closed, where the chef, embarrassed that he had nothing ready to offer, came up with the new “chop suey” dish using scraps of leftovers.

Another myth tells of an 1860s Chinese restaurant cook in San Francisco that was forced to serve something to the drunken miners after hours. To avoid a beating, having nothing fresh to offer, he threw leftovers in a wok and provided a makeshift meal to the miners. The miners loved the dish, asked him what it was called to which he replied, “Chopped Sui.”

Traveling to the United States in 1903, Liang Oichao, a Guangdong native, wrote that there existed a food item called chop suey which was popularly served by Chinese restaurateurs, but which local Chinese people did not eat.

Whatever is the true origin the fact is that it is very tasty. Take your family out for a nice Chinese dinner to celebrate Chop Suey Day.

On August 30 be sure to stock up on one of America’s favorite fire roasted treats. It’s National Toasted Marshmallow Day!

Get your friends together, gather up some firewood, a few long sticks and a bag of marshmallow and you have the makings of a great night ahead of you.

Toasted marshmallows are a special part of summer evenings around a bonfire.

One of the popular ways to enjoy a delicious warm, gooey toasted marshmallow is with chocolate and graham crackers in a S’more.

Upon personal preference, marshmallows are heated to various degrees from gently toasted to a charred outer layer.

The charred outer layer is achieved by igniting the marshmallow.

Marshmallows now come in a variety of flavors as well as sizes for maximum toasting opportunities.

National Toasted Marshmallow Day is sponsored by the National Confectioners Association.

Get the kids together and char some marshmallows together.

Observed annually on August 31, National Trail Mix Day honors the mix that was developed as a healthy snack to be taken along on hikes.

Trail mix is an ideal hike snack food because it is very lightweight, easy to store, nutritious and provides a quick energy boost from the carbohydrates in the dried fruits or granola as well as sustained energy from the fats in the nuts.

One claim to the invention is held by two California surfers, who in 1968 blended peanuts and raisins together for an energy snack.

However, in the 1958 novel The Dharma Bums written by Jack Kerouac, trail mix is mentioned when the two main characters describe the planned meals in preparation for their hiking trip.

Plan a short hiking trip with your family and pack a few bags of tasty trail mix to snack on along the way.

You can make your own trail mix using your favorite ingredients.

Many varieties of trail mix are available at your favorite grocery or convenience store.

 

I hope you have enjoyed the August Edition of Celebrating National Days with the Family.

If you found any fun things to do with your family from this list please let me know in the comments.

I hope everyone has a happy safe end of the summer. 🙂

Stay Cool.

Hello, my name is Kristen Osborne I am a happy mother of one beautiful little girl. Very into the internet and trying out new things.

Summer Activities: 83 ideas for the family

The summer time can be a lot of fun. But, other than going to the pool with the kids, what can you do for the almost 90 days of Summer?

I have compiled a few ideas for you to celebrate these hot days with the family.

Also, Summer is not just for the kids, I have added in a few ideas for adults to enjoy the summer as well.

I’m not going to go into much detail on this list, you can run with these ideas as you please. Just trying to give you a list of ideas that you might not think of on your own.

 

SUMMER ACTIVITIES for the Family

    1. Hike a new trail
    2. Create a nature scavenger hunt
    3. Visit a nature center
    4. Check out the state parks
    5. Have a water fight in the backyard (use sponges instead of balloons to avoid choking hazards and plastic waste)
    6. Go to a matinee of drive-in movie
    7. Put bubble solution in a kid pool and use a hula hoop to make giant bubbles
    8. Have a lemonade stand
    9. Catch fireflies at dusk
    10. make fruit popsicles
    11. Have a luau
    12. Watch a movie outside with a projector and a wall
    13. Have a picnic in the yard
    14. Make a fairy garden
    15. Stay up late and look for constellations
    16. Go fishing
    17. Visit a museum
    18. Play frisbee
    19. Play in the rain
    20. Turn on some oldies and have a dance party in the living room
    21. Make a slip and slide in the yard
    22. Go to a ball game
    23. Make homemade ice cream
    24. Make simple origami
    25. Finger paint outside
    26. Draw with sidewalk chalk
    27. Have a puppet show
    28. Make necklaces
    29. Make bird houses
    30. Go to the zoo
    31. Play in the sprinklers
    32. Go to the lake
    33. Check out the Free Kids Workshop at Home Depot
    34. Learn a new card game
    35. Have a backyard campout
    36. Teach kids how to jump rope (or let them teach you)
    37. Fly a kite
    38. Build a fort (inside with blankets or pillows or outside with sticks and leaves)
    39. Join the library’s summer reading club
    40. Make and race paper airplanes
    41. Play flashlight tag
    42. Go to the beach and build sand castles
    43. Play some board games
    44. Play hide and seek
    45. Make some pinwheels (see video at bottom of this list)
    46. Make smoothies
    47. Hunt for bugs
    48. Try skipping stones
    49. Tie-dye some t-shirts
    50. Look for shapes in the clouds
    51. Watch a fireworks show
    52. Go on a boat ride
    53. Get some colored sand and make some sand art bottles
    54. Create your own comic book
    55. Take a mini road trip
    56. Have a family pillow fight
    57. Watch a parade
    58. Go berry picking
    59. Visit an aquarium
    60. Have a build your own pizza night
    61. Make root beer floats (or cream soda floats for those who don’t like root beer)
    62. Go on a family bike ride
    63. Make a sun catcher Suncatchers
    64. Play mini-golf
    65. Build an obstacle course
    66. Have a Beach Boys dance party
    67. Have a watermelon eating contest
    68. Play charades
    69. Light up the dark night with some glow sticks (spin them around and take pictures, they make really cool effects in the dark of the image)
    70. Paint some rocks
    71. Go to the carnival
    72. Have breakfast for dinner and invite the kids to help mix pancakes or dip french toast
    73. Have a banana split party
    74. Play leap frog
    75. Play hopscotch
    76. Make s’mores
    77. Have a BBQ
    78. Make homemade Sno-Cones
    79. Decorate plain flip-flops for the pool
    80. Make your own Wind Chimes
    81. Go roller skating
    82. Make some homemade musical instruments
    83. Volunteer to clean up a local park

 

Take the family dog on a few of these fun activities too. You will all have a great time together.

A Few Summer Activities for Adults this Summer

  • Get Crafty
  • Host a movie night for your adult friends
  • Watch the sunrise/sunset
  • Take a selfie every day to document your summer
  • Jump in the car and try to get lost
  • Start a journal
  • Try out Frisbee golf
  • Go Geocaching Around the World
  • Netflix and relax
  • Go to a Farmer’s Market in your area
  • Plant an herb garden
  • Make a time capsule
  • Take a random weekend road trip
  • Have a yard sale (declutter your home a make a few extra bucks for summer fun)
  • Rent a jet ski
  • Go to a fair or festival
  • Take a hot air balloon ride (or if you’re afraid of heights, just watch them soar by in the sky)

 

Have you found a few ideas to add to your summer fun schedule? I hope so.

I hope you and your family have a wonderfully fun summer!!

Let me know in the comments what you like to do on those hot days of summer.

 

 

 

 

 

Hello, my name is Kristen Osborne I am a happy mother of one beautiful little girl. Very into the internet and trying out new things.

Celebrating National Days in June with the Kids

I love finding the information for these posts. Usually, I use the National Days Calendar Website.

There are a few different ones to choose from on each day of the month. I pick out the best (in my opinion) that can be celebrated with children.

Mostly, I look for activities on each day that our children would be happy to participate in with us.

This month I found one day where it is just the “adults” who will be celebrating. Read on to find out what I mean by that.

Also, if you would like to find out what the other days are, feel free to go to the website I cited above.

Now, onto the National Days for June…

 

Observed each year on June 1st, Thursday is  National Pen Pal Day is a way to let your pen pals know how much they mean to you. The day is the perfect day to send special letters and gifts to your pen pals.

A pen pal is someone with whom you correspond by writing letters, sharing personal events and many times have never even met.

In this age of technology, I think it would be a nice change of pace to teach our children how to write a proper letter. Ask your child to choose a friend from school to write a letter to and hopefully, they will start a pen pal friendship.
HISTORY
National Pen Pal Day was created by American pen-palist, Rosie Tholl, who has traveled around the world to meet some of her pen pals. She was also the co-coordinator of the Illinois Pen Pal Picnic Reunion and is co-found and co-coordinator for Pen Pals United.

 

Each year on the first Friday in June, this year June 2nd people participate in National Doughnut or Donut Day. This day celebrates the doughnut and honors the Salvation Army Lassies, the women that served doughnuts to soldiers during WWI.

In 1917, the original “Salvation Army Doughnut” was first served by the ladies of the Salvation Army. It was during WWI that the Salvation Army Lassies went to the front lines of Europe. Home cooked foods, provided by these brave volunteers, were a morale boost to the troops.

The doughnuts were often cooked in oil inside the metal helmets of American soldiers. American infantrymen were then commonly called “doughboys.” A more standard spelling is donut.
On this day, many bakeries and coffee shops in the United States offer doughnut deals to their customers. So take the kids out for a nice treat.

HISTORY

National Doughnut Day was created by The Salvation Army in 1938 to honor the women who served the doughnuts to soldiers in World War I. This day began as a fund-raiser for Chicago’s Salvation Army. The goal of their 1938 fund-raiser was to help the needy during the Great Depression.

 

Observed on June 3rd, National Repeat Day could be an opportunity for some and a bad omen for others.

Repeating a foot massage or a day with a dear friend would make this holiday special. Repeating a root canal or surgery are not suggested for this day.
Another way to celebrate is by repeating some of the simple tasks of the day. Wash the dishes twice. Make the same meal for lunch as you do for supper. Watch the same movie twice. The 1993 film Groundhog Day comes to mind. Send duplicate text messages. Play a game with the kids that entail repeating different tasks.

Have a great day! Have a great day!
National Cheese Day is observed annually on June 4th.

Cheese is produced from the pressed curds of milk. The milk can come from cows, buffalo, goats or sheep. Temperature and aging affect the flavor and texture of the cheese as well as spices and other seasonings added during the process.
Excellent as a snack on its own, cheese is also a perfect ingredient in pasta, soups, souffle and many other recipes.
There are many ways to celebrate National Cheese Day. Add cheese to a sandwich, enjoy a pizza or try a new variety of cheese on crackers.

Give your children the job of coming up with fun recipes for cheese snacks to enjoy together.

Many people are familiar with the gingerbread house at Christmas time, however, there are some delicious gingerbread bread, cake, bars, biscuit and cookie recipes that are perfect any time of the year. Each year on June 5th, gingerbread lovers across the nation observe National Gingerbread Day, a day that was created to bring attention to gingerbread.
The term “gingerbread” originally referred to preserved ginger, later referring to a confection made up of honey and spices.
Gingerbread is a sweet food that typically uses honey or molasses rather than just sugar and is flavored with ginger. Gingerbread foods range from a soft, moist loaf cake to something closer to a ginger biscuit.

It is believed that gingerbread was first brought to Europe in 992 by an Armenian monk. He lived there for seven years teaching gingerbread cooking to the French priests and Christians until his death in 999.

Sources indicate that in 1444, Swedish nuns were baking gingerbread to ease indigestion.
In the 17th century, gingerbread biscuits were sold in monasteries, pharmacies and town square farmers markets. During the 18th century, Gingerbread became widely available.

Following are a few gingerbread recipes for you to make and enjoy with the kids!

Favorite Old Fashioned Gingerbread
Gingerbread Pancakes with Fruit Topping
Gingerbread-Cupcakes

 

Every year on June 6th we recognize the fun holiday, National Yo-Yo Day. This day celebrates this historic toy. It is the perfect day to get out your yo-yo’s and try your hand at The Sleeper, Walk the Dog, Shooting the Moon, Around the World or Hop the Fence.

A yo-yo is an object that consists of an axle connected to two disks and a length of string looped around the axle. It is played by holding the free end of the string, allowing gravity or the force of a throw to spin the yo-yo and unwind the string, then allowing the yo-yo to wind itself back again. This is called “yoyoing”.

It is believed that the yo-yo was first invented in ancient Greece. There is a Greek vase painting, from 500 BC, that shows a boy playing with a yo-yo.

The yo-yo was made popular in America when Donald F. Duncan, Sr. manufactured the Duncan Yo-Yo in the early 1900s. The name “Yo-Yo” was first registered as a trademark in 1932.

In 1999, the Duncan Yo-Yo was inducted into the National Toy Hall of Fame at The Strong in Rochester, New York.
The National Yo-Yo Museum is located in Chico, California.
Yo-yoing is a term often used to describe a person fluctuating between two difficult decisions.

HISTORY

Founded in 1990 in Arcade, NY by Daniel Volk, National Yo-Yo Day celebrates the yo-yo on June 6, the date of Donald F. Duncan’s birth in 1892.

Volk once worked for Duncan Toy Company as a talented yo-yo demonstrator from 1976-1978, touring the western part of the United States. As a result, Volk had the opportunity to impart some of his yoyoing wisdom to two talented comedians.

The Smothers Brothers later produced The Yo-Yo Man Instructional Video. Mr. Volk demonstrates right along with the comedians in the video. In conjunction with National Yo-Yo Day, the Hummingbird Toy Company produced the first of several Smothers Brothers brand yo-yos.

In conjunction with National Yo-Yo Day, the Hummingbird Toy Company produced the first of several Smothers Brothers brand yo-yos.

Buy your children a yo-yo and one for yourself. Learn how to do some tricks together.

 

To observe National Chocolate Ice Cream Day on June 7th all you need is chocolate ice cream. Who says you have to stop there, though? You can have it in a cone or make it from scratch. Add sprinkles or syrup or whipped cream.
Chocolate ice cream is the second most common flavor, surpassed only by vanilla. The chocolate flavored ice cream has been in existence well over a hundred years and has been popular in the United States since the late 19th century.

Cocoa powder is blended in with eggs, cream, vanilla and sugar to make chocolate ice cream. The cocoa powder is what gives the ice cream a brown color. Other flavors, such as rocky road or triple chocolate chunk, use chocolate ice cream in their creation.

Have an ice cream social at home. Use chocolate ice cream and a bunch of different toppings. Have the children make their own sundaes.
Each year on June 8th, National Upsy Daisy Day is set aside to encourage you to face the day positively and to get up ‘gloriously, gratefully and gleefully’ each morning.

Every day is a gift and if we remember that as we rise each morning, it will help us carry a good attitude throughout the day, whatever the day may bring us. Life is full of challenges and bumps in the road, and it is our attitude that helps us over the bumps and through the challenges to move onward with a smile. This is a great day to teach our children these lessons.
Give it a try. Be grateful and thankful for what you do have such as a bed to sleep in, food to eat, friends and family. Try a smile and see how it feels. It may surprise you that it feels good on the inside also and how other people will smile back. You may just brighten up their day! Upsy Daisy!

HISTORY

National Upsy Daisy Day was created by Stephanie West Allen is 2003. Her desire in creating National Upsy Daisy Day was to make humor, laughter and a positive attitude part of the Upsy Daisy Day way.

National Donald Duck Day is observed annually on June 9th. This day commemorates the birthday of the funny animal cartoon character, Donald Duck. Donald made his first screen debut on June 9, 1934, in The Wise Little Hen.

Donald Duck usually wears a sailor suit with a cap and a black or red bow tie and is most famous for his semi-intelligible speech along with his mischievous and irritable personality.

Donald Duck has appeared in more films than any other Disney character. Donald was also declared in 2002 by TV Guide as one of the 50 greatest cartoon characters of all times.

It was in Donald’s second appearance in Orphan’s Benefit that he was introduced to his comic friend, Mickey Mouse. Donald’s girlfriend, Daisy Duck, along with his nephews, Huey, Dewey, and Louie, were introduced shortly after that.

In addition to animation, Donald is also known for his appearance in comic books and newspaper comic strips.

One of Donald Duck’s famous sayings is “Oh boy, oh boy, oh boy.”

Get the kids togehter and watch some old Donald Duck cartoons.

 

National Iced Tea Day is observed annually on June 10th. This day is set aside to celebrate one of the summer’s favorite drinks. Whether it is sweetened or unsweetened, with or without lemon, it is loved by many and enjoyed by the glass full all summer long.
Iced tea can be found in many flavors including lemon, peach, raspberry, lime, passions fruit, strawberry, and cherry.

An alternative to carbonated soft drinks and quite popular in the United States, iced tea makes up about 85% of all tea consumed. It can be readily found in restaurants, convenience stores, vending machines, grocery stores and self-serve soda fountains.
Recipes for iced tea have been found dating back to the 1870s. The Buckeye Cookbook, published in 1876 and Housekeeping in Old Virginia, published in 1877 both contain iced tea recipes.

It is believed, however, that iced tea started to appear in the United States in the 1860’s and became widespread in the 1870s where it was found offered on hotel menus and was on sale at railroad stations.

The popularity of refreshing iced tea drink grew rapidly after it was introduced at the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis.

Green tea has been suggested to be used for a variety of positive health benefits.

-Reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease
-Some forms of cancer
-Oral health
-Reduce blood pressure
-Weight control
-Antibacterial and antiviral activity
-Protection from solar ultraviolet light
-Anti-fibrotic properties
-Neuroprotective power

Teach your children how to brew and enjoy a pitcher of iced tea. Experiment with different flavors… like lemon, lime, peach, or raspberry.

 

National Making Life Beautiful Day is observed annually on June 11th. It is a day dedicated to encouraging and celebrating men and women who are making life beautiful. Whether you’re creating beauty through building relationships or helping others achieve personal success, one small action can lead to a ripple effect, making life beautiful not just for yourself, but for those around you, too.
Making Life Beautiful Day was submitted by Apriori Beauty and declared by the Registrar of National Day Calendar in April 2015. The date was chosen because Apriori Beauty launched their mission to help men and women look and feel beautiful with their availability of their internal and external approach to beauty on June 11, 2009.

Take this chance to teach your children a valuable lesson about being nice to others. Help someone you know to achieve a personal goal, donate time to a worthy cause, help someone less fortunate or just do something nice for someone.

 

The second Sunday in June (this year June 11th) is known as National Children’s Day in the United States.

A day to honor the children in our lives, National Children’s Day is a time to slow down our fast paced lives, turn off the tech and refocus on the important things.

Taking one day may not be enough, but using it as an opportunity to redirect our family’s lives may be an important step in a child’s life.
Cherish our children, spend time with them.

HISTORY

Reverend Dr. Charles Leonard of the Universalist Church of the Redeemer in Chelsea, Massachusetts started Children’s Day in 1856 as a special day to Baptize children. He originally named it Rose Day. In 1995, President Clinton proclaimed National Children’s Day as October 8th. He was later followed by President Bush in 2001 who declared the first Sunday in June as National Child’s Day. However, National Children’s Day is generally celebrated the second Sunday in June or October 8th.

Celebrate this day in any way you choose. Take your child to their favorite restaurant or let them have some special treat for dessert. Anything they want 🙂

Peanut butter cookie lovers across the United States annually observe National Peanut Butter Cookie Day on June 12.

Alabama’s American agricultural extension educator, George Washington Carver, was the most well-known promoter of the peanut. Carver compiled 105 peanut recipes from various cookbooks, agricultural bulletins, and other sources.  In 1916, he put together a Research Bulletin called How to Grow the Peanut and 105 Ways of Preparing it for Human Consumption. Included in this Research Bulletin were three recipes for peanut cookies calling for crushed or chopped peanuts as one of its ingredients.

“It was in the early 1920s that peanut butter was found listed as an ingredient in cookies.”

Homemade peanut butter cookies would just not be right without the traditional forked crisscrosses on them!

Make a few batches of yummy PB Cookies with your children. Let them get their hands a little dirty in the mix.

National Weed Your Garden Day is observed annually on June 13th. This day is set aside for all gardeners to take an extra 5 or 10 minutes while weeding their gardens.

One of the best gardening tips is to stay in control of your garden. Weeds grow fast, very fast, and can soon become overwhelming. If you stay on top of them, it is much easier to maintain your garden. Weeding 5 or 10 minutes each day will make the job seem bearable. It might even be enjoyable. This way you will be in control, and the weeds will not!!

Excessive and unwanted weeds will crowd out plant roots and steal the nutrients that are needed for the plants to grow nice and healthy.

Get the kids involved and make a game of it. Whoever pulls the most weeds in the quickest time without making a big mess, gets a prize.

Helpful tips on reducing weeds in your garden:

-Cover the soil along rows and between plants with mulch.
-Make sure to keep all weeds away from young plants.
-It is okay to plant your plants closely together to leave less room for weed growth.
-Have soil weed-free before planting.
-Make sure you do not let any of the weeds go to seed.
-Keep the edges of your yard mowed low to lessen the invasion of weeds onto your property and into your garden.

 

June 14th is set aside to observe National Pop Goes the Weasel Day. On this day people dig back into their memories to the nursery rhymes, they learned as children and celebrate the day singing “Pop Goes the Weasel.”

The origins of this nursery rhyme are believed to date back to the 1700s.

The original version went as such:
Half a pound of tuppenny rice,
Half a pound of treacle.
That’s the way the money goes,
Pop! goes the weasel.
Up and down the City road,
In and out the Eagle,
That’s the way the money goes,
Pop! goes the weasel.

“The Eagle” in the second verse may refer to The Eagle freehold pub which was once at the corner of Shepherdess Walk and City Road in London. Its second life, in 1825, was as a music house. Then in 1901 it was demolished and rebuilt once more into a public house. It bears a plaque with this version of “Pop Goes the Weasel” along with the history of the pub.

An alternative version:

A penny for a spool of thread,
A penny for a needle.
That’s the way the money goes,
Pop! goes the weasel.

This version is interpreted as the “weasel” being a shuttle or bobbin, as used by silk weavers, being pawned in a similar way as the suits or jackets owned by the Cockneys.

There are many different versions of this nursery rhyme, and they are all fun, with the same catchy tune.

Have your children come up with their own “weasel” rhymes 🙂

 

June 15th is the day we observe National Smile Power Day. This is a day for everyone to share the power of the smile.

From the good morning greeting and the first “How may I help you?” present yourself with a smile. No matter where you are employed, job seeking, retired or looking for new horizons starting the day with a smile is certainly more empowering than a pout or grump. Starting with a smile first is easier than trying to get there later in the day.

Starting with a smile first is easier than trying to get there later in the day.
When you smile at someone, you are telling them that they are valued and worth the smile that you just gave them. Smiles are moral boosters and confidence builders.

Research has proven that smiling really does increase attractiveness and likability between humans. Smiling creates a greater trust and increased interpersonal cooperation. Smiling at someone can help them to relax and relieve their stress while at the same time, it will make you feel right. Smiling (even if you do not feel like it) will lift your mood and can make you a happier person.

Smiling at someone can help them to relax and relieve their stress while at the same time, it will make you feel right. Smiling (even if you do not feel like it) will lift your mood and can make you a happier person.
Challenge yourself to smile more often today. Use a smile to disarm a tense situation, or simply smile during your daily tasks.
Each year on the third Friday in June (this year June 16th), it is National Flip Flop Day! Find your flip flops and wear them!
In 2007, Tropical Smoothie Cafe created National Flip Flop Day to celebrate its 10th anniversary. Every year on this date, customers who come into participating Cafes across the nation wearing flip-flops receive a free Jetty Punch Smoothie. Tropical Smoothie then gives proceeds of a $1 paper flip flop from customers to send ill children and their families to Camp Sunshine.

Camp Sunshine is based in Casco, Maine, and their mission is focused solely on addressing the effects of a life-threatening illness on every member of the immediate family — the child, the parents and the siblings. This year-round program is free of charge to families.

In 2015, $1 million was raised by Tropical Smoothie Cafe for Camp Sunshine. The total amount raised since the beginning in 2007 is over $3.7 million making National Flip Flop Day a successful fundraiser for Camp Sunshine.
National Eat Your Vegetables Day is observed annually on June 17th. June is National Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Month, and National Eat Your Vegetables Day is one more opportunity to remind everyone to continue with this part of a healthy diet.

Vegetables are an essential part of a healthy lifestyle.

As part of the main meal or as a snack, vegetables can be enjoyed in a variety of ways. Each vegetable has its own nutritional content though generally, they contain a little protein or fat and varying proportions of vitamins such as Vitamin A, Vitamin K and Vitamin B6, provitamins, dietary minerals and carbohydrates. They also contain a variety of other phytochemicals, some of which have antioxidant, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and anticarcinogenic properties. Many vegetables also contain fiber which is important for gastrointestinal function. Another benefit is the essential nutrients that vegetables contain that are necessary for healthy hair and skin.

They also contain a variety of other phytochemicals, some of which have antioxidant, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and anticarcinogenic properties. Many vegetables also contain fiber which is important for gastrointestinal function. Another benefit is the essential nutrients that vegetables contain that are necessary for healthy hair and skin.

When eating a diet consisting of the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables, it may help lower the risk of heart diseases and type 2 diabetes. These diets may also help to decrease bone loss and protect against some cancers. The potassium provided may help prevent the formation of kidney stones.

These diets may also help to decrease bone loss and protect against some cancers. The potassium provided may help prevent the formation of kidney stones.

It is recommended by the USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans, to consume 3 to 5 servings of vegetables per day. This recommendation may vary, however, depending on age and gender. For most vegetables, one serving is equivalent to 1/2 to 1 cup and can be eaten either raw or cooked.

This recommendation may vary, however, depending on age and gender. For most vegetables, one serving is equivalent to 1/2 to 1 cup and can be eaten either raw or cooked.

Make sure you consume your recommended daily allowance of vegetables as an example to your children. We all know how difficult it can be to get them to eat.

 

Father’s Day is observed annually on the third Sunday in June. This day (June 18th) is set aside to honor the role that fathers play in the family structure and society.

After the success of Mother’s Day, Father’s Day observations began to appear. The road to this national observance was not easy.

The first recorded celebration of Father’s Day happened after the Monograph Mining Disaster, which killed 361 men and left around 1,000 children fatherless in December 1907. Grace Golden Clayton suggested to her pastor Robert Thomas Webb a day honoring all those fathers. On July 5th, 1908, a gathering in honor of these men took place at Williams Memorial Methodist Episcopal Church South, now known as Central United Methodist Church, in Fairmont, West Virginia.

On July 5th, 1908, a gathering in honor of these men took place at Williams Memorial Methodist Episcopal Church South, now known as Central United Methodist Church, in Fairmont, West Virginia.

Grace Golden Clayton suggested to her pastor Robert Thomas Webb a day honoring all those fathers. On July 5th, 1908, a gathering in honor of these men took place at Williams Memorial Methodist Episcopal Church South, now known as Central United Methodist Church, in Fairmont, West Virginia.
In 1910, the YMCA in Spokane, Washington recruited several clergymen with the help of Sonora Smart Dodd to honor fathers throughout the city. The date was set for June 5th but was later changed to June 19th (the 3rd Sunday in June) as many of the clergies needed more time to prepare.
Harry C. Meek, a member of Lions Clubs International, claimed that he first had the idea for Father’s Day in 1915. Meek argued that the third Sunday of June was chosen because it was his birthday. The Lions Club has named him “Originator of Father’s Day.” Meek made many efforts to promote Father’s Day and make it an official holiday.

The Lions Club has named him “Originator of Father’s Day.” Meek made many efforts to promote Father’s Day and make it an official holiday.
After a visit to Spokane in 1916 to speak at a Father’s Day celebration, President Woodrow Wilson wanted to make it official, but Congress resisted fearing that the observation would become too commercialized.

President Calvin Coolidge stopped short of issuing a national proclamation in 1924.
Sonora Smart Dodd continued to work to make Father’s Day a national observation. In 1938, she collaborated with the Father’s Day Council, a group of New York Men’s Wear Retailers for the commercial promotion of the observation. Many Americans resisted the holiday for decades because of these attempts to commercialize the day.

In 1938, she collaborated with the Father’s Day Council, a group of New York Men’s Wear Retailers for the commercial promotion of the observation. Many Americans resisted the holiday for decades because of these attempts to commercialize the day.
In 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson issued the first presidential proclamation honoring fathers on the third Sunday in June.
President Richard Nixon signed into law a permanent national holiday in 1972 over 50 years after Mother’s Day came into existence.
Father’s Day is now celebrated in many countries around the world.

This one is self-explanatory. Treat dad to a nice day with the kids.
This is one just for the parents to take a nice break from the kids…

On June 19th, shake up some gin and vermouth with some ice and add a lemon twist. It’s National Martini Day!

This adult beverage has grown to become one of the best-known mixed alcoholic drinks. A cocktail made with gin and vermouth, the martini is normally garnished with an olive or lemon twist.

James Bond, the fictional spy, sometimes asked for his vodka martinis to be “shaken, not stirred.”
Some people prefer to have their martinis served “on the rocks”, which is the ingredients poured over ice cubes and served in an old-fashioned glass.

Dirty martini – Martini with a splash of olive brine or olive juice and is typically garnished with an olive.
Over the years, the traditional martini has had a number of variations added to it and other flavors have evolved such as the cosmopolitan, chocolatini or appletini.
Mix your favorite martini and drink responsibly.
National Vanilla Milkshake Day is happily enjoyed by many people on June 20th of each year. You can celebrate this day by making a homemade vanilla milkshake for you and your family today.

The first time the term “milkshake” was used in print was in 1885. This milkshake was a concoction of cream, eggs, and whiskey which was often served with other alcoholic tonics such as lemonades and soda waters.
By 1900, a milkshake was often referred to as “wholesome drinks made with chocolate, strawberry or vanilla syrups.” A few years later in the early 1900s, people began asking for this new treat with a scoop of ice cream. It was then by the 1930s that milkshakes were a popular drink in malt shops everywhere.

Maybe you want to top off your vanilla milkshake with a little whipped cream and a cherry on top!!

Give these delicious recipes a try:

Vanilla Milkshake by Paula Deen – Food Network

Creamy Vanilla Milkshake

 

National Daylight Appreciation Day is observed each year on June 21st. This day recognizes summer solstice (the longest day of daylight in the northern hemisphere) and encourages people to celebrate the many benefits of the sun.

This day recognizes summer solstice (the longest day of daylight in the northern hemisphere) and encourages people to celebrate the many benefits of the sun.
National Daylight Appreciation Day is also a day to learn more about the importance of daylighting. Daylighting is using skylights, windows and other architectural openings to natural light interior spaces. Doing so helps not only to reduce energy consumption but may also have health benefits.

Daylighting is using skylights, windows and other architectural openings to natural light interior spaces. Doing so helps not only to reduce energy consumption but may also have health benefits.

Some areas are designed with automatic dimming systems when natural light is present, which reduces the amount of artificial light required. The process is known as daylight harvesting.

Daylight has positive psychological effects; it can boost your mental health and help to lower depression as well as help with increased energy levels. The Vitamin D that we naturally get from the sun has many health benefits for us.

Enjoy the summer solstice, enjoy the sunshine and let the sunshine into your home!

HISTORY

National Daylight Appreciation Day is sponsored by Solatube International, Inc., a manufacturer of Tubular Daylighting Devices.

 

June 22nd recognizes a batter dipped and deep fried bite of deliciousness that runs rings around other appetizers. It’s National Onion Rings Day!

Also found in Canada, United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia and some parts of Asia, onion rings exact origin are unknown.

A recipe called “Fried Onions with Parmesan Cheese” is included in John Mollard’s 1802 cookbook The Art of Cookery Made Easy and Refined. Within the recipe, it suggests cutting onions into 1/2 inch rings, dipping them into a batter made of flour, cream, salt, pepper and Parmesan cheese then deep frying them in boiling lard. It recommends serving them with a sauce made of melted butter and mustard.

Within the recipe, it suggests cutting onions into 1/2 inch rings, dipping them into a batter made of flour, cream, salt, pepper and Parmesan cheese then deep frying them in boiling lard. It recommends serving them with a sauce made of melted butter and mustard.
Some believe that a recipe for French Fried Onions (not claiming to be the originator of the recipe) appeared in the Middletown, NY Daily Times on January 13, 1910.
The Pig Stand restaurant chain, founded in Oak Cliff, Texas in the early 1920s is one of the claimants to the onion rings invention.
A recipe for deep-fried onion rings that are dipped in milk then dredged in flour appeared in a 1933 Crisco advertisement in The New York Times Magazine.
In the 1960’s, the A&W restaurant is credited with popularizing the onion rings in fast food restaurants.
June 22nd recognizes a batter dipped and deep fried bite of deliciousness that runs rings around other appetizers. It’s National Onion Rings Day!

Also found in Canada, United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia and some parts of Asia, onion rings exact origin are unknown.

A recipe called “Fried Onions with Parmesan Cheese” is included in John Mollard’s 1802 cookbook The Art of Cookery Made Easy and Refined. Within the recipe, it suggests cutting onions into 1/2 inch rings, dipping them into a batter made of flour, cream, salt, pepper and Parmesan cheese then deep frying them in boiling lard. It recommends serving them with a sauce made of melted butter and mustard.
Some believe that a recipe for French Fried Onions (not claiming to be the originator of the recipe) appeared in the Middletown, NY Daily Times on January 13, 1910.
The Pig Stand restaurant chain, founded in Oak Cliff, Texas in the early 1920s is one of the claimants to the onion rings invention.
A recipe for deep-fried onion rings that are dipped in milk then dredged in flour appeared in a 1933 Crisco advertisement in The New York Times Magazine.
In the 1960’s, the A&W restaurant is credited with popularizing the onion rings in fast food restaurants.

 

The games get intense under the hot summer sun. On June 23rd, National Hydration Day reminds us to replace fluids lost in the heat of battle.

The human body contains more than 60 percent water. Maintaining that balance while training is a challenge, doing it during the summer months is a practice that must be consistent. Becoming overheated or dehydrated can lead to heat stroke and possibly death.
There are ways to help prevent dehydration. Being hydrated before a workout even begins is important. If you are under hydrated before you start it is hard to catch up once the sweating starts. Drink plenty of fluids throughout the training. These can include sports drinks which contain electrolytes (Magnesium, Calcium, Sodium and Potassium) to replenish the essential minerals the body loses through perspiration.

For some sports, there is also a product like FuelGard™ Mouthgard and Electrolyte Tablets, which has the dual duty of protecting the athlete as well as providing essential electrolytes for maintaining hydration balance while the athlete trains.

After the workout, your body will continue to need to replenish fluids.
Whether you are an athlete or not, stay hydrated on these hot summer days. Use #NationalHydrationDay to share on social media.

HISTORY

Founded by SafeTGard Corporation in honor of football Coach Victor Hawkins (September 1, 1964 – June 23, 2012) who invented a mouthguard that releases electrolytes to keep his players hydrated during games and practices. This day honors Coach Hawkins’ contributions to athlete health, safety and success. SafeTGard Corporation founded National Hydration Day to increase awareness of the importance of proper hydration to athletes everywhere. The day was approved by the Registrar at National Day Calendar in 2016.

SafeTGard Corporation founded National Hydration Day to increase awareness of the importance of proper hydration to athletes everywhere. The day was approved by the Registrar at National Day Calendar in 2016.

 

National Pralines Day is observed annually on June 24th. This day honors the praline, a confection made from nuts (whether in whole pieces or ground) and sugar syrup. Pralines may also refer to any chocolate cookie containing the ground powder of nuts.

There are a variety of pralines to be enjoyed:

Belgian Pralines – contain a hard chocolate shell with a softer, sometimes liquid, filling.
French Pralines – a combination of almonds and caramelized sugar.
American Pralines – contain milk or cream and are softer and creamier, resembling fudge.
At the Chateau of Vaux-le-Vicomte during the 17th century, French sugar industrialist, Marshal du Plessis-Praslin (1598-1675), originally inspired the early pralines. These first pralines were whole almonds, individually coated in caramelized sugar.

The powder made by grinding up sugar-coated nuts is called pralin. This is an ingredient in many types of cake, pastries and ice creams. When this powder is mixed with chocolate, it becomes praliné in French, which gave birth to what is known in French as Chocolat praliné.
The French settlers brought their recipe into Louisiana, an area of the United States where both sugar cane and pecan trees were plentiful. During the 19th century, New Orleans chefs substituted pecans for almonds, added cream to thicken the confection and thus created what is known throughout the Southern United States as the praline.

Create your own batch with this recipe for pralines. We enjoy this Louisiana tradition so much we found another recipe for pralines for you to celebrate. Of course, you can stop by your favorite confectionery and enjoy a few with friends and family.
National Strawberry Parfait Day is observed annually on June 25th.

Parfait is French for perfect. The traditional parfait is a dessert of ice cream or frozen custard layered in a tall glass stemmed glass with fruit and topped with whipped cream.

Today, the ice cream is often replaced with yogurt or pudding and additional layers of granola are added. Strawberries are in season during the month of June, so it is a good time for National Strawberry Parfait Day.

Strawberries are in season during the month of June, so it is a good time for National Strawberry Parfait Day.
Enjoy one at your favorite restaurant or a one you make at home! You will enjoy this Strawberry Parfait recipe.
The food holiday National Chocolate Pudding Day is observed each year on June 26th. Chocolate pudding has been loved by children and adults for many years. Usually eaten as a snack or dessert, chocolate pudding is also used as a filling for a chocolate creme pie.

Historically, chocolate pudding is a variation of chocolate custard, using starch as a thickener instead of eggs. The 1903 edition of Mary Harris Frazer’s Kentucky Receipt Book and the 1918 edition of Fannie Farmer’s Boston Cooking School Cook Book both have recipes for the earlier version, using both eggs and flour.

The 1903 edition of Mary Harris Frazer’s Kentucky Receipt Book and the 1918 edition of Fannie Farmer’s Boston Cooking School Cook Book both have recipes for the earlier version, using both eggs and flour.

In 1934, General Foods (Jello) introduced chocolate pudding mix as “Walter Baker’s Dessert.”
In 1936, it was renamed “Pickle’s Pudding.”
Chocolate pudding is usually made with milk and sugar, flavored with chocolate and vanilla then thickened with flour or cornstarch. Some recipes do use eggs when making the pudding.

Chocolate pudding can be purchased ready-made and sold in grocery stores, convenience stores, and gas stations. The popular brands include Jell-O by the Kraft Foods Corporation and Snack Pack by Hunt’s.

Enjoy some delicious Chocolate Pudding as a dessert or as a snack. Try this homemade Chocolate Cornstarch Pudding recipe.

 

Celebrated each year on June 27th, National Sunglasses Day is becoming more and more popular, especially as organizations like The Vision Council try to inform people about the dangers of UV exposure and why wearing sunglasses should be more than to just make a fashion statement. So in honor of the holiday—and to help you pick out a pair of your own—we present the top 10 sunglasses styles that have stood the test of time.
Most known for their appearance in the 1963 Academy Award-winning Italian film 8 ½, these glasses are anything but old fashioned. They were first introduced by Prada as Prada model SPR07F, but the design has undergone some changes since the 60’s.Regardless, these sunglasses might be one of the only designs that can not only be worn with a suit, but that make a suit look so good.

They were first introduced by Prada as Prada model SPR07F, but the design has undergone some changes since the 60’s.Regardless, these sunglasses might be one of the only designs that can not only be worn with a suit, but that make a suit look so good.

For National Sunglasses Day this year, decide which of the personalities or looks you’d like to emulate and grab a pair of sunglasses to match.

 

On June 28th we remember fondly the tales of big blue ox and a mighty lumberjack. It is National Paul Bunyan Day!

Described as a giant and a lumberjack of unusual skill, Paul Bunyan is one of the most famous North American folklore heroes. In the tales, Paul Bunyan was almost always accompanied by his companion, Babe the Blue Ox.
First appearing in print in 1906, in a story published by Northern Michigan journalist James MacGillivray, Bunyan’s character originated in folktales circulated among lumberjacks in the Northeastern United States and Eastern Canada. One account states that the tales began during the Papineau Rebellion of 1837. In 1914, the stories were reworked by William Laughead, for a logging company’s advertising campaign, and found a new widespread popularity. It was the 1922 edition of Laughead’s tales that inspired many others and soon the character was widely known across all of the United States and Canada.

In 1914, the stories were reworked by William Laughead, for a logging company’s advertising campaign, and found a new widespread popularity. It was the 1922 edition of Laughead’s tales that inspired many others and soon the character was widely known across all of the United States and Canada.
The Paul Bunyan legend tells that it took five storks to carry him as a newborn and as he was a little older and clapped and laughed, it broke windows. The legend continues that he sawed off the legs of his parents’ bed, in the middle of the night, when he was only seven months old and that the Grand Canyon was formed as he and Babe the Blue Ox walked through dragging his ax behind him. The myth of the Great Lakes being formed by Bunyan needing to create a watering hole for Babe to drink from is another popular one told by many.

The legend continues that he sawed off the legs of his parents’ bed, in the middle of the night, when he was only seven months old and that the Grand Canyon was formed as he and Babe the Blue Ox walked through dragging his ax behind him. The myth of the Great Lakes being formed by Bunyan needing to create a watering hole for Babe to drink from is another popular one told by many.

The myth of the Great Lakes being formed by Bunyan needing to create a watering hole for Babe to drink from is another popular one told by many.

Read the story Paul Bunyan and Babe the Blue Ox to the kids.

Enjoy a summertime favorite on June 29th, It’s National Bomb Pop Day! Invented in 1955 in Kansas City, Missouri, Bomb Pops are known to people as the red, white and blue Popsicle. Having one of these frozen treats is a great way to kick off the upcoming 4th of July celebrations in your community!

Invented in 1955 in Kansas City, Missouri, Bomb Pops are known to people as the red, white and blue Popsicle. Having one of these frozen treats is a great way to kick off the upcoming 4th of July celebrations in your community!

Enjoy some cool bomb pops with the family on these hot days.

National Meteor Watch Day is observed every year on June 30th. Also known as National Meteor Day, on a cloudless night, people turn their eyes to the heavens in hopes of spotting the glow of a falling star.

Daily there are millions of meteors that occur in the Earth’s atmosphere.

When space debris, such as pieces of rock, enter the earth’s atmosphere the friction causes the surrounding air to become scorching hot. This “shooting star” streaking through the sky surrounded by flaming hot air is a meteor.

The majority of the meteoroids that cause meteors are only the size of a pebble.

Meteors sometimes occur in showers. National Meteor Watch Day is an excellent time to plan for a meteor watching party. Whether it is to catch a few stray falling stars or to watch an entire meteor shower, gathering the kids or a few friends to map the constellations while waiting to make a wish or two is sure to be a fun time.

Whether it is to catch a few stray falling stars or to watch an entire meteor shower, gathering the kids or a few friends to map the constellations while waiting to make a wish or two is sure to be a fun time.

In the Northern Hemisphere, one of the most active meteor showers is the Perseids. Named after the constellation Perseus where the majority of the activity takes place, the meteors are caused by particles released by the comet 109P/Swift-Tuttle. Active from mid-July to late August, the Perseids are known to put on a dazzling display at its peak, especially when the skies are clear and the moon is new.

Active from mid-July to late August, the Perseids are known to put on a dazzling display at its peak, especially when the skies are clear and the moon is new.

Meteors are usually observed at night and are visible when they are about 34 to 70 miles above the Earth, and they often disintegrated at about 31 to 51 miles above. Their glow time is usually about a second.

A small percent of meteoroids hit the Earth’s atmosphere and then skip back into space.

The chemical composition and the speed of the meteoroid will cause different hues to the light. Possible colors and elements producing them include:

Orange/yellow (sodium)
Yellow (iron)
Blue/green (copper)
Purple (potassium)
Red (silicate)
A list of meteor shower dates as well as a guide to successful watching can be found on the EarthSky website.

Plan your night. Gather some friends together, a blanket and find a place far from the city lights on a cloudless night.

June is a great month to get outside and have some fun with the family!!!

Let me know if you plan to celebrate any of these days 🙂

I hope you have a wonderful summer!

 

Hello, my name is Kristen Osborne I am a happy mother of one beautiful little girl. Very into the internet and trying out new things.

Days in May to Celebrate with the Kids

“To be in your children’s memories tomorrow, you have to be in their lives today”

The weather is getting warm, the kids are getting antsy to be outside. But, what can you do as a family that everyone can enjoy together.

May is the best time of year, in my opinion. It gets warmer outside but not hot, the flowers are blooming, and everyone seems to be in a good mood.

As with March and April, I have looked up the different national days for the month of May and chosen the ones that I think would be nice to celebrate as a family.

So, without further ado I give you… kids celebrate May

National Days of May to Celebrate with the Kids

National Mother Goose Day is observed each year on May 1st.

This day honors Mother Goose, the imaginary author of a collection of fairy tales and nursery rhymes we loved as children.

Mother Goose is often illustrated as an elderly country woman in a tall hat and shawl, but she is also sometimes depicted as a goose wearing a bonnet.

Enjoy two different versions of Peter, Peter, Pumpkin Eater:

(Originally dated in Mother Goose’s Quarto c1825)

Peter, Peter, pumpkin eater,
Had another, and didn’t love her;
Peter learned to read and spell,
And then he loved her very well.

(Most well-known version)

Peter, Peter, pumpkin eater,
Had a wife and couldn’t keep her;
He put her in a pumpkin shell
And there he keeps her very well.

What to do:

In honor of Mother Goose Day, revisit those wonderful childhood stories with your children.

HISTORY

Charles Perrault is believed to be the initiator of the fairy tale genre when he published his fairy tale collection in 1695.

His publication marks the first authenticated starting point for the Mother Goose stories.

Mother Goose Day was founded in 1987 by Gloria T. Delamar in tandem with the publication of her book, Mother Goose; From Nursery to Literature. For more information on National Mother Goose Day visit The Official Home of the Mother Goose Society.

National Truffle Day is observed annually on May 2nd.  On this day, the deliciously sweet chocolate truffle gets the spotlight.

This chocolate confectionery is traditionally made with a chocolate ganache center coated in chocolate, icing, cocoa powder, chopped nuts or coconut.

The truffle may be filled with other fillings such as cream, melted chocolate, caramel, nuts, fruit, nougat, fudge, toffee, mint, marshmallow or liqueur.

N. Petruccelli of Chambery, France is believed to be the inventor of the chocolate truffle in December 1895.

Truffles became much more popular in 1902 when Prestat Chocolate Shop opened in London.

What to do:

Enjoy the following tried and true recipes.

Easy OREO Truffles
Easy Decadent Truffles
Basic Truffles
Chocolate Truffles

Each year on May 3 it is National Two Different Colored Shoes Day.

This is a day to stand out from the other 364 days of the year. Celebrate your uniqueness and put it on display on May 3rd.

Wear two different colored shoes and see where they take you.

What to do:

Encourage the kids to wear two different colored shoes for a fun silly day.

HISTORY

National Two Different Colored Shoes Day was created by Dr. Arlene Kaiser.  Kaiser created this day to recognize and celebrate human diversity.

According to Kaiser, “The simple act of wearing two different colored shoes proclaims your individuality.

By taking this ‘positive risk,’ you can demonstrate your willingness to be different, and show your appreciation for the unique people in your life”.

To learn more visit

www.nationaltwodifferentcolordedshoesday.com.

May 4 recognizes National Orange Juice Day, America’s most popular breakfast drink.

People have been waking up to a glass of orange juice for many years and enjoying the health benefits it gives them.

One 8 ounce serving of orange juice has 124 mg of vitamin C and also supplies potassium, thiamine and folate.

That little bit of sunshine in the morning can add a boost to your day.

Another excellent way to add orange juice to your diet if you are watching your sugar intake is to include it as an ingredient in a recipe.

Orange juice can add great flavor to smoothies, whole grain waffles or french toast.

National Space Day is observed annually on the first Friday in May.

This day is dedicated to the extraordinary achievements, benefits and opportunities in the exploration and use of space.

The goal of National Space Day is to promote math, science, technology and engineering education in young people to inspire them to pursue a career in science, especially a career in space-related jobs.

What to do:

Teachers, students, space-related organizations, groups and agencies hold celebrations, demonstrations and educational programs each year on National Space Day.

National Space Day has grown so fast in recent years; the day is celebrated worldwide as International Space Day.

HISTORY

National Space Day was created in 1997 by the Lockheed Martin Corporation as a one-day event.  In 2001, due to its extreme popularity, former astronaut and Senator John Glenn expanded Space Day to International Space Day.

Each year on the first Saturday in May, National Scrapbook Day is observed.

Also known as National Scrapbooking Day, this day will gather thousands of people all over the country to celebrate with scrapbooking parties and share their talents with others. Scrapbooking dates back to the 15th century.

Scrapbooking is a method for preserving family history, personal momentoes, photographs, newspaper clippings, artwork and other memorabilia.

Journaling is often included to describe the journey or to maintain the story for future generations.

Scrapbooking has become a popular hobby and those who enjoy it may develop a strong social network, swapping tools, advice and techniques.

They often gather together at each others’ homes and even join each other at conventions or retreats.

NATIONAL LEMONADE DAY

National Lemonade Day is observed the first Sunday in May.

Not only is National Lemonade Day a time to enjoy a refreshing glass of lemonade, but more importantly, it is a day to give youth an opportunity to experience the taste of success.

Through LemonadeDay.org, millions of kids around the nation learn what it takes to run a business in a fun and constructive way.

The days leading up to Lemonade Day are full of preparation by small but budding entrepreneurs.

They attend workshops, check their stock and scout out their locations.

On Lemonade Day, they will be ready to set up shop and sell the freshest, coolest lemonade their side of the block!

What to do:

To participate in National Lemonade Day visit www.lemonadeday.org. Help the kids make a  lemonade stand on National Lemonade Day.

History:

National Lemonade Day was founded by Michael Holthouse in 2007 in his hometown of Houston, Texas. Today he and LemonadeDay.org is partnered with Google to continue to bring the entrepreneur spirit to the youth of the America.

 

National Coconut Cream Pie Day is observed annually on May 8. This day was created in honor of the delicious pie made with a sweet coconut cream filling.

What to do:

Follow a tried and true recipe for homemade Old Fashioned Coconut Cream Pie

National Teacher Appreciation Day, also known as National Teacher Day, is observed on the Tuesday of the first full week in May. This day is part of Teacher Appreciation Week, which is the first full week in May of each year.

The National Education Association describes National Teacher Day

Teachers play a critical role in educating and shaping our children: the future leaders of our country.

They are kind, patient, hard-working, dedicated and understanding professionals that mold our children’s lives in a positive direction.

We entrust our children with the teachers, and they affect their lives on a daily basis.

What to do:

It is time to say Thank You to the special teachers that you know.  Let them know that they are appreciated for all that they do.

HISTORY

Political and educational leaders first began discussions for a day to honor teachers in 1944.  In 1953, Eleanor Roosevelt persuaded the 81st Congress to proclaim National Teachers’ Day.

Congress declared March 7, 1980, as National Teacher Day. The National Education Association continued to observe Teacher Day on the first Tuesday in March until 1985, when the National PTA established Teacher Appreciation Week as the first full week of May.

The NEA Representative Assembly then voted to make the Tuesday of that week National Teacher Day.

National Clean Up Your Room Day is observed annually on May 10.  This is a day parents appreciate much more than do their children.

National Clean Up Your Room Day isn’t just for kids to clean their rooms.  It is about picking up, straightening up and cleaning up.

It is a day to do some serious spring cleaning and make your surroundings more pleasant.

Clean out a cluttered closet and donate or throw away those things you are not using.

Help your children make their beds, clean their rooms and eliminate the toys and clothing they have outgrown.

What to do:

Spend some time getting your home looking and feeling clean and fresh for summer

but also…

National School Nurse Day is always the Wednesday of National Nurses Week. National School Nurse Day honors all school nurses who care for the children in the schools every day.

School nurses promote learning through healthy children.  The theme for the 2016 National School Nurse Day is School Nurses: Better Health. Better Learning. 

School nurses are often the first place a student thinks to go when they don’t feel well or have been hurt, but they provide a wealth of information that supports a successful education as well.

On National School Nurse Day, remember all the reasons the nurse is available to your school.

HISTORY

On July 4, 1968, the National Education Association established the Department of School Nurses (DSN), an association dedicated to the advancement of school nursing practice and the health of school-age children.

Over the next few years, each state established its own school nurses association under the umbrella of the Department of School Nurses.

In 1974, President Ford proclaimed the fourth Wednesday in January as National School Nurse Day.

School nurses are now nationally recognized and celebrated for contributing to the health and well-being of the nation’s students.

For more information on this day visit the National School Nurse Day website. 

Always observed on May 11, National Twilight Zone Day is that mysterious day highlighted with eerie background music and unexplainable occurrences.

The television show The Twilight Zone was created, written and narrated by Rod Serling. It premiered on October 1, 1959.

The episodes were wildly popular, stretched the imagination, and captivated viewers. The show aired from 1959-1964.

What to do:

What’s your favorite episode of The Twilight Zone? If your children are old enough share this great show with them.

Observed annually on May 12, National Limerick Day celebrates the birthday of English artist, illustrator, author and poet Edward Lear (May 12).

Lear is known mostly for his literary nonsense in poetry, prose and limericks.

National Limerick Day also celebrates the limerick poem.  Limerick poems were popularized by Edward Lear’s book “Book of Nonsense” in 1846.

A limerick is a very short, humorous, nonsense poem. Within a limerick, there are five lines.

The first two lines rhyme with the fifth line and the third and fourth line rhyme together.

The limerick also has a particular rhythm which is officially described as anapestic trimeter.

THERE WAS A YOUNG LADY


By Edward Lear

There was a Young Lady whose chin
Resembled the point of a pin;
So she had it made sharp, and purchased a harp,
And played several tunes with her chin.

What to do:

Sit down with your kids and write a few limericks together.

Annually the second Saturday in May recognizes National Miniature Golf Day.

This day is separate fromMiniature Golf Day, which is celebrated worldwide on September 21.

Similar to the sport of golf, but as the name suggests it is a miniature version of the game. While still played with a series of 9 or 18 holes, miniature golf courses are shorter, usually themed and have a variety of obstacles which add to the difficulty of the game.

There isn’t any need to call “FOUR” since only putters are used in this version.

The distances are too short (usually about 10 yards) to use any of the other clubs in golf.

The courses are made mostly of concrete or artificial turf so there are no divots to replace, either! The game is also known mini-golf, midget golf, putt putt and peewee golf.

Some of the more challenging miniature golf courses have waterfalls, caverns and castles with drawbridges as part of their obstacle course.

What to do:

Take the family to your local miniature golf course and have a fun-filled day!

Everyone has one or has someone who is like a mother to them.

On the second Sunday in May, we honor those women who are our mothers.

Whether we shower her with gifts, take her to a fancy dinner or make her a homemade card, what most moms really want is to be surrounded by the love of their family.

Knowing the people they love are safe, sound and healthy is a mom’s number one priority.

What to do:

Remember to put mom first on Mother’s Day and relax as your children take care of you.

HISTORY

Mother’s Day has been celebrated around the world since, well, since motherhood.

In the United States, Julia Ward Howe inspired the first movement toward a national Mother’s Day during the Civil War.

Appealing to the public for a “Mother’s Day for Peace” after witnessing the devastation left by war, Howe went on an international crusade.

While her efforts never gained formal recognition for an official observance, she was acknowledged posthumously in 1988 for her achievements and her efforts for women’s rights.

It was in 1905 when Mother’s Day was finally introduced successfully by Anna Jarvis, the daughter of Ann Marie Reeves Jarvis who had followed Howe’s campaign and had pursued her own volunteer efforts during the Civil War.

Her mother died May 9, 1905, and she missed her greatly. She started a dedicated letter writing campaign to declare an official Mother’s Day. Through Andrews Methodist Church in Grafton, West Virginia, the first Mother’s Day was observed on May 10, 1908.

This day, to honor Anna Jarvis’s mother grew into a National Observance until in 1911 every state participated.

Soon it was spreading internationally and on May 9, 1914, President Woodrow Wilson proclaimed Mother’s Day a national holiday to be held on the second Sunday of May.

On May 15th, we recognize a morsel of a thing.  It’s National Chocolate Chip Day!

Have you ever wondered if an ingredient would work in a recipe? It is hard to imagine where we would be without the invention of chocolate chips.

In 1937, Ruth Graves Wakefield of Whitman Massachusetts must have been curious what a little bit of chocolate would add to her cookies.

While working at the Toll House Inn, she added cut-up chunks of semi-sweet Nestle chocolate bar to a cookie recipe.

The cookies were a huge success and in 1939 Wakefield signed an agreement with Nestle to add her recipe to the chocolate bar’s packaging.

In exchange for the recipe, Wakefield received a lifetime supply of chocolate.  The Nestle brand Toll House cookies were named for the Inn.

Nestle initially included a small chopping tool with the chocolate bars. Starting in 1941,  Nestle and other competitors started selling the chocolate in chip or morsel form.

Semi-sweet was the original flavor of chocolate chips.  Today the chocolates come in bittersweet, semi-sweet, mint, white chocolate, dark chocolate, milk chocolate, and white and dark swirled.

The imagination is the only thing limiting what recipes chocolate can be used. Today chocolate chips are used in a variety of baking methods from sweet to savory.

Had Ruth Graves Wakefield never wondered what a few chopped up chunks of chocolate would be like in her baking, we wouldn’t even have chocolate chip cookies.

May 16 of each year honors National Love a Tree Day.

On this day, trees are celebrated and recognized for the wonderful gift that they are to us. National Love a Tree Day is in the middle of Garden for Wildlife Month.

Most species of trees tend to be long-lived. There are actually some trees that live to be several thousand years old.

The tallest known tree is 379 ft. tall.

Trees provide more than just beautiful landscapes and a shady canopy on a sunny day.

They play a significant role in reducing erosion and moderating the climate as well as give us oxygen.

Large quantities of carbon are stored in their tissues as trees remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

What to do:

Trees are a vital part of nature.  This is a good day to plant a new tree or spend some time enjoying the beauty of the trees that are all around you

National Cherry Cobbler Day is dedicated every May 17th to the delicious tart dessert that many enjoy with ice cream.

In the United States, cobbler refers to a variety of dishes that consist of a fruit filling (cherry being a popular choice ) covered with a batter, biscuit or pie crust that is then baked.  Some cobblers have both a top and bottom crust.

Cobblers originated in the early British American colonies.

It was because of the lack of suitable ingredients and proper cooking equipment that the English settlers were unable to make their traditional suet puddings, so to improvise, they covered a stewed filling with a layer of uncooked biscuits or dumplings.

A cherry cobbler differs from a crisp as a cobbler lacks oatmeal. Sometimes the cobbler is topped with a scoop of vanilla ice cream!

May 18 marks a fun holiday, National No Dirty Dishes Day.  This is a day that gives us all a break from the regular daily routine.

There are two options for this day.  You can eat all meals out. If that is possible, would also be a bonus treat.

Or, you can use disposable paper plates, cups and silverware.  To stay earth friendly, choose ones that are biodegradable.

What to do:

Go out to lunch or dinner with friends or have a barbecue and serve everything on paper plates with disposable utensils.

Each year on the third Friday in May, millions of pizza lovers across the nation join in extolling the qualities of pizza on National Pizza Party Day.

Celebrate by inviting friends and family to share a night of fun at your favorite pizzeria.

Another way to celebrate is with a homemade pizza with fresh toppings or by having one delivered.

  • In ancient Greece, Greeks enjoyed bread covered with oils, herbs, and cheese.
  • In Byzantine Greek, the word was spelled “πίτα”, pita, meaning pie. 
  • A sheet of dough topped with cheese and honey, then flavored with bay leaves was developed by the Romans.
  • The modern pizza had its beginning in Italy as the Neapolitan flatbread.
  • The original pizza used only mozzarella cheese, mainly the highest quality buffalo mozzarella variant which was produced in the surroundings of Naples.
  • It was estimated that the annual production of pizza cheese in the United States in 1997 was 2 billion pounds.
  • The first United States pizza establishment opened in 1905 was in New York’s Little Italy.
  • Pizza has become one of America’s favorite meals.

Every May 20 National Pick Strawberries Day is observed.   There is something special about the taste of a sun-warmed strawberry picked straight off of the vine.

Strawberry picking time is usually between late April and throughout the summer, depending on what part of the United States you live. When harvesting strawberries, you want to look for the bright red, firm and plump ones.

  • Strawberries are members of the rose family
  • Strawberries are the only fruit with their seeds on the outside
  • Strawberries are an excellent source of vitamin C
  • Strawberries are low-fat, low in calories and a good source of fiber, folic acid and potassium
  • Strawberries help can help fight bad cholesterol and may reduce inflammation
  • The first strawberries were grown in France in the late 18th century.  Prior to the 18th century, wild strawberries were collected and commonly used as a fruit source.

What to do:

Enjoy some freshly picked strawberries and other treats with the kids.

Kids, you work hard every day.  It’s time to show your parents just how hard you work.  After all, your primary job is to play, and the third Sunday in May is National Take Your Parents to the Playground Day!

Outdoor play offers the obvious benefit of physical activity helping to build strong muscles and bones.  It also engages the child’s imagination which contributes to developing creativity as well as self-confidence.

But, a child’s work doesn’t stop there.  Playing with others includes games, focus, and attention.  As a result, playing teaches leadership and negotiation skills.  The more children play, the healthier, smarter and happier they are.

Include all these benefits with National Take Your Parents to the Playground Day, and the value of play is increased exponentially because the whole family is involved.

What to do:

Find the closest playground and take your parents to work.

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HISTORY

PDPlay first founded Take Your Parents to the Playground Day on April 4, 2009, to motivate children to get outdoors and take their parents to their workplace.

Take Your Parents to the Playground Day follows Children & Nature Awareness Month, an event established by the Children & Nature Network (C&NN) to call attention to the importance of providing opportunities for all children to experience frequent, regular play in natural outdoor settings.

National Take Your Parents to the Playground Day provides an excellent opportunity to continue the initiative’s message with families throughout the year.

May 22nd is the day we recognize National Vanilla Pudding Day.  Enjoy it with a delicious dish of cold, creamy vanilla pudding.

The puddings we enjoy as desserts today are not what was commonly known as pudding at ancient dinner tables.

Most medieval puddings were meat based and seasoned with herbs and spices. Even sweetened, they were usually served hot.

Toward the end of the 18th century, puddings were more likely made from a grains or day old bread with nuts, fruit or meats. These puddings were used to stretch meals for a large family.

The creamy pudding we are more familiar with today is related to the custard, minus the eggs.

Necessity may be the mother of invention, but spouses who are chemists are the inventor.

When you are Alfred Bird and your wife is allergic to eggs, that is very true. In 1837, Bird invented an egg-free custard powder using flavored cornstarch.

The earliest packaged pudding in the United States was marketed by My-T-Fine in 1918.  This and other puddings like them still required cooking on the stove.

The instant version came along in the mid-1940s.  On its own or as an ingredient in a larger recipe, pudding can be enjoyed in a variety of flavors.

What to do:

Give the following creamy vanilla pudding recipes a try:

Homemade Vanilla Pudding
Moms Chocolate Chip Cookies
Strawberry Delight Cake
Dessert Pizza

National Lucky Penny Day is observed each year on May 23rd.

 

See a penny, pick it up… All day long you’ll have good luck.

When you are out and about, look on the ground for pennies.  It just might be your lucky day!

Years ago a penny was able to buy something.

(Check out National Taffy Day – to see what we used to get for a penny.)

Today, due to inflation, the penny does not buy much of anything. The metal value and cost of minting pennies exceed their face value.

Many nations have stopped minting equivalent value coins and efforts are being made to end the routine use of pennies in several countries including the United States.

1793 – The first pennies in the United States were made of copper.

What to do:

See how many pennies you can find! Make it a game with the kids to find as many as they can.

Marked annually on May 24, National Scavenger Hunt Day is set aside as a day to enjoy the good ol’ fashioned fun of a scavenger hunt.

American gossip columnist, author, songwriter and professional hostess Elsa Maxwell (May 24, 1883 – November 1, 1963) is credited with the introduction of the scavenger hunt for use as a party game in the modern era.

A scavenger hunt is a game where teams are challenged to “scavenge” for a list of odd items. Participants are not allowed to buy the objects and depending on where the hunt takes place may have to beg, barter or work for them.

Some scavenger hunts add riddles to each item increasing the difficulty of the game.  The team with the most items, or the first to complete the list, wins.

What to do:

Scavenger hunts have become popular at weekend get-togethers, parties, family gatherings and holidays.

However, this would be a great day to have a scavenger hunt at the office or put one together for the neighborhood kids and let the fun begin

National Brown-Bag-It-Day is observed each year on May 25.

Taking your lunch to work or school is an effective way to save money and to ensure you and your family are eating healthy.

If a refrigerator is available, there are more options.  Yogurt, salads, cottage cheese and leftovers can all be stored until lunch time.

Insulated lunchboxes with an ice-pack are also an option when a refrigerator is not available.

When neither is an option, there are still many health choices such as peanut butter, fresh fruits and vegetables, and protein bars.

A thermos is also a good source for taking warm food with you for your lunch.

Each year on the Friday before Memorial Day, it is National Don’t Fry Day.

The goal of National Don’t Fry Day is to raise awareness of all the risks of overexposure to the sun.  It is important for everyone to remember to use sun protection and sun safety practices.

Unfortunately, skin cancer is increasing in the United States, and the American Cancer Society estimates that one American dies every hour from skin cancer.

The risk for ultraviolet (UV) damage to the skin increases as we spend more time enjoying the outdoors now that warmer weather is upon us.

We need to take precautions when we are outside in the sun.

Using a good sunscreen of SPF 30 or higher, wearing sunglasses and a wide-brimmed hat are a few ways to get started with sun safety.

Skin cancer is curable if it is found early.  Be aware of changes on your skin with growths and in moles.  See your doctor if you have any concerns.  Be safe!

For more information see: http://skincancerprevention.org/programs/dont-fry-day

What to do:

Make sure to use sunscreen and teach your children how important it is to protect their skin.

HISTORY

National Don’t Fry Day was created by the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention.

May 27 calls for warm weather and sunshine so we can recognize National Grape Popsicle Day.

In San Francisco, California, in 1905, 11-yr-old Frank Epperson was outside on his porch, mixing water with a white powdered flavoring to make soda.

Upon going inside, he left it there on the porch with the stirring stick still in it.  That night the temperature reached a record low and the following morning, Frank discovered the drink had frozen to the stick.

Years later, in 1922, Epperson introduced his treat at a fireman’s ball where it was a huge success.

Then in 1923, he made and sold his frozen treat-on-a-stick at an amusement park in Alameda, California.  Epperson applied for a patent in 1924 for his frozen confectionery, which he called “Epsicle” ice pop.  He then renamed it “Popsicle“.

Popsicles are one of summertime’s favorite treats for kids of all ages. National Grape Popsicle Day honors one of the most popular flavors!

National Hamburger Day is observed each year on May 28.

This day celebrates a summer-time grilling favorite and National Hamburger Day is part of National Hamburger Month.

Hamburger.  Seasoned ground beef, grilled and placed between two slices of bread or a bun. Top with sauteed onions, peppers, pickles, sliced onions, or cheese.

Add condiments such as ketchup, mustard or mayo. Any one of these combinations would create a modern American version a hamburger.

It is most likely that the hamburger sandwich first appeared in the 19th or early 20th centuries, but there is much controversy over its origin. Over the years, the hamburger has become a culinary icon in the United States.

The world’s largest hamburger was prepared on September 2, 2012, in Carlton, Minnesota by Black Bear Casino Resort and weighed in at 2,014 pounds.

National Paperclip Day is observed each year on May 29.

Yes, even the paperclip has its own day of honor. It is about that well-known piece of curved wire that keeps our papers together and helps keep us organized.

While there are much earlier claims to the invention of the paperclip, according to the Early Office Museum, the first patent for a “bent wire paper clip” was presented to Samuel B. Fay in the United States in 1867.

The original intention of Fay’s clip was to attach tickets to fabric. However, U.S. patent 64,088 recognized that it could also be used to attach papers together.

There were as many as 50 others that received patents for similar designs prior to 1899. One other notable name receiving a patent for his paperclip design in the United States was Erlman J. Wright in 1877.

At that time, his clip was advertised for use in fastening newspapers.

The Gem paperclip, which was most likely in production in Britain in the early 1870s by The Gem Manufacturing Company, was never patented.

It is the most common type of wire paper clip and is still in use today.  It was introduced to the United States around 1892 and in 1904, Cushman & Denison registered a trademark for the “Gem” name in connection with paper clips.  Paperclips are still sometimes called “Gem clips.”

Today, paperclips come in various sizes, shapes and colors and can make your paperwork look more fun and lively.

Paperclips are not just for holding papers together. There are many other things that you can do with them!

  • Replace a zipper tab
  • Unclog a spray bottle
  • Unclog a single serve coffee maker
  • Hem holder
  • Emergency hooks for broken necklaces

Recognized each year on May 30 is National Water a Flower Day.

This time of year, our flower gardens should be in full bloom.

Be sure to keep them hydrated. Not just one, but all of them.

On National Water a Flower Day, it is also an opportunity to care for the gardens of those who may be home-bound or in the hospital. The time to visit a friend who may need some cheering up by bringing them some freshly watered flowers.

National Speak in Complete Sentences Day is observed annually on May 31st.

This day is dedicated to using proper sentence structure while speaking.

In fact, you could celebrate the day while texting as well.

So no LOL or ASAP on May 31.

So if you must Laugh Out Loud As Soon As Possible, you will need to say or type it out completely.

 

 

I love this list for May days so much. It is my favorite of this series so far. So much great stuff to do with the family.

I hope you have found a few activities that you can do, and enjoy, with your family.

If you have enjoyed this post please leave a comment or share on your social media.

I hope you have a healthy and happy May!!

Hello, my name is Kristen Osborne I am a happy mother of one beautiful little girl. Very into the internet and trying out new things.

Team Umizoomi Review: Should your child watch

Team Umizoomi Children’s Show Review:

 

Team Umizoomi is a children’s show on Nick Jr. where this super alien team helps children, around Umi City, solve everyday problems with their tiny superpowers.

Let me just say first before I get into this review that Allie loves Team Umizoomi so very much. At first, I didn’t like this show at all. It was so far-fetched and silly with these mini-aliens and their friend robot. who also drove around in a car that could talk to them. But, now I find myself walking around the house singing their silly theme songs.

 

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Let’s just get right into this….

Team Umizoomi first aired on Nick Jr. back in 2010 on January 25. They are Mini mighty math superheroes coming to save the day. They use preschool concepts of counting, measurement, shapes, patterns and comparisons to teach the viewer math skills.

 

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Each episode consists of a few or all of the following:

  • A task or quest to complete, in order to assist a child in need. Doing this requires smaller tasks along the way. There are sometimes unforeseen difficulties that must be dealt with to proceed. They generally involve math reasoning with patterns, sequences, counting, geometric shapes, and other age appropriate math skills.
  • They almost always “break the fourth wall” where the characters on screen communicate directly to the child viewing the show and encourage them to participate to help solve the problem.
  • A mixture of live action and animation. The team and the surroundings are animated, but the person being helped is often a real child, or even an adult. In the city or other crowd scenes, other real people are shown in the background. In comparison, the team is less than a foot tall.
  • Once the main problem has been completed, the team sings a song and performs a dance called the crazy shake which involves shaking and wiggling back and forth quickly.

In some episodes, a simple explanation is given of an everyday process. Such as, how milk gets from farm to market, or how packages are sorted at the post office.

 

Core Cast consists of:

Milli: A 6-year-old super alien who can use pattern power to solve problems

Milli

Geo: Milli’s 8 year old brother, who can use shapes to build things they might need to solve the problem

Geo

and…

Bot:His abilities are more functional than math-related. His arms and legs can be extended to reach things, by saying “Arms Extendo” or “Legs Extendo” Sometimes “Jaw EXTENDO!”. He has a small receiver (like a satellite dish) on his head to receive calls (called the Umi Alarm). He also has a screen on the front (called a “Belly Belly Belly Screen”) that they can view videos/pictures on as well as have a video call with someone who needs their help. He also has a storage compartment on the back of his body, called a Bot-o-mat, which frequently is carrying whatever the team happens to need.

Bot

The Trouble makers: Their only goals in life are to cause havoc, chaos, and trouble in Umi City, as well as defeat Team Umizoomi. They have a secret weapon called the Trouble Ray, which fulfills their malicious trouble making ways

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Door mouse: he always seems to be around to hinder things even further when there is a locked door or something in the way

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Umicar: the talking car that drives team Umizoomi around Umi City

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This show is very educational and teaches helpful skills for children. Not just the math skills, but sharing, caring and safety as well.

 

I actually enjoy this show. It is only annoying because kids shows these days don’t seem to update very often. I’ve watched the same episodes of a few different shows for about 2 weeks now. But, Allie doesn’t seem to mind. She loves watching the shows no matter what episode it is at the time.

 

In conclusion, I think this show is very good for children around 2 to 4 who are just picking up on some skills. Allie is 2 and she has learned so much from just the short time she has been watching Team Umizoomi.

Now here are some coloring pages for you to print out and give to your Umizoomi loving child 🙂

 

http://www.coloring-book.info/coloring/coloring_page.php?id=292

 

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If your little one loves Team Umizoomi as much as Allie does I have a great deal for you.

I am planning on buying this for Allie this Christmas and I highly recommend it.

 

 

 

Hope you have a wonderful day!

 

Kristen

 

Allie’s Mommy 😛

Hello, my name is Kristen Osborne I am a happy mother of one beautiful little girl. Very into the internet and trying out new things.

Super Pups: Nick Jr. Paw Patrol Characters Review

Super Pups: Paw Patrol T.V. Show Review-

 

Super Pups Paw Patrol:

Allie loves the Paw Patrol characters. She can name each pup and the people as well. She gets so excited whenever she see’s anything that pertains to the show. She has also accumulated some Paw Patrol merchandise.

 

She has a large Skye, Rubble, Skye lunchbox, Chase nightlight, and Paw Patrol blanket.

So, I think it is safe to say at this point that Allie really likes these silly little pups.

Now, on to the review…

The show, in general, is very good. It teaches patience, helpfulness, preparedness, and many other great life lessons that can be instilled in a child at a young age.

I was not aware until I looked up some background information, that Paw Patrol is a Canadian show. It is, in my opinion, a very well made show. I sometimes find myself getting lost in the story. They get into some pretty silly jams and always figure it out together.

Paw Patrol Characters

These are the core Paw Patrol characters who appear in every episode.

Zuma- Is a water loving chocolate lab who loves to surf and drive his super hovercraft to rescues.
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Rocky- is a mix breed who unlike Zuma, is not fond of the water. but loves to recycle and use his super tools to rescue others.
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Rubble- is a playful English Bulldog who loves skateboards, dirt, bubble baths and his digger.
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Skye- is a fearless Cockapoo who flies her helicopter to rescues and does back flips for a super job well done.
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Marshall- a clumsy Dalmatian fire pup who trips over his own paws but always seems to say “I’m okay”.
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Chase- Police German Shepherd always ready to help. Chase is on the case! Allergic to cats and feathers.
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Everest- Husky pup who loves sliding down the ice and snow on her super belly.
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Ryder- The fearless leader, rescuer, teacher of the super Paw Patrol Pups.
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They just added a new pup…

Tracker- a jeep-driving pup with super hearing who lives in the jungle and enjoys playing with the various forms of wildlife there, often utilizes his great hearing abilities to save someone in danger when necessary

tracker

Paw Patrol theme

These pups have a really great brother/sisterhood. They help each other with genuine concern. That teaches more than just compassion. They are always very positive and caring. I am very glad to say that this is Allie’s favorite show.

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If your child also loves the Paw Patrol as much as my little one does then I have a great deal for you. Don’t hesitate to snatch up this deal from Amazon!!(Amazon Link)

What show does your child absolutely love? Let me know in the comments and share this post if you liked it  🙂

Have a wonderful day!

Kristen

Allie’s Mommy 😛

Hello, my name is Kristen Osborne I am a happy mother of one beautiful little girl. Very into the internet and trying out new things.

Vacation: What in the world should you pack?

Vacation: What in the world should you pack… and many more tips and ideas!

If you are planning a summer vacation, whether you have small children or not, you need to have a plan. You will go out of your mind if you don’t set a schedule for packing and finalizing all the details. I have compiled a list of tips and tricks that I believe could help. From a small family to a family of 5 or even more.

These tips are just guidelines, you can tweak them to fit your needs. Vacationing should be as stress free as possible. But, who are we kidding with families everything has some stress involved.

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9 Tips and Tricks for packing:

  1. Start rested- As difficult as it may be, try to finish all your packing and arrangements the day before your departure. This lets all of you take a deep breath before the trip begins. From our experience, much of what we’re tempted to chalk up to jet lag or an uncooperative airline agent stems from the stress of having been up half the night tending to last-minute details.
  2. Get excited- Talk about the trip and the destination with your child, and involve him/her in the planning. When she confronts the real thing, the familiarity will be reassuring to them. And you’ll be surprised at what they remember.
  3. Do it together- When packing, let your child help choose her outfits, but make sure you can mix, match, and layer her options. And accept that your space in the luggage will be what little is left over once your child’s every need has been met.
  4. Lighten your load- If you are a chronic overpacker, read Judith Gilford’s The Packing Book (Ten Speed Press, 1998). Then practice what you’ve learned by not packing the book.
  5. Stroll on- Strollers are truly handy-as restaurant seats, as nap venues, and especially as baggage carriers.
  6. Pack a portable potty- Unfamiliar bathrooms can seem pretty intimidating to a toddler who’s learning to use the potty, so carry an inflatable or portable potty seat and expect some setbacks.
  7. Make time for teddy- Often what little ones want most when they’re traveling is what they already know. Schedule a visit to a favorite fast-food restaurant or some quiet one-on-one time with a beloved stuffed animal.
  8. BYO diapers- Disposable diapers are available almost everywhere in the world, but they can be expensive. If you’re traveling internationally, pack up to an entire bag’s worth. Coming back, use the space for souvenirs.
  9. Rent right- Instead of transporting all of your baby items or having the grandparents buy their own, look for a local rental service.

 

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6 great tips If you’re flying with kids:

  1. Don’t stop- Check with a travel agent so you can fly off-peak and avoid congested airports. Generally, off-peak times are Tuesday through Thursday, plus late at night, very early in the morning, and mid-morning.
  2. Sit smart- Travelers with babies and toddlers are often advised to sit in the plane’s bulkhead because it has extra room. We avoid it, though, because there’s no room under the seat for a carry-on bag, and we need easy access to our toys, snacks, drinks, and wipes during takeoff and landing.
  3. Say “I’m sorry.”- Apologize for any disturbances that your children may cause. Generally, it’s not a child’s actions that most irritate other travelers, but the parent’s indifference.
  4. Carry a toothbrush- No matter how short your flight is, be prepared for the unimaginable: Keep enough food, clothing, and diapers with you for a 48-hour delay.
  5. Play with her food- A few days before departing, call your airline to order a kid’s meal. So what if she doesn’t eat it? She’ll be distracted for a few valuable minutes, and you may enjoy it more than your own.
  6. Do it tomorrow- Driving a rental car from the airport into a strange city is a major source of travel stress because most people arrive tired and disoriented. Instead, arrange to pick up the car at a city location or at your hotel after you’ve had a good night’s sleep. (This can also save you money.) Don’t forget to request a carseat if you didn’t bring yours. And if you’re renting in a foreign country, find out in advance if the car has seat belts in the back. Without them, a carseat is useless.

 

Tips for getting to your destination-

  1. Know your way- Use online map services such as www.randmcnally.com to help plan your trip and to avoid questions like “Daddy, do you know where you’re going?”
  2. Pick perfect car toys Leave toys with little pieces at home-unless you want to practice your yoga by bending, turning, and reaching to the backseat floor every 10 minutes.
  3. Be shady- To keep the sun out of your child’s eyes, get some car window shades or hang a towel from the top of a rolled-up window. When you park, use the towel to cover your child’s seat so it won’t get so hot.
  4. Resist reading- If there’s any chance that your older child will get carsick, discourage him from reading. Instead, play games that require looking outside the window. “Count the American flags” is especially rewarding these days. Check www.momsminivan.com for game ideas.
  5. Bring bags- In case your child does get sick, keep plastic bags at the ready. Gallon-size ones are best and can serve a dozen useful purposes. Bring a spare set of clothing for your child. And don’t make the big mistake-as we did once-of not bringing an extra set for yourself.
  6. Pop in a video- Keep the peace on long road trips by renting a portable VCR. A good source: www.drivinsane.com. Or try books on tape.
  7. Don’t “make time”- Trying to shave minutes or hours off the average time it takes to get to a destination isn’t only dangerous-with kids, it’s an exercise in frustration.
  8. Go for the neon- Dress your kids in bright clothing. Pin a card listing their local and home addresses inside their clothes. And if you plan to hike, learn to identify their shoe prints, in case they get lost. This will also prove invaluable at home when you try to figure out who tracked dirt on the living-room rug.
  9. Cruise where the kids are- When choosing a cruise-ship itinerary, remember that most kids want to be with other kids. You’ll find them on shorter, three- or four-day trips, especially in the Caribbean and during school holidays. Lines that excel at these itineraries include Carnival Disney, and Royal Caribbean.
  10. Remember their shots- Well before you leave for a foreign destination, talk to your pediatrician about getting your child any necessary vaccinations, particularly if you’re heading to an area with a high risk of disease. If you run into a medical problem abroad, a valuable resource is the International Association for Medical Assistance to Travelers, which publishes a directory of English-speaking doctors who will treat members. Membership is free (716-754-4883).
  11. Sleep light- It can take several days for children to adapt to a new time zone. So accept that for a day or two you may be reading Green Eggs and Ham at 4 a.m.
  12. Tuck away the memories- Don’t be too quick to rule out experiences that you think your child is too young to remember. What they might be absorbing as you carry her through New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art or pedal her through the back roads of Holland is difficult even for a parent to determine with any certainty. But it is quite possible that she is forming impressions, however buried they may become, that will play a role in making her the unique individual she will always be.
  13. Slow Down- Plan for a slower pace than you might usually attempt if solo or as a couple. Be realistic about what you can see and do with kids in tow. Don’t try to cram too much into your itinerary. The less you feel you have to see, the more enjoyable and stress-free for everyone.

For the most part, the pace of the trip should be set to what your youngest child can handle. Build into your agenda time for stops along the way for bathroom breaks, snack breaks, and nap time. If you can avoid cranky children it will make for a much easier experience.

 

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Road Trips-

Borrow an idea from the airlines- Purchase or borrow a portable TV/DVD player that mounts on the back of the seat in front. Rent a bunch of DVDs or borrow them from your local library for free.

Take Frequent Breaks– Preferably every two hours. Expecting young kids to sit still longer than that is unrealistic. Find interesting picnic spots, historical monuments, public parks or a playground. Let the kids run around and burn off some energy.

Safety– Pack plenty of water, a first-aid kit, and a flashlight in case you break down at night. Call to make sure your road assistance plan is up-to-date and charge your phone beforehand.

Have your vehicle completely checked out by your mechanic- Oil changes, brake checks, light checks are important to the vehicle’s safe operation. Also, double check the installation of all car seats to ensure they are properly set up for maximum protection.

Determine Your Preferences-

Sit down with your whole family and discuss your ideas and interests. Memorable trips are those where each member of the family gets to experience something they love. Talk about budgets, expectations, and how you can work with the dollars available to plan an exciting family trip.

Travel experts have found that the most successful family vacations are those that involve both parents and children in choosing destinations and planning for their trip. Through these conversations, you will learn more about each others needs and find destinations and activities to suit the whole family.

Be Flexible on Vacation-

Avoiding holiday periods and traveling off-season can yield big savings on flights and accommodation. Even if your kids are in school, consider traveling just outside of major school holiday periods.

Give yourself the best chance to capture a cheap flight. Leaving a few days or even weeks before or after your ideal date could mean the difference of hundreds of dollars. Think about using airfare sales to help determine your family’s vacation destination and time of departure rather than the other way around.

Pack Smart-

Pack the bare minimum because you can always buy it there. Roll clothes and stuff socks and underwear inside shoes. Wear your heaviest clothes on the flight. Encourage kids to choose and pack their own clothes to minimize complaints and to teach travel skills.

Select versatile and comfortable clothes and color-coordinated separates so if something gets dirty you only have to change part of the outfit. And pack bags with what is needed first on the top — a change of clothes for dinner, pajamas, or what is needed during the day including a change of clothes in case of accidents.

 

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Hotel Tips-

Pick a Kid Friendly Location – Stay in a safe and central area that’s close to local attractions, food outlets, the beach, the park, and all preferably within walking distance. This will save you time, money, and your kids from getting bored.

One of the great features of the Booking.com website is you search by Family Hotels.

Duration of your trip-

Stay More Than 1 Night – Many hotels provide their best deals when you stay over more than one night.

Stay over Sunday – Many hotels receive Friday and Saturday night bookings from leisure travelers and Monday-Friday bookings from their business travelers, so there can be a void on Sunday nights.

 

Other helpful hotel tips-

Check for Family Deals – Always ask about discounted rates, free meals for children, and an upgrade at check in – they can only say no.

A Pool and games room – Kids love both of these options. Does the pool have any special features (like a slide or waterfalls)?

Make Sure it Has a Lift – Carrying strollers, toys, and luggage up several flights of stairs is NO FUN!

What’s the room configuration? – For a family of four two double beds is required or a portacot. If you have a baby make sure this is available, and for free.

Coupons and Discounts – Check out the brochure shelf in the lobby and any tourist literature in your room for ways to shave a few bucks off the price of your family vacation.

Enroll in a Loyalty Program – Many hotel chains are now offering free loyalty programs with incentives like earning free rooms after multiple stays. If you travel often and stay at the same chain, or one of its participating partners, you may save on future family vacations.

Check the Dining Options – Does the hotel restaurant and room service have a kids’ menu?

TV Channels – Does the hotel offer several family-oriented cable stations, like Disney, Nickelodeon, AMC, Discovery and Lifetime? Is there a movie library with kids’ movies?

Bathtub? – You’ll want to be sure that your room will include a bathtub. It’s very difficult to give a child a bath in a shower stall.

Laundry – For longer vacations, check to see whether the hotel has coin operated machines for hotel guests.

Consider a Cruise or All-Inclusive Resort-

With activities to appeal to every generation, food choices to suit all ages, and itineraries that can be full-on or you just sit around and do nothing, a cruise or a resort can eliminate daily decision making that can cause conflict. Look for Kids Eat Free, Stay Free, and Play Free deals.

Consider Apartment Rental-

Most big-city hotel rooms were not built for families with young kids. They usually have no refrigerator or microwave, floor space is at a premium, and neighbors can hear every tantrum. But with an apartment you get more space, thicker walls, a kitchen, a washing machine, and separate bedrooms.

These extra facilities on a long stay can make your trip so much more enjoyable.

Do a Test Run-

If this is going to be your first serious trip as a family, consider starting with a shorter trip such as a weekend away or even just a day trip to the zoo as a trial run. This will help you figure out packing choices, daily routines, how fast you can move around, and how you all get along and interact together.

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Set a Budget-

Travel with kids does not have to be expensive. Decide on a comfortable budget that works for your family and include items such as souvenirs, entertainment, and a few unexpected activities. Once again involve your kids to make sure they feel comfortable with your travel plans.

Hot Tip: Every now and then blow your daily budget. We go away to experience things and create lifelong memories. Don’t limit yourself to just traveling for the sake of traveling. Go splurge on a famous restaurant, see a big concert, attend a mega sporting event, go on a safari, jump out of a plane, do something incredible.

Build in Some Private Time or “apart” time

No matter who you are, everyone needs a break from each other at some point. While the goal of your trip is to create shared memories, it is also important to remember that children need time to burn off energy and enjoy the company of kids their own age.

Likewise, us parents need quiet periods for rest and some adult company as well. Keep this in mind and be a little flexible on your trip, as children’s moods and interests can change constantly. If you and your children find something you’d rather do, be spontaneous and go with the flow.

Bring a Few Comforts from Home

Allow your children to bring along a few home comforts such as a stuffed toy, reading books, or a portable music player. Activity packs can be a lifesaver on a plane and car rides. Make one with items such as coloring pencils and books, card games, board games, hand held electronic games, puzzles etc.

Capture Your Memories-

Consider giving your child a journal and a cheap digital camera. Pictures can be put into a scrapbook after you return, providing a lasting keepsake of your wonderful experiences together.

Encourage creativity-

If your children are writing a journal, encourage them to draw and list things they see, eat and experience. And how about buying a cheap postcard from each destination and help them to note a memory on the back, or they can create a large collage to place on their bedroom wall once home.

Keep Meal Costs Down- 6 tips

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Food costs can eat up a large portion of the family travel budget.

  1. Go out for Breakfast or Lunch – Try and avoid dinner as restaurants raise prices. OR, have brunch instead of 3 meals a day. Many restaurants offer lunch specials where items on the dinner menu are offered for a fraction of the cost you’d pay for the same meal in the evening. And we find that breakfast and lunch is easier with young kids as they are tired by dinner time.
  2. Eat Away from the Tourist Streets – Just go one street or one block over and it will usually be cheaper and more authentic. Eat where the LOCALS eat. Also, eat at the popular street carts, usually the most authentic and cheapest meal.
  3. Self-Cater Where You Can– On long stays, we make self-contained accommodation with kitchen facilities a priority. Stay in places with a refrigerator so you can store breakfast foods, snacks, and bottled water. Purchasing your own supplies from the grocery store can save you big bucks.
  4. One meal for two kids– Our kids are young enough to share one kid’s meal so on most occasions we only buy one. You can always buy another if they’re still hungry but you can’t send one back!
  5. Free Breakfasts– When booking a hotel look for one with breakfast included. Also, have picnics, barbeque’s, and house parties. This saves precious money.
  6. Take Your Own Food- Always take your own snacks on flights, buses and road trips where practical. Long road trips or flights can leave kids feeling cranky and hungry. Pack plenty of snacks for yourselves and your children. Do not assume that you will be able to stop and buy snacks along the way as airports especially can be expensive and have a limited selection of healthy options.

 

Do the Free Stuff for vacation-

Many things to see and enjoy are absolutely free. See a street fair, concert, or cultural event. Catch a magnificent sunset, take a walk or bike ride, play in the park, swim at the beach or lake, climb a mountain.

  1. Use the Free Days – Attend museums and tourist sites on FREE DAYS or when they are discounted. Most museums have special discount times or free nights. Before you go anywhere, make sure you look on their website or facebook page to find out if they offer free visiting hours or family discounts.

Advanced Planning-

Finding accommodation when you arrive without booking ahead can be challenging with children in tow. It’s definitely worth pre-booking at least your first couple of nights, even if you want to be flexible on your travels: this will allow you to look for other places in a more leisurely way.

After a long flight or car journey, the last thing your family will feel like is hunting around for somewhere to stay and something to eat. Make reservations and map out your first day or two in advance to make the trip smoother.

Sleep Whilst Traveling-

When taking a long flight, train, or bus journey, try and plan it so you are traveling at night. That way, you don’t have to pay for a night’s accommodation.

Learn a New Skill Together-

We believe life is “all about the memories”. By doing something new together, your children will be impressed with your sense of adventure and curiosity. Learn to kayak, snorkel, surf, a cooking class or spot wildlife in nature. Maybe go snow skiing, fishing or roller blading.

Find something that’s new to all of you and share the joy of learning together.

Expect the Unexpected-

Attitude is everything- no matter how much you plan and prepare, things can and will go wrong. Just go with the flow and everything will work out great. Travel is not always easy and traveling with kids can be tough. So just treat your trip like one big adventure and any mishaps simply become small obstacles for you to overcome.

Plan for occurrences such as air travel delays, illness, and homesickness. If unforeseen events happen, stay positive. Your children will learn important life lessons from watching you on this trip.

You Were a Kid Once-

vacation goes to the kids

Try and put yourself in your kid’s shoes. Remember what you were like as a small child, or teenager, and how you liked to travel and be treated and the things you enjoyed doing.

 

Silly tips you already know but a reminder doesn’t hurt-

Shed the excess you won’t need it. Pack light and pack with intention. You’re staying a few days, not a few months.

Book the Rental Car Early It can take a few days of hunting on different sites, but try to book a month out and get a great deal.

Bring $40 in One Dollar Bills- Whether it’s the skycap, the rental car shuttle driver or the bellhop at the hotel, it pays to have a few extra bucks in hand to take care of those that are taking care of you. Be remembered for your generosity, not your nuisance.

Buy Snacks Before The Airport. This can save you a few bucks at the airport while you wait to board the flight.

Be Grateful- Traveling with children isn’t easy. There are fights over beds, electronics and pool toys. There are encounters with waiters, flight attendants and other travelers. Choose to stick out because of your grateful attitude, not your entitled one. Things won’t always go your way, the weather won’t always be perfect and your accommodations won’t always be ideal. But choose gratefulness instead of bitterness. People notice. And, you will all be happier, which matters most anyway.

Put Your Phone Away– Time away needs to be exactly that. Time away. From Facebook, work email, scheduling craziness, Twitter, endless text conversations… the list goes on. This one is hard for me. I try and get the best picture for Instagram, not just the memory. Chances are pretty good that your world won’t fall apart if you leave your phone behind for a few hours at a time.

Dress with the Airport in Mind The dreaded security line with multiple young kids. Wear slip on shoes (with socks, that floor is nasty) and leave the belt in the bag. If you’re leaving cold and headed to warmer weather, wear light layers that you can shed easily when you arrive.

Soak It Up No vacation will perfectly satisfy you, but work to be engaged and present during your short trip. These trips, whether they’re across the world or simply down the road, are opportunities to forge deep meaning into your families. The bills, the work and the chaos will be there for you when you return.

Bring Cards, Books, Even Homework for Flights and Layovers. Especially on the plane. It’s not simply another place to go to watch Netflix or play Crossy Road. Books, playing cards, even homework can do the trick.

Find a Song- play it every single time you’re in the rental car. Windows down, laughing, singing. Music is part-magic, part-mystery. There’s no doubt in my mind that every time your kids hear this particular song, they’ll think of this specific vacation.

10 tips for taking the stress out of family travel-

  1. Involve the kids. Your ideal vacation may not be what your children have in mind. It’s a good idea to get the kids’ input at the very start of the planning process so they will have a stake in making things go right. Above all, make sure everyone is on board with the destination. European opera houses? Wait for your 50th anniversary!
  2. Do your homework. The better your grasp on where you are going and what you want to do there, the more enjoyable the experience will be. You don’t need an itinerary carved in stone, but you really must have an outline. The Web is a great place to get up-to-date information, as are travel guidebooks. If you work with a travel professional, pick his or her brain; a good agent may have a better idea of what you want than you do.
  3. Build in some downtime- Flexibility is the key when traveling with kids. Everyone will have a better time if each has a chance to do his own thing, whether it’s reading a book or hitting the beach. “Alone time” is greatly underrated in family travel planning, as is “grown-up time,” so take advantage of a kids-only movie night to share a special dinner with your special someone.
  4. Watch your budget It’s easy to overspend while on vacation, but by keeping an eye out for incentives, discounts and other special deals, you can have a great time for less. Let your travel professional know of any special events or celebrations you want to include to make your trip more special.
  5. Book smarter.-Traveling in the off-season (or the almost off-season) can help rein in those costs and keep the crowds down. (If you make your escape during school time, remember to get a homework pack for the kids.) Also ask your travel pro to keep an eye out for family-friendly specials, which often are not advertised to the general public. These “agent-only” specials cross my desk many times a week.
  6. Lose the crowd- If you vacation at a busy time, look for ways to avoid the worst of the crowds. Here’s a trick: Go left when you enter a national park, museum or other crowded venue — most people will go right. And go deep — most visitors stop at the first thing they see. This strategy also works very well in the grocery store!
  7. Honor your elders- Older folks like the chance to be kids, too, so why not see if Grandmom or Grandpop wants to tag along, or even foot part of the bill. It is a fantastic opportunity for children to connect with an older generation and learn a little about times gone by. Reality check: This year’s college freshmen do not recall a U.S. president before Bill Clinton.
  8. Reap your reward- If you are traveling with your kids, you might as well seek out reward programs that fit your family’s lifestyle. No sense in accumulating points to buy business class airfare when what you want are free sodas, a souvenir T-shirt and a chance to meet Cinderella. For example, Disney has a flexible rewards credit card, the Disney Rewards Visa Card from Chase, which provides interest-free financing when you book your Disney vacation or cruise with the card, as well as all kinds of benefits to families planning a Disney vacation. You can earn rewards on everyday spending that are good toward theme park tickets, hotel stays, Disney DVDs, merchandise and other special discounts and perks that you can use while on your vacation. If you have kids and a Disney vacation is on the horizon, this is the credit card for you.

Do it immediately-

As soon as you arrive (unless someone in the family is overly cranky or tired), set up your room to make it as close to home as possible. Put the baby in the playpen or hotel crib with a pile of toys and occupy an older kid with a coloring book. Or have your partner take the older sibling out to get the lay of the land while you unpack. Settling in will help you remain organized (and sane) throughout your stay.

Designate a baby-changing station-

Bring a box of wipes, lay out a changing pad and stack a bunch of diapers in one area. That way, you won’t need to chase down the diaper bag when that first big poop occurs.

Create a play space…

Stash toys and books on a low shelf or in a drawer, or keep all the playthings in one corner. Creating a place for your baby to play will make the room feel homey and keep it from looking like a disaster area.

…kitchen

Even if your room doesn’t have a kitchen or bar area, establish a spot where you’ll keep bottles, dishes, baby food, snacks, formula and dish soap. Sometimes the bathroom is best if it has the only sink in the room.

Naps

Your baby needs her naps, but you don’t want to spend your whole vacation watching her snooze. Follow these strategies for squeezing in that daytime sleep:

Walking

Some moms advise bringing the lightest, most compact umbrella stroller on vacation to save room, but I always pack a stroller that reclines completely to make stroller slumber easier.

Wear that baby

If your baby doesn’t sleep well in a stroller, try a front carrier (like the BabyBjorn) or baby backpack. If you’ve never used one at home but think it might be convenient on vacation, try it out a few times before you leave. Not all babies will like it, and it might be too hard on your back.

Drive around

Try taking leisurely drives to check out the area while your baby naps in the car seat. And on some trips, you can coordinate drive time between destinations with sleep time.

Nap-sitting

If your tot isn’t an in-transit sleeper, don’t be afraid to schedule naps back in the room. While it’s a different vacation rhythm than you’re probably used to, an a.m. break and midday siesta can be relaxing for you, too. Just consider your baby’s napping style when booking accommodations; if you’ll need to return to the room often, a hotel near the beach may be a better bet than a spot farther away, even if it’s a bit pricier. If you can, book a room with a balcony or patio so the parent “on duty” can enjoy the outdoors, too.

Smooth Bedtimes

One of the most worrisome things about traveling with a baby is getting your little one to sleep in a new place.

Getting enough Z’s-

  1. Do some trial runs- If you’re bringing a portable travel bed, have your baby sleep in it for a few nights before you leave. That way, it will feel like a familiar, comfy spot to go night-night on vacation.
  2. Give it a few days- While it can be tempting to throw in the blankie and drive home in the middle of a sleepless vacation night with an inconsolable baby, I implore you to power through. Eventually, babies will adjust to their new surroundings and schedule, and sleep. If you can survive a couple of nights, I am (almost) willing to promise happy vacation days ahead.
  3. Book the right room(s)- If bedding down in the same room means no one will get any sleep, consider booking a suite or connecting rooms. A suite may offer the convenience of a kitchen area, but connecting rooms may afford more space at a cheaper price.
  4. Stick to the routine- If your baby’s bedtime ritual at home includes a bath, lullabies and a bottle, do the same on vacation to make up for the change in location.
  5. Get adjusted- Instead of expecting your infant to shift her internal clock and adjust to a new time zone, shift your day: Stay up later or get up earlier than usual by a few hours.

Meals

Sampling local cuisine and splurging on restaurant meals are vacation pleasures I refuse to give up. Dining with babies can be done.

Breakfast in Bed

Because our times to swim, hike, shop or visit an aquarium are limited by morning and afternoon naps, it makes sense for the entire family to eat something quick in the hotel room. So we pack plenty of ready-made breakfast foods like mini-bagels, cereal bars and fruit (bananas, apples).

BYOF

If your baby drinks formula, it helps to pack more than you think you’ll need. To save space, empty powdered formula into zipper-lock plastic bags. Or order heavy staples like diapers and formula—even baby shampoo—from a site such as diapers.com or Babiestravellite.com that will ship to your destination (and since you won’t have to carry the formula, consider splurging on the ready-to-feed type).

Nurse wherever you feel comfortable

You can breastfeed anywhere you are legally allowed to be.

Bend the rules on Vacation

To enjoy dinners out, you may have to encourage what you would normally consider bad behavior. Putting on some Sesame Street for them allows you to actually taste the food we’re shelling out big bucks for.

Eat early

Sure, a romantic dinner would normally be at 8 p.m., but by dining out at 5:30, you’ll likely have an empty restaurant, room to park your stroller, and a short wait for your food. Alternatively, if your newborn loves to sleep in her car seat, make later reservations and then feed her a bottle or nurse her while you wait for your appetizers. Hopefully, she’ll be out for the rest of the meal.

Now, go enjoy! Toss out all your old ideas about what a vacation should be and embrace the new craziness that is traveling with a baby. Laugh at the fact that you’re at the local playground by 6 a.m. and in bed for the night at 8 p.m. Consider all the gear and baby-lugging as great vacation exercise. And then savor going back home to “regular” life that much more.

Review Tips for the whole shebang-

  • Make an Out-The-Door list- Leaving for the airport — as your holiday starts — is one of the most stressful times of any trip. Have a list of things you need to grab as you’re leaving your home. I don’t mean a list of things you need to take (i.e. 2 pairs of pants, 3 t-shirts ). I mean a list of things you’ll need to physically grab. It should be a last minute checklist of all the little (and big) things you’ll need as you are going out the door. There will be the bags of course, the money belt, some water in the fridge for the airport, some snacks on the counter and sweaters for the plane. Plus all the indispensables you’ll want to double-check one last time before heading to the airport: passports, credit cards, cash. There’s a lot to remember — so have a list for it!
  • Put enough in your carry-on bags for the first day or 2 of your trip. This is good advice for anyone but especially when traveling with kids. If your bags are lost you don’t want to be hunting for diapers or a pair of shorts immediately after your arrival in a new city or country.
  • Count your suitcases, backpacks, handbags and keep the number in your head. This is simple and maybe painfully obvious, but it sure helps. You hop in a taxi, “bag count — 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 — yep they’re all here”. Easy. (Bigger families may want to conduct a kid count as well.)
  • Use a small digital camera The fantastic shots you think you’ll get of the Grand Canyon, or Taj Mahal or Great Wall of China will be left and forgotten. The really great photos that you’ll love and savor for years to come will be the up-close and intimate shots of your kids and your family. And the key to getting great family photos is to take a lot of them. A ton of them! And the way you do that is to take a small camera, have it with you all the time and take pictures as quickly and discreetly as possible. You might insist, I’ll do all that, but with a bigger better camera. But you probably won’t.
  • Practicalities of Travel
    • Don’t fear — airport security. Security checkpoints force parents to be lean and efficient with their packing. Take what you need but don’t take what is unnecessary. Security can also be a good reason not to take stuff on the plane that you don’t want your kid to have (i.e. your kid’s new water gun). And insisting that you keep all your little bottles and creams in a Ziploc bag — what a great idea!
    • Don’t line up early for trains and airplanes or anything where you have a reserved seat. If you’re one of those people who like to maximize their time on the airplane, by all means, board early, get that seat warm, burn through all your snacks before anyone else has even boarded. How great! You’ll have enough time on the plane without artificially extending it.
    • One parent in charge. Don’t share the burden of any one duty while traveling. Packing for example. One person packs and knows where everything is. Two people pack and no one really knows where anything is. Same with hotels. One person plans them, arranges them, and books them. Do you have that confirmation email or do I? Na-Uh!
    • Get online storage for photos. Besides losing the kids, my photos are what I’m most concerned with losing. Forget your bag on the train platform and there goes your camera — and your photos. You can get free online storage at Adrive (50GB) or SkyDrive (25GB). (You will need a laptop, of course, to upload your photos.) Upload your pictures every night or two and then when you take your camera out on that fishing trip you’re not worried about dropping your camera and losing the last 2 weeks of photos.
    • Hire a car and driver. If you’re traveling in an inexpensive or developing country consider getting a driver instead of driving yourself. Prices are usually reasonable and they’ll know the ways and customs of the road better than you will. (Tip: have the address of your destination for longer distance trips. When you start your trip the driver will inevitably say, “Oh yes, I know where that is”, which translates to “I’ll ask for directions when we get there”. An address, instead of just a name, will help speed the process.)

Being There

Beat jet lag- stay up late the first night. Get outside and do something active. Long walks are good. Parks and playgrounds are great. Kids are usually so excited by their new environment you can get away with doing a lot that at home might not work. One caveat: most people forget — or don’t realize — that meal times can be way off as well in a new time zone. If your child usually eats a big breakfast and lunch but a small dinner at home. This can translate into no appetite at breakfast or lunch and then ravenous hunger at 7pm and midnight. Have a good array of healthful snacks in your hotel room on the first night.

Have a plan for the day- It doesn’t need to be cast in stone – stay flexible and easy going — but you should walk out the hotel door in the morning with a plan of where you’re going, what subway or bus you’re taking, what attractions do you have planned for the day?

Check the website of the attraction just before your visit- It’s amazing how often museums will have closed for renovations, changed their schedule, or have a visiting show in place of its usual exhibits. Sometimes these changes can be nothing more than a nuisance. Other times they can ruin your plans for the day. Checking the website in the days before your visit eliminates most of this uncertainty.

Ask your hotel concierge for suggestions- Depending on the style of hotel asking at the front desk will often get you the owner or management who might have a monetary interest in directing you towards a certain establishment or tour group. A concierge usually has no connections at all and just give good advice.

Don’t do too much BUT don’t do too little either- I think the biggest mistake parents traveling with kids make is doing too little not too much. Get out there. Enjoy. Experience. Wear the kids out and get them tired.

Things to Pack- Essentials:

  1. A swim shirt. These make applying sun lotion so much easier. The back, shoulders and face burn the easiest and this takes 2 of those 3 out of play. But they’re not useful just on hot sunny days. If you’re swimming slightly out of the summer season — or even at a temperate swimming pool — they help keep some heat in and delay those chattering teeth for a little longer.
  2. A great baby carrier or backpack. These are life savers in airports, train stations, cobblestone streets and hotels without elevators. Strollers are something to consider but if you have a little baby with you, a good carrier is close to a necessity.
  3. A fabric high chair. These wrap around pretty much any type or size of chair and hold the baby in place so they can sit at the table.
  4. A flashlight and a nightlight. Street lighting might not be as consistent as in your hometown and you’ll probably have a few nights returning to your hotel down a quiet road or path. A torch or flashlight can come in very handy. And a nightlight for the bathroom: Hotel rooms are unfamiliar and finding a bathroom in the middle of the night can be tricky. If your child — or even you — have to turn on a light it makes it much more likely they’ll have trouble getting back to sleep. A stumble over an unfamiliar ledge in a dark bathroom could make for a midnight visit to the hospital — or at least a lot of tears. A nightlight (with plug adapter if necessary) can solve these problems.
  5. First Aid Tape— aka surgical tape. This stuff is great. Adhesive tape that is so much easier to apply than a band aid and actually sticks to fingers, toes, and the places kids really get cuts.

 

Staying Safe

Most things you do won’t make any difference.

The top 5 that might:

  1. Know the fire escapes. A good practice at any time but especially in foreign countries where the exits and escape routes might not be as well marked.
  2. Drill your kids on swimming pool safety. When staying in a hotel with a swimming pool remind your young kids that they don’t go in the pool without telling mom or dad. Make it the first thing you do after you put down your bags in the room.
  3. Get the necessary vaccines and get them early. Check with the CDC or NHS and get the relevant vaccines and anti-malarial medicines well before departure — some vaccines can require multiple visits and can take a few months to get the entire series of shots. Many adults haven’t had their booster shots, so get those as well. There’s nothing worse than getting a deep cut in place far from a hospital and then having to worry about whether your Tetanus booster is up to date.
  4. Fly longer distances and avoid the highways. Flying is the safest mode of transport. There can be many reasons to drive instead of fly but don’t ever not fly and choose car or bus for safety reasons alone.
  5. Act out scary scenarios. If you’re concerned about your child being lost in a busy market, then act out the scene and what they should do. If you tell a kid what to do when they’re lost, they’ll probably forget it. If you act out what they should do they’re much more likely to remember it. (There’s a reason employers do fire evacuation drills — they work!)

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Final word for vacation-

No matter how much planning you could possibly do there will always be incidentals. Do not stress about the things that will inevitably happen. These things are out of your control. Just know that there is no way you could possibly plan for every situation. You are only human! Just enjoy your vacation. Because, at the end of the day this is your vacation too. 

Enjoy the vacation you planned so well. Your family will thank you for all of the hard work you put in for them.

I hope this helped out a bit. I know I learned a lot in my research.

Thank you for reading. I hope I didn’t bore you to much. Have a wonderful vacation week. 🙂

Kristen

Allie’s Mommy 😛

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Hello, my name is Kristen Osborne I am a happy mother of one beautiful little girl. Very into the internet and trying out new things.